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World 50x Summit_All Day_All Rooms

World 50x Summit_All Day_All Rooms

Young Explorers Program

Young Explorers Program

Summit 50x_All Rooms_All Day

Summit 50x_All Rooms_All Day

Young Explorers Program

Summit 50x - NY Catering

Summit 50x - NY Catering

Steven Schwankert

Rolex - OWUSS Symposium

Annual OWUSS Symposium
2nd floor
Morning /afternoon event
Request by Dustin Longest on 4/4/18

Empowers Africa Event_Member’s Lounge and Second Floor

Sam Mehta - A Trilogy of Nations

Hold - Mowglis Event

Benjamin Ringe - Mowlgis Annual Event

Rebecca Gardner

ECAD Sunday 2019

The 115th Explorers Club Annual Dinner

At the Marriott Marquis in Times Square.

ECAD Friday 2019

ECAD Thursday 2019

ECAD Wednesday 2019 - Edelman Press Event

ECAD Tuesday 2019

Young Explorers Program

Stecher and Horowitz_Second Floor

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

Club Closed - Presidents Day 2019

Jeffrey Grey_See Ann P

Jeffrey Grey_See Ann P

Spence School_Second Floor_Evening

Young Explorers Program

Hold - Adventure Canada Event

Polar Film Festival 2019

Polar Film Festival 2019

Polar Film Festival 2019

Stecher and Horowitz_Second Floor

Club Closed - MLK Day 2018

Hold - Roger Hartl / Ann Passer

Jackie Blais_Club Tour and Cocktail Reception_Gallery

Young Explorers Program

Hold - Jason Rubin Event - Atlantis Expedition

Kevin_Barbara Hill Wedding

John Levinson - 12-5 - Board Room 6-8 people

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Patrick Hunt - "Tracking Hannibal"

Tracking Hannibal: From Carthage through Spain to the Alps, Italy and Beyond

Hannibal Barca's legendary march to launch the Second Punic War serves as the foundation of his historical legacy as Rome's greatest foe, yet the true route trod by his war elephants had never been confirmed. This lecture is not from an “armchair historian” but instead from “feet on the ground,” where Dr. Patrick Hunt led a ten-year National Geographic-sponsored field expedition to identify Hannibal’s actual trail. It is based on many years of additional field research where Dr. Hunt led archaeological teams for decades of mapping possible Hannibal routes from Cartagena to Saguntum, over the Ebro, Pyrenees, Gaul, Rhone crossing, the Alps, Po River Valley and Ticino and Trebia River battles, over the Apennines, Lake Trasimene battle, Campania, Apulia, Cannae battle, South Italy, Carthage, and the Zama Plain. Even tracing routes on Crete, in Lebanon, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmora, to Hannibal’s last-stand fortress in Bithynia, where he took his own life to avoid Roman capture and humiliation.

Hunt has employed pioneering methodologies and technology to closely examine contexts where Hannibal is most likely to have been. Methods including GIS, photogrammetry, paleoclimatology, geomorphology, palynology, soil chemistry, lichenometry and forensic science have contributed to reconstructing Hannibal’s passage through the ancient terrain on several continents.

Ten years in the writing, Hunt’s well-received biography HANNIBAL was recently published by Simon and Schuster (2017). His teams have hiked over 30 alpine passes - some multiple times - and have also cycled from Avignon to the Alps along the Rhone-Isere-Arc Rivers. Based on Polybius, the best ancient source, Hunt believes it is possible to eliminate most suggested routes for Hannibal’s crossing of the Alps and he favors one most logical pass route.

Patrick Hunt is an award-winning archaeologist who has been teaching at Stanford University since 1993 with a Ph.D. from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, University of London (1991) in Archaeological Science. He is an Elected Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society since 1989 and author of 20 books. Hunt received the Persian Golden Lioness in 2008 in London for his work on Ancient Persia and was also in Iran in 2015 researching and lecturing on millennia of ancient Iranian engineering. He is often featured in documentaries for National Geographic, NOVA, PBS and other media including BBC Radio and other radio interviews.

Date: Monday, December 17

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

t-hold - Sylvia Event

See Will, contact Liz Taylor
2nd floor

Hold - Roger Hartl Meeting - 5-9

via Ann Passer

Saturday Science

Young Explorers Program

Club Holiday Party

Hold - Richard Wiese Private Event - Qatar

Hold - Richard Wiese Private Event - Qatar

Public Lecture Series with Anthony Watts - "Mountains in the Sea"

The oceans make up 76% of Earth’s surface, yet we know little of the nature of the seafloor that lies beneath. This lecture will trace the history of seafloor exploration, from the 19th century, through World War II, to the present-day. Dr. Watts will show that mountains, the majority of which are volcanic in origin, litter the seafloor. He’ll use acoustic imagery to illustrate these mountains and the role they play as a recorder of tectonic plate movement and Earth’s magmatic pulse, then discussing their scientific and societal significance.

One of the mysteries of the sea are the large number of mountains (or “seamounts” as they are more commonly known) that rise up on the seabed and, in a few cases, break surface to form ocean islands. Volcanic in origin, seamounts are widely scattered throughout the world’s ocean basins, especially in the west-central Pacific. Recent estimates suggest there as many as 200,000 seamounts with heights that range from 0.1 to 6.7 km above the surrounding seafloor. Seamounts are generally circular in shape, have pointed, star-shaped, curved, or flat tops, and are often capped by a coral reef. Seamounts are of geological interest because they record the motions of Earth’s tectonic plates and the magmatic ‘pulse’ of its deep interior. They are also significant as ocean ‘stirring rods’, biodiversity ‘hotspots’, and hazards for megathrust earthquakes, submarine landslides, and navigation. Statistical studies suggest that there are as many as 24,000 seamounts higher than 1 km that still remain to be discovered. The charting of these seamounts and the determination of their summit depth, height and age and is one of a number of major challenges facing marine geoscientists in the future.

Tony Watts is Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Oxford in the UK. He received his BSc. in Geology and Physics from University College, London and his Ph.D in Marine Geophysics from the University of Durham. After graduating, he joined the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Canada and then the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University, New York, USA. He has participated in some 20 cruises of scientific research ships to each of the world’s ocean basins and has been involved in all aspects of the acquisition, reduction, and interpretation of marine geological and geophysical data. His current research is focused on the structure and evolution of the Brazilian and Namibian rifted continental margin, the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain, and the Tonga-Kermadec island arc – deep-sea trench system. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the European Geophysical Union and The Royal Society.

Date: Monday, Dec. 3

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Caving Event

Hold - Caving Event

Hold - Caving Event

Hold - Adventure Canada - Inuit Art Event

Robin Brooks_Second Floor_Evening

Film Screening_Second Floor_Murphy and Colin Furth

Public Lecture Series with David Grann - “The White Darkness”

“The White Darkness” is a powerful true story of adventure and obsession in the Antarctic. Henry Worsley was a devoted husband and father and a decorated British special forces officer who believed in honor and sacrifice. He was also a man obsessed with Ernest Shackleton. In 2008, Worsley set out across Antarctica with two other descendants of Shackleton’s crew, battling the freezing, desolate landscape, life-threatening physical exhaustion, and hidden crevasses. Yet when he returned home he felt compelled to go back. On November 2015, at age 55, Worsley bid farewell to his family and embarked on his most perilous quest: to walk across Antarctica alone.

David Grann is a #1 New York Times bestselling author and an award-winning staff writer at The New Yorker magazine.

His first book, “The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon” was also #1 New York Times bestseller and has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, the book was chosen as one of the best books of 2009 by the New York Times, Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, Bloomberg, Publishers Weekly, Christian Science Monitor ,and other publications.

He also authored Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI, as well as The Devil and Sherlock Holmes, which was named by Men’s Journal one of the best true crime books ever written.

Before joining The New Yorker in 2003, Grann was a senior editor at The New Republic, and, from 1995 until 1996, the executive editor of the newspaper The Hill. He holds master’s degrees in international relations from the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy as well as in creative writing from Boston University. After graduating from Connecticut College in 1989, he received a Thomas Watson Fellowship and did research in Mexico, where he began his career in journalism. He currently lives in New York with his wife and two children.

Date: Monday, November 26

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with valid student ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Maya’s Wedding

Maya’s Wedding

Stecher and Horowitz_Second Floor

T-Hold_Ann Passer

Public Lecture Series with Lars Larson, Sweden Chapter Chair - ”Sven Hedin in Central Asia"

Saturday Science

Young Explorers Program

John Bruno Silver Cup Presidential Dinner

Friends Of Alta Fundraiser

T-Hold - Pamela & Martin Neewia Event

Frontline Conservation: Sketching out a Future for Endangered Species

Visiting Explorer Program with Robert Ferguson

News and views from the front line in the battle to stop species extinction, from the deployment of anti-poaching dogs to the role of technology, telling first-hand accounts of those who risk their lives every day fighting poachers.

It is estimated that an elephant is poached for its ivory every 26 minutes. The charity campaign Sketch for Survival asks professional artists, illustrators and celebrities to donate a 26 minute sketch to highlight this shocking statistic, the artworks being auctioned online at the end of the campaign to raise funds for frontline conservation projects.

The Sketch for Survival collection comprises over 450 works from artists in over 30 countries and featuring many endangered species from polar bears to beetles, parrots to pangolins. There will be a capsule collection available to view at The Explorers Club on the night, comprising the sketches of our US artists and selected others. The collection will be on display at the Salmagundi Club on the 15-17th November 1-6pm.

Robert Ferguson is a Trustee of the Explorers against Extinction charity. In this role he has worked on conservation projects with Save the Elephants, Save the Rhino International, Rhino Conservation Botswana, the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and Ol Pejeta Reserve in Kenya. In 2018 he is working with the leading NGO African Parks to provide anti-poaching dogs to Garamba National Park in Democratic Republic of the Congo as well as working with the Govt. of Nepal on a three year project to secure their three tiger reserves. He is an advisor to the non-profit Animals Saving Animals organisation who train and deploy anti-poaching dogs to National Parks and Reserves across Africa and Asia.

His own travels have taken him all over the globe. Highlights include hiking coast to coast across Borneo and explored the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Himalaya mountain ranges, climbing to over 21,000 feet in the process. He has trekked the Simien and Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, climbed Mt. Kenya and travelled the Old Silk Road from Beijing to Karachi across the Taklimakan Desert. He has explored the Tibetan Plateau and the far west of Myanmar by jeep.

In September 2018 he visited Sumatra, Indonesia, to visit Orang-utan and Sumatran elephant projects.

On his travels he's been shot at, charged by a Black Rhino, been rescued from a 150 ft ice crevasse, performed surgery in a remote village in Morocco, given the kiss of life at 16,000 ft and been detained by the Turkish Army. He was also once chased out of a bar in South Africa by a warthog.

Robert is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in London and is a retained travel writer for Footprint Travel Guides in the UK, editing their Nepal Handbook.

Date: Wednesday, November 14

Time: 6:00 pm

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $15

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

John Heminway Meeting_Board Room_Daytime

Jason Rubin Meeting_Second Floor

One Man's Climb - A Journey of Trauma, Tragedy and Triumph on K2

Explorers Club Public Lecture Series with Adrian Hayes

British adventurer, mountaineer, and polar explorer Adrian Hayes tells the deeply moving story of his two attempts on K2 – the savage mountain.

Located in the Karakorum Himalayas on the borders of Pakistan and China, the world’s second tallest mountain has a tortuous history, which has resulted in less than 400 climbers reaching the top in the 64 years since its first ascent – compared to over 5,000 summits of Mt. Everest in the same period. Known as the ‘Mountaineers Mountain,’ K2 is the ultimate prize in mountaineering. Aside from so few people achieving the goal, its fatality rate – a sobering summit to death ratio of 25% - has left scores of climbers paying the ultimate price.

In his compelling presentation, Adrian will tell the story of the mountain and its huge dangers; his two profound attempts on it; and the powerful lessons he learned on the way.

Adrian Hayes is a British record-breaking adventurer, author, keynote speaker, business coach, documentary presenter, and sustainability campaigner. An Arabic and Nepalese-speaking former British Army Gurkha Officer and Special Forces soldier, he has conquered Everest, K2, the North and South Poles, the length of Greenland by kite-ski, and the Arabian Desert by camel amidst a lifetime of adventure, setting two Guinness World Records for polar expeditions in recent years.

Hayes has featured in three documentaries: The Greenland Quest in 2011 for the National Geographic Channel; Footsteps of Thesiger in 2013 and In Inner Mongolia in 2017 for the Discovery Channel and is now an establishing television and documentary presenter. His first book, Footsteps of Thesiger, was published in 2013, and details his 44-day journey across the Arabian Desert. His second book, ‘One Man’s Climb – A Journey of Trauma, Tragedy and Triumph on K2’ was launched in the Middle East in March 2018 and will be published in the rest of the world in November 2018.

Date: Tuesday, November 13th

Time: 6:00 Reception, 7:00 Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Club Closed for Veterans Day

The Explorers Club will be closed on Monday, November 12th in honor of Veterans Day. We will open again on Tuesday, November 13th at 9:00 am. Our public lecture with Adrian Hayes - "One Man's Climb - A Journey of Trauma, Tragedy and Triumph on K2" will begin at 6:00 pm on Tuesday evening, Nov. 13. Click here to purchase tickets online for that event.

Hold - The Clark Art Institute Event - 2nd FL

Hold - Sea Stories

Julie Russ Arizona State Second Floor

Group Tour_50 guests_Lacey_2pm

Christine Dennison Private Event_Second Floor

Hold - Ann Passer - Nicki Africa Visiting Explorer - Upstairs

Visiting Explorer_Mark Wood_Head of English/Irish Chapter

Thisability Not Disability_Lacey Tour_5pm_Elevator Access

Hold - Edelman Event - 2nd Floor

Robert Nicholsberg & Laura Tedesco

Archaeology & Afghanistan
Gallery
See Ann

Public Lecture Series with Virginia E. Miller

Skeletons, Skulls, and Bones in the Art of Chichén Itzá

During the Classic period (300-900 C.E.) at southern Maya sites like Tikal and Yaxchilán, rulers portrayed themselves on stone monuments, elaborately attired and alone, or occasionally with family members or subordinates. Accompanying dated texts tell of their accomplishments. When present, war-related imagery focuses more on the capture and humiliation of enemies than on their sacrificial deaths or their post-mortem remains. In contrast, at northern Maya sites in Yucatán and at Chichén Itzá in particular, the stela format is largely abandoned, portraits of individual kings are no longer in vogue and are replaced by multifigural scenes, and written texts nearly vanish. Battle scenes, heart sacrifice, decapitation, skulls, and bones are frequent themes in reliefs, murals, and other media such as jade and gold.

The impulse to exhibit human body parts and bones as war trophy seems to be nearly universal. Such displays serve to celebrate victories over enemies, as acts of vengeance, and to strike fear in the enemy. Skulls and bones were probably exhibited on temporary structures from very early times throughout Mesoamerica, and death motifs are widespread in Late Classic polychrome ceramics. Nevertheless, Chichén Itzá is unique in the sheer number of skulls and skeletal figures represented on a large scale and in public places. The skull rack or tzompantli, a new architectural form decorated with sculpted impaled skulls, eagles devouring human hearts, and marching warriors bearing severed heads, was prominently placed right next to the massive ballcourt. Even when no human heads were on display, these reliefs may have served as a grim reminder of the potential power of Chichén’s rulers.

Why this upsurge in graphic sacrificial and death imagery between about 800 and 1000 C.E.? Were the Itzá militarily more successful than their predecessors? Why are both victors and defeated presented in groups and anonymously, in contrast to the southern Maya practice of naming individual captors and captives? Did the northern Maya practice human sacrifice on a more massive scale, foreshadowing later Aztec practices?

The new emphasis on vivid sacrificial and death imagery does not necessarily demonstrate an increase in actual human sacrifice, but may instead reflect ideological and political changes that called for highly visible representations of collective Itzá strength rather than the individual statements of personal victories over named enemies that characterize earlier southern Maya art and writing. Just as Itzá warriors became nearly-anonymous members of a large military elite, represented in multifigural reliefs and paintings, their victims, too, became mere symbols. It is their skulls and bones, real or sculpted, rather than their portraits and names, that served as relics of successful battles.

Virginia E. Miller received her B.A. in French from McGill University in Montreal in 1969, then went to the University of Texas at Austin for her M.A. in Latin American Studies and her PhD. in Pre-Columbian art history, which she completed in 1981. In 2015 she retired from the Department of Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she was department chair for several years. She has also taught at Oberlin College and Northwestern University. Virginia is the recipient of two Fulbright fellowships for research and teaching, one in Guatemala and another during which she split her time between Mexico City and Merida, Yucatan. Other fellowships she received include one from the National Endowment for the Humanities and two from Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C.

She is the editor of The Role of Gender in Precolumbian Art and Architecture (1988) and the author of The Frieze of the Palace of the Stuccoes, Acanceh, Yucatan, Mexico (1991), in addition to many articles, mostly related to the ancient Maya art and architecture of Yucatan. Her current research focuses on Chichen Itza and 20th century Maya revival style architecture in Merida, Yucatan. Recent publications include articles on the Castillo at Chichen Itza, on that site’s tzompantli or skullrack, and on the enigmatic figure known as the chacmool.

Date: Monday, November 5

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Program

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Boy Scouts - Exploration Merit Badge event

Ronin Gallery_Herbert_Second Floor

Carl Safina Dinner Second Floor

Hold - Snakes in the House

LEWA Dinner

Public Lecture Series with George Kourounis

Mother Nature’s Bad Moods

20 Years Of Documenting Extreme Forces of Nature and Climate Change

For twenty years, George Kourounis has been documenting extreme forces of nature around the world and sharing his findings via the internet, public talks, assisting scientists, and by hosting numerous television programs. In this lecture, he’ll be sharing some of his most exciting, dramatic, and sometimes hilarious and harrowing experiences that span 65 countries.

Some of the topics he will cover include:

Almost two decades of tornado chasing across the Great Plains of the United States which boasts the highest density of tornado activity in the world. Here, George and team have been witness to some of the most powerful winds on Earth, including the world-record largest tornado. At 2.6 miles wide (4.3km), it was the largest ever documented.

The National Geographic Society funded expedition that George led to look for extremophile bacterial life at the bottom of the Darvaza Crater in the central Asian nation of Turkmenistan. The crater, known locally as the “Doorway To Hell” is a flaming sinkhole of burning methane gas that has been burning for close to 50 years. In the process, George became the first person to ever set foot at the bottom amongst the flames.

Hurricanes, which are another phenomena that George documents. He’ll show what it was like to ride out the most intense part of Hurricane Katrina, where the entire town around him was coming apart, and the winds were too strong to stand up in.

Descending down inside many of the worlds active volcanoes, some of the craters deeper than skyscrapers, to get as close as possible to the violently churning lava below.

The Naica Crystal Cave expedition in Mexico. Probably the most beautiful place on Earth. The cave is filled with the largest crystals on Earth, some 30 feet long, and weighing in at 55 tons. Despite the incredible beauty, the place is deadly, with heat and humidity so high that access to the cave, even when wearing special cooling-suits, is measured in mere minutes at a time.

He hopes to inspire people to appreciate the power and beauty of the natural world, and to get people, especially students interested in conservation and environmental stewardship.

Explorers Club Fellow George Kourounis is also an Explorer-In-Residence for the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. He specializes in documenting extreme forces of nature worldwide, including: volcanoes, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and other extreme weather events as well as the effects of global climate change. He is The Explorers Club Canadian Chapter Chair and is also a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, a member of the Society Of Environmental Journalists, and has given 4 TEDx talks related to exploration and his expeditions. He has addressed the United Nations Environmental Emergencies Forum, and in 2014 he won the Stefansson Medal from The Explorers Club Canada Chapter for his “outstanding contributions to science and to public education.” In 2015, the Explorers Museum presented him a medal "for courageous contribution to scientific research."

Date: Monday, October 29

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Program

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with valid academic ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

The 2018 Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner



Click here to purchase tickets online


Ticketing is now open for the 2018 Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner at the Museum of Science in Boston, MA. We are also offering a special block of discounted early-bird tickets, available to all guests before Saturday, September 1!

The Lowell Thomas Awards were first presented on the occasion of The Explorers Club’s 75th anniversary, October 17, 1980, to a group of outstanding explorers including Carl Sagan, Isaac Asimov, Sylvia Earle, and Lowell Thomas himself. Since that time, the honor has been bestowed upon Buzz Aldrin, Sir Edmund Hillary, Jim Lovell, Mae Jemison, Sir David Attenborough, Chuck Yaeger, and many more.

As a community dedicated to preserving the instinct to explore, we have always valued curiosity, determination, and ingenuity. For our 2018 Lowell Thomas Awards, we celebrate individuals who have demonstrated the skills necessary to engineer groundbreaking expeditions and expeditionary science.

Our 2018 Lowell Thomas Awardees are an incredible group, including organismic & evolutionary biologist Peter Girguis, aerospace biomedical engineer and space suit designer Dava Newman, groundbreaking Egyptologist Sarah Parcak, Principal Investigator of NASA's New Horizons Pluto mission Alan Stern, and Nobel prize-winning physicist Rainer Weiss.​

Held at the venerable Boston Museum of Science and featuring a weekend of events at incredible cultural institutions across the "cradle of liberty," the 2018 Lowell Thomas Awards promises to be an event guests won't soon forget. More information on weekend excursions and auction items coming soon.



Schedule


Friday, October 26
•  Weekend VIP Kickoff Cocktail Party with Awardees and Special Guests co-hosted with the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. For Bunker Hill & Ticonderoga ticket holders, as well as all table buyers.

Saturday, October 27
•  Morning Awardee Symposium open to all guests.
•  VIP Lunch with Awardees and Special Guests, for Ticonderoga ticket and table buyers.
•  Cocktail Reception & Silent Auction at the Museum of Science in Boston.
•  The Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner, black tie gala at the Museum of Science in Boston.

Sunday, October 28
•  VIP Choice of Sunday Excursions, for Bunker Hill & Ticonderoga ticket holders, as well as all table buyers. More details to follow.
•  Sunday Presentations open to all guests.


Hotel

The Royal Sonesta (40 Edwin H Land Blvd, Cambridge) is our preferred hotel for the weekend and is walking distance from the Museum of Science. Our rate starts at $269 per night, please make all reservations through the specific link below. The Club was able to extend the specialty price to include Thursday for those arriving in town early.

Click here to reserve at the Royal Sonesta


Be sure to follow us for more updates!
      

Alan Rabinowitz’s Memorial_Daytime

Eleyna - Clark

Gallery - night event
See Will

Hold - Chris Burkard Photographer Event

Ann Passer Hold - ask her for more info - visiting explorer set-up

Black Rock Meeting_Second Floor_Daytime

College of the Atlantic Reception_Second Floor

Hold - Gallery - Lorie Karnath Book Signing Event

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Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste