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Public Lecture Series with James B. McClintock - Monday, September 11

James B. McClintock will use personal experience and storytelling to frame the dramatic impacts of rapid climate change in one of the most sensitive regions of our planet. Rapid glacial recession, massive ice sheet break-outs, and significant loss of annual sea ice are among the physical impacts presented. But perhaps more poignant are the ramifications of rapid climate change and warming on marine wildlife ranging from phytoplankton to krill and to the Adelie penguin, whose populations have plummeted ninety percent near Palmer Station on the central western Antarctic Peninsula. Despite the challenges of climate change the talk concludes on an optimistic note, recounting the discovery of the hold in the ozone over Antarctica and its successful mitigation.

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Public Lecture Series with Erica Cirino - Monday, September 18

Science writer and artist Erica Cirino is traveling the world to learn more about plastic pollution, science and solutions. She has sailed across the most polluted part of the eastern Pacific Ocean, embedded with world-class scientists in Demark and is now preparing to visit some of the most degraded ecosystems in Asia. Her immersive, on-the-ground journalistic style is inspired by the great ocean explorer Jacques Yves Cousteau, who said, “We must go and see for ourselves.”

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Film Screening - Crossing the Empty Quarter - Friday, September 22

Crossing the Abode of Death - Following flag 160 on a 49 day, 1,300 km journey on foot and by camel across the biggest sand desert on earth. The documentary, much of it shot using drone technology, will tell the tale of the recreation of the first ever crossing of the largest sand desert on earth, the Empty Quarter of Arabia. The journey of 1,300 km reached Doha in Qatar on January 27th 2016, after 49 days on foot and by camel through Oman, Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

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Public Lecture Series - With Lawrence in Arabia - Monday, September 25

Our first speaker will be Mitchell Stephens, a professor of journalism in the Carter Institute at New York University. He is author of The Voice of America: Lowell Thomas and The Invention of the 20th-Century Journalism. Mitchell had the privilege of following Lowell Thomas’s trail around the world and into Arabia. Mitchell has written a new foreword to With Lawrence in Arabia. Our second speaker will be Explorers Club member Steve Pigott who has just returned from tracing the footsteps of Lawrence of Arabia for a Ken Burns documentary. Steve will have slides from this flag expedition.

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Presidential Dinner with Marit Larson and Sarah Charlop-Powers - Wednesday, September 27

Research into the historical ecology of the city and analysis of current environmental conditions is critical to guide the protection and restoration of biological diversity and ecological function in the urban environment. Three case studies demonstrate how science informs local conservation action in New York City: the return of the river herring in the Bronx River, the evaluation and re-construction of salt marsh habitat across the city, and the restoration of Eastern oyster populations in the harbor.

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Exploring Legends With Extreme Skier Kristen Ulmer - Thursday, September 28

Kristen Ulmer is a former professional extreme skier and author of, “The Art of Fear: Why Conquering Fear Won’t Work and What to Do Instead.” Born in Henniker, NH, Ulmer moved to Salt Lake City to attend the University of Utah. In 1986, she started competing in mogul skiing and filming extreme ski movies, which led to her two-decade-long career as a professional skier. Interviewer Jim Clash FR’99 will discuss with Ulmer her colorful skiing career, appearances in Warren Miller’s famous ski films, how to deal with fear, women in athletics and what she’s up to now including her workshops and facilitation tool, “Shift, the Game of 10,000 Wisdoms.”

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Public Lecture Series with Chris Turney - Monday, October 2

Earth Scientist Chris Turney will discuss his experiences and the insights gained from the Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 2013-2014, which he led to one of the most remote places in the world: Cape Denison in the East Antarctic. Turney assembled a remarkable group of professional and citizen scientists for the daring journey. Their aim: to discover what changes are taking place in this globally important region, due to the arrival of a giant iceberg the size of Rhode Island, known as B09B.

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Space Stories 2017

Space Stories is a day devoted to the exploration of space, both on the commercial and private sides. A full list of speakers and their topics will be posted soon, but confirmed so far are former NASA Shuttle astronaut Sandy Magnus FN'10, acclaimed Pluto planetary scientist and Commercial Spaceflight Federation Chairman Alan Stern, private space citizen Greg Olsen MN'07, and Asteroid Day co-founder, filmmaker Grigorij Richters. We will end the day with a live recording of StarTalk All-Stars, featuring the day's speakers as panelists.

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Club Closed - Columbus Day - October 9, 2017

The Explorers Club is closed today - Monday, October 9th - in honor of Columbus Day. We will resume regular operating hours at 9:00 am Tuesday morning. There is no public lecture this week.

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Public Lecture Series with Ryan Pyle - Monday, October 16

Sparsely populated and spanning more than 1.6 million square kilometers of desert, river basins, mountains, and grasslands, the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has had a turbulent history. Many of the events that have occurred there during the last 2500 years have been inextricably associated with its geographical position in northwest China, at a crossroads linking Europe and Asia. Traversed by branches of the series of trade routes that formed the ancient Silk Road, the region has been fought over and controlled by a succession of warlords and empires. Join Ryan as he spends nearly a decade exploring AND documenting the ancient footsteps in shifting sands in China’s remote northwest.

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Public Lecture Series with members of the LIGO team - Monday, October 23

Les Guthman will show the first preview of his new documentary, "LIGO," his exclusive inside story of the historic detection of gravitational waves, a discovery that is a top contender to win the Nobel Prize in Physics this year. He will be joined by Rai Weiss, one of the two creators of the LIGO program and winner of the 2016 Kavli Prize in Astrophysics; and Nergis Mavalvala, MIT astrophysicist and MacArthur Fellow for her seminal work on the quantum puzzles and barriers LIGO encounters as it perfects its huge detector-observatories.

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Public Lecture Series with Dario Schwoerer - Monday, October 30

Dario Schwoerer, a Swiss climatologist and international ski-and mountain guide (UIAGM), experienced the fragile environment he refers to as “his office” degrading rapidly and decided to dedicate his life to educating the public on how to respect nature and protect it for future generations. Joined by his wife Sabine, they founded TOPtoTOP with the goal of being the first expedition traversing the seven seas and reaching the highest peaks on each of the seven continents, relying only on the power of nature and the human spirit.

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Public Lecture Series with Dr. Geoff Tabin - Monday, November 6

Dr. Geoff Tabin is a Professor of Surgery and Ophthalmology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Co-Director of the Himalayan Cataract Project, recently featured on 60 Minutes. Geoff was a former Associate Professor of Surgery and Ophthalmology at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He was the fourth person to climb the “7 Summits,” the highest point of all seven continents; and has pioneered difficult technical rock, ice, and mountaineering routes on all seven continents including the East Face of Mt. Everest.

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Public Lecture Series with John Perkins - Monday, November 13

Who really got to the Pole first? When the news broke a century ago, a fierce controversy engulfed Peary and Cook's conflicting claims, and shrouded the glory of the achievement. This lecture will examine the evidence supporting each explorer, followed by a look at their overall accomplishments, their contributions to geographical knowledge, their personalities, and their reputations, both public and private. The case for both parties will be weighed, demystifying the narrative around the rightful claimant to terrestrial geography's greatest prize.

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Public Lecture Series with Greg Warden - Monday, November 20

New Light on the Ancient Etruscans: Discoveries at the Sanctuary of Poggio Colla in Tuscany - The lecture concerns archaeological exploration on the Etruscans and the archaeological project at a site in northern Tuscany (8th-2"d centuries BCE) that has produced dramatic evidence of Etruscan ritual practice and religious belief as well as an extensive settlement that sheds new light on the life of non-elite Etruscans.

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Public Lecture Series with Sam Mehta - Monday, December 4

Sam Mehta’s presentation will take a deeper view of Japan -- its influence from the Mainland China shaped foundations of the Japanese culture. However, because of Japan’s relative isolation of the archipelago gave rise a very distinct character found nowhere else in the region. Sam aims to show through his lens and narration, the character of this cultural Galapagos full of contracts between modern and traditional. He hopes to present diversity of Japanese landscapes, sites, architecture, arts and crafts, costumes, tea ceremony, exotic foods, pop culture, festivals and lingering legacy of Shintoism, Buddhism and Confucianism that continue to shape the Japanese way of life.

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Public Lecture Series with Dr. Patricia Sutherland - Monday, December 11

A Meeting of Northern Worlds: Indigenous Peoples and the Norse in Arctic Canada - Recently identified archaeological finds from Canada’s eastern Arctic provide new evidence of a little known chapter in North American history. Artifacts resembling those used by Europeans of the Viking and Medieval periods have been recognized in several archaeological collections from Baffin Island and the adjacent regions of northern Labrador.

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Public Lecture Series with Priya Natarajan - Monday, January 22nd

Mapping the heavens: how radical ideas have transformed our cosmic view - This lecture focuses on two radical ideas in cosmology that involve invisible entities - dark matter and black holes. The history of the discovery of dark matter and black holes as well as their current status including recent leaps in understanding from mapping dark matter and the discovery of gravitational waves from colliding black holes will be presented.

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News

Announcing the 2017 Lowell Thomas Award Winners

HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco, FI ‘14
Prince Albert II of Monaco has long been dedicated to the protection of the environment and focuses on fighting climate change, promoting renewable energy, combating the loss of biodiversity, and preserving water resources through his Prince Albert II Foundation. He has also participated in research expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, thus becoming the first head of state to reach both poles. He is a member of the Ocean Elders group and serves on the Advisory Committee for Students on Ice.

Donn Haglund, Ph.D., FE ‘72
Dr. Haglund is a Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of Wisconsin, where he created and taught a pioneering Arctic wilderness field course for more than 40 years. He earned his Ph.D. in economic geography from the University of Pennsylvania, based on work done in Greenland. He is recognized internationally for his expertise in maritime transport in support of Arctic economic development, and for his dedication to scientific research in these areas.

Martin T. Nweeia D.M.D., D.D.S, FN ‘99
Dr. Martin Nweeia is a research scientist, explorer, professor and scholar on the functional significance of the narwhal tusk and Inuit knowledge. His landmark studies on narwhal tusk sensory function have earned him nine grants from the National Science Foundation, as well as awards from The National Geographic Society, Harvard University, and the Smithsonian Institution. He is currently lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, a clinical assistant professor at Case School of Dental Medicine, and a research associate in vertebrate zoology at the Smithsonian Institution.

Konrad Steffen
Dr. Konrad Steffen is Director, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research and Professor, Institute of Atmosphere & Climate, ETH-Zurich. Previously he was Director CIRES, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, and Professor Emeritus of Geography, both positions at University of Colorado Boulder. His interests include climate and cryosphere interaction in polar and alpine regions. In particular he researches sea level changes sensitivity studies of large ice sheets using in situ and modeling results.






President’s Video Report - World Oceans Week

The summer season of exploration got off to an exciting start in June as The Explorers Club hosted its first ever World Oceans Week alongside and in cooperation with the United Nations Ocean Conference.

As the U.N. hosted thousands of scientists, researchers, artists. and explorers from around the world for days of intensive dialogue on the importance of preserving our oceans ecosystems and resources, The Explorers Club and its extraordinary members hosted scores of Oceans Week attendees from early morning to late at night with a series of prominent lectures, film screenings and social programs designed to enhance the total Oceans Week experience.

We invite you now to join Explorers Club President Ted Janulis for an exciting “up close and personal” look at the important role your Explorers Club played in Oceans Week.






“What Would the Ocean Say?”

World Oceans Week has been an incredible success so far. As part of the phenomenal programming that has already been released, we are proud to present the short film, “What Would the Ocean Say?” created for the United Nations in celebration of World Ocean Day, on behalf of James Cameron MED ’03 and the Avatar Alliance Foundation. The project features the work of Mark Dalio FR’16, David Gruber FR’14, Sophie Hollingsworth SM’14, and Gaelin Rosenwaks FR’06.

We’d like to extend a special thanks to the Avatar Alliance Foundation itself. Without the foundational contributions of Maria Wilhelm MN’08, Vanessa Fajans-Turner MN’16, and Kim Butts AN’16, it’s safe to say this incredible week would not have been possible.






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Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste