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Julie Russ Arizona State Second Floor

50x Summit_All Room All Day

50x Summit_All Room All Day

Hold - Wedding - Alessandra DeBenidetti

50x Summit_All Room All Day

NY Catering_50x Summit_All Rooms All Day

NY Catering_50x Summit_All Rooms All Day

T-Hold - Jeannie & Anders Knudsen Rehearsal Dinner

T-Hold - Dennis Shapiro - Wedding

Tent. Hold -  Columbia / Maud

2nd Floor - See Britt.

Public Lecture Series with David Harrison

Exploring the Plants, Languages and Traditional Knowledge of Vanuatu

Dr. K. David Harrison

Indigenous peoples around the world are stewards of most of the planet’s biodiversity, and also possess the greatest linguistic and cultural diversity. These three domains—Environment, Language, Culture—are critically interconnected. As entire domains of knowledge about the natural world vanish with disappearing languages, humanity’s ability to sustainably manage diverse ecosystems diminishes. Plant and animal species that are well known to local people but not yet known to science enter a twilight of extinction risk.

As a Linguist and Anthropologist, David Harrison spent the last two decades working closely with indigenous communities to help sustain their languages and knowledge. Small cultures are eager to cross the digital divide and acquire current technologies, while still maintaining traditional lifeways and revitalizing their languages. Their knowledge base is only beginning to be respected and acknowledged by scientists and explorers, and may hold the keys for sustainable human living on earth. By collaborating with communities in the creation of digital archives, online Talking Dictionaries, and books, the knowledge base can be maintained and secured for future generations.

In this talk, Dr. Harrison presents a multimedia report of three recent expeditions to southern islands of Vanuatu (Aneityum and Futuna). Materials contributed by those communities demonstrate the rich knowledge base these cultures have about plants, islands, and ocean ecosystems, and show a unique cultural genius for adaptation and creativity.

Dr. K. David Harrison is a linguist and leading specialist in the study of endangered languages. He co-led the Enduring Voices Project at National Geographic Society and is Professor of Linguistics at Swarthmore College. Harrison received his PhD in Linguistics from Yale University in 2000, his MA in Slavic Languages from the Jagiellonian University of Cracow, Poland, and his BA in International Studies from The American University in Washington, DC.

Harrison has done extensive fieldwork in Siberia, Mongolia, India, the Pacific, and Native America. His work includes not only scientific descriptions of languages, but also storybooks, talking dictionaries, and digital archives for the use of native speaker communities. Harrison co-stars in the Emmy nominated documentary film “The Linguists”, and makes frequent media appearances to promote language diversity. His book “The Last Speakers: The Quest to Save the World's Most Endangered Languages” depicts the human factor in language extinction, recounting the personal stories of linguistic survivors from remote corners of the globe.

He is also the author of “When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge” Harrison makes frequent media appearances to promote language diversity, and his research is widely discussed in mainstream media. He has appeared on Good Morning America, The Colbert Report, WHYY Radio, BBC, NPR and in many other outlets. His work has been featured in in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Science, Nature, The Los Angeles Times, and USA Today.

In 2004 Harrison co-founded the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages, a non-profit dedicated to raising awareness, documenting and revitalizing small languages. The institute runs language documentation projects around the globe. In 2006 he coined the term, "language hotspots", which has since become a leading promotional metaphor for understanding the language extinction crisis.

Date: Monday, June 18

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Public Lecture Series with Sean Ahearn

Ocean Week 2018

Ocean Week 2018

Ocean Week 2018

Ocean Week 2018

Ocean Week 2018

Ocean Week 2018

Hold - Board Meeting

Public Lecture Series with Adrian Hayes

Public Lecture Series with Chris Goldfinger

Hold - Shark Stories

Jeff Morgan_Second Floor

Public Lecture Series with John Hale

Delphic Volcano Gas Huffing

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Seminar Series - Kristen Ulmer

Seminar
Would room like the Board Room, may overflow to another room.

Public Lecture Series with Peter Whiteley

Hold - Alan Stern Event

Saturday Science for Students

Hold - Big Cat Night - World Wildlife Day

T-Hold - Bard Music Festival Gala

Public Lecture Series with Tony Watts

Hold - Cave Stories

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Hold - Cave Stories

Saturday Science for Students

T-Hold - Tiffany West Wedding

T-Hold - Martin Kraus Expedition Event - Plaisted 50 year north pole anniversary

Empowers Africa

Public Lecture Series with Hendrik Dey

T Hold - Sailing Stories

Hold - Jutt Wynne Event

Hold - Ann Passer - Wildlife

Hold - Christopher Wojcik Event

KM add

Hold - Mowglis Reception - 6-9pm

Hold - Scottish Night - Tartan, Whisky, etc

Hold - Ann Passer - Wildlife

Public Lecture Series with Mark Siddall

Students On Ice_Gallery and Second Floor

Public Lecture Series with Josh Hammer

T-Hold - Tiffany West Wedding

Faanya - Private Event

Faanya concert - 2nd fl.

T- NGEN w/ Mappy Hour

See Britt

Hold - Visiting Explorer - Susan Mattheson

Public Lecture Series with Jim Turner

The Quest for the Lost Tomb of Chan Bahlum

Investigations at Palenque, Mexico and Robinson Crusoe Island, Chile

The ancient Maya culture of Central America has fascinated scholars and the general public alike for more than 175 years since the pioneering explorations of Catherwood and Stephens in the 1840s. With soaring temple pyramids and exquisite sculpture and hieroglyphic inscriptions, the mysteries of the Maya stimulate the imagination in ways unparalleled by most other pre-Columbian civilizations of the western hemisphere. Since his very first visit to Palenque in southern Mexico in 1995, archeologist Jim Turner has sought to plumb the depths of this enigmatic culture in an attempt to elucidate the sublime sophistication of their constructions and the stunning accuracy of their astronomical knowledge.

During a seemingly unrelated adventure in 1996 on Robinson Crusoe Island off the coast of Chile, Jim stumbled upon a megalithic monument larger than the Egyptian Sphinx which depicted the Mayan Sun God and a crouching jaguar, the two central images depicted in Palenque’s Temple of the Sun. Assuming it to be the work of the ancient Palenque king Chan Bahlum, Jim has spent the last 20 years patiently unravelling the secrets of this monumental masterpiece. As perhaps the most famous of all Maya kings, Pakal the Great was buried upon his death in his famous tomb deep within the Temple of Inscriptions by his son Chan Bahlum who inherited the throne and presided over a Golden Age of art and architecture that has caused Palenque to be considered the crown jewel of Maya cities. But Chan Bahlum’s burial chamber, often referred to as the “Holy Grail of Mayan Archeology”, has never been identified despite decades of excavations within each of his temple pyramids. This lecture will detail the evidence that suggests Chan Bahlum is entombed behind his funerary monument on the quasi-mythical Island of the Jaguar Sun.



With the knowledge of the distant island monument guiding his research, Jim was able to reverse-engineer an interpretation of the Palenque hieroglyphic inscriptions and reveal an unknown dimension of geographical knowledge and scientific accuracy hitherto unrecognized for an ancient civilization. Beyond the technical and navigational abilities required just to travel the 3,000 miles to the treasure island, the Maya demonstrated their mastery of astronomy by positioning the monument at a location that witnessed the final total solar eclipse of 2012 a mere one degree above the ocean horizon at sunset at the end of a 5,000-year calendar cycle. The astounding precision of their prediction of this eclipse is essentially beyond even our most advanced science of the present day. And it is the eclipse geometry incorporated into the island monument as well as in the temple complex of Chan Bahlum in Palenque that elicits the elegant solution to the mystery of the location of his hidden burial chamber. Building on new data from his eighth expedition to the island in December 2016 to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the monument’s discovery, Jim will publicly reveal for the first time the likely location of the entrance to the tomb of Chan Bahlum.

Jim Turner has a Masters degree in Mesoamerican archeoastronomy and is the founder and Principal Investigator of STRATA Cultural Resource Management, an archeological consulting firm based in New York. He has conducted more than 100 archeological investigations across New York State and has identified dozens of sites ranging from 4,000-year-old Archaic ceremonial caches to more recent Revolutionary War-era sites. He flies a Phantom drone and utilizes a Makerbot 3D printer to help image and model the aspects of some of his discoveries. He is also an avid eclipse chaser with visits to 9 different countries to witness these rare astronomical events with his most recent trip in August 2017 to Cerulean, Kentucky where he positioned himself along the centerline at the Point of Greatest Eclipse. He is currently planning his ninth expedition to Robinson Crusoe Island where he hopes to fly a drone-mounted infrared camera and use a remote inspection camera to reveal for the first time in over 1,300 years the interior of the tomb of Chan Bahlum.

Date: Monday, March 19

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you can also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Julie Steamer

Students On Ice_Gallery and Second Floor

Hold - Gallery - Noon-3p - Fritz Selby Event

T-Hold - Ann Passer - Polish Movie

Public Lecture Series with Patricia Wright

ECAD 2018 Sunday

The 114th Explorers Club Annual Dinner


Described by James Cameron as “the Academy Awards of Exploration,” The Explorers Club is proud to once again host the world's largest gathering of explorers, with our 114th Explorers Club Annual Dinner. Honoring the world’s leading explorers and field scientists since 1904, more than 1,200 explorers and guests will converge on Times Square at the Marriott Marquis on March 10th, 2018.

This year, we look at Next Generation Exploration: Frontiers, Technology, Innovators

Upon his recognition at our 109th Annual Dinner, the late John Glenn defined exploration as curiosity in action:

“…and if you think about it, curiosity is far more than just wanting to go and look at some new scenery someplace—it’s an attitude...Our whole history has been one of dragon pushing. Pushing dragons back off the edge and filling in gaps on the maps.”


ECAD 2018 will provide guests with a look at the new frontiers being driven by that insatiable curiosity in action, the technologies being developed which push the boundaries of the human experience, and the indomitable spirit of those who continue to push dragons off the map.



The Explorers Club Medal

Captain James A. Lovell, CO ‘66

In less than two decades, U.S. Navy Captain James Lovell (ret) managed to participate in four groundbreaking space flights. The first, Gemini 7, took place in 1965 and included the first rendezvous of two manned maneuverable spacecraft. A year later, he and Buzz Aldrin completed Gemini 12, a 4-day, 59-revolution flight that brought the Gemini program to a successful close.

In 1968 Lovell was assigned to be the Command Module Pilot of Apollo 8 – man's maiden voyage to the Moon. It was during this flight that Lovell and his fellow crewmen became the first humans to leave the Earth's gravitational influence, and to see the far side of the Moon.

In April 1970, on Apollo 13, Lovell became the first person to journey twice to the Moon. En route, an explosion occurred in the Service Module cryogenic oxygen system. Lovell and crewmen, John L. Swigert and Fred W. Haise, working closely with Houston ground controllers, converted their lunar module "Aquarius" into an effective lifeboat. Their emergency activation and operation of lunar module systems conserved both electrical power and water, enough to assure their survival in space and their safe return to Earth.

Among other awards, Captain Lovell has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, and the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. He has been a member of The Explorers Club since 1966 and carried The Explorers Club Flag on Apollo 8 and Apollo 13.


The Buzz Aldrin Space Exploration Award

Jeff Bezos, MN ‘14

Jeff Bezos is the founder of aerospace company Blue Origin, which is working to lower the cost and increase the safety of spaceflight so that humans can better continue exploring the solar system. Driven by its company motto, Gradatim Ferociter or “step by step, ferociously,” Blue Origin’s incremental development process builds upon each success as it develops groundbreaking spaceflight systems. In 2015, Blue Origin’s reusable rocket, New Shepard, made history with the first ever vertical landing from space. It was the first of four flights for the reusable rocket, with each subsequent flight leading to the first crewed test flights that are planned to take place in early 2018, and the start of commercial service shortly thereafter.

In 2014, Bezos and his team received The Explorers Club Citation of Merit for recovering the F-1 engines of the Saturn V rocket that sent Apollo 11 astronauts to the moon. Aside from his exploration, Bezos founded Amazon.com in 1994 with the mission of being Earth's most customer-centric company, as well as several other companies and philanthropic endeavors.

Bezos graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University in 1986, and was named TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year in 1999.


The Citation of Merit

Edith A. Widder, Ph.D., FN ‘99

Dr. Edith Widder's distinguished career as a deep sea explorer has taken her to some of the most remote and inhospitable places on earth, places 3,000 feet beneath the surface of the ocean where pressures exceed 1,300 pounds per square inch. Her main purpose for braving these dangerous depths is the pursuit of her passion, the study of how the ocean’s inhabitants use bioluminescence to help them survive in the ocean's darkest depths. This passion has led her to develop new ways to explore the deep sea and her innovations have produced many observations of animals and behaviors never seen before, including the first images of a giant squid in the deep sea. These accomplishments have resulted in her being included in the Women Diver’s Hall of Fame and receiving a 2006 MacArthur Genius award.

In 2005 Edie helped found the Ocean Research and Conservation Association (ORCA), a marine conservation not-for-profit, which is focused on using new technologies to find pollution and stop it at its source.


The Sweeney Medal

David A. Dolan, FN ‘03

David Dolan has committed his life to combine his passion for exploration with international humanitarian service. He established health clinics, orphanages, water wells, and housing projects on four continents and climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro and Mt. Kenya to raise funds to fight poverty. In addition to his humanitarian work, he is committed to environmental justice and animal conservation, volunteering for several non-profit organizations including the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

David has served on the Explorers Club’s Board of Directors and was its first Vice President for Development. Currently he is the co-chair of the Development Committee, Founder of The Explorers Club’s Famous Firsts Campaign, and Chair of The Legacy Society Committee. On July 21, 2017, four years after being diagnosed with severe lung disease, David received a double lung transplant at UCSD, and now recovered from this life-saving surgery. With his new found health, David is thrilled to continue his commitment to service.


The New Explorer Award

Gino Caspari, Ph.D., TM ‘15

Dr. Gino Caspari is a Swiss archaeologist and explorer. The Fulbright alumnus and Columbia University graduate focuses on the discovery and analysis of ancient landscapes, graves, and ruins. Years of fieldwork, rigid academic training, and a sense of adventure have led him to work in remote steppes, mountains, and deserts. As a year-long grantee of the Swiss National Science Foundation, he has recently led an expedition into Southern Siberia where he found and documented the oldest royal Scythian tomb together with colleagues of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Hermitage Museum. He produces the documentary Frozen Corpses Golden Treasures in close cooperation with cinematographer Trevor Wallace, making archaeological exploration and discovery accessible to a broader audience and raising awareness of the destruction of cultural heritage caused by looting and illegal art trade. Gino is currently establishing the ArchaeoExploration Foundation with the aim of promoting archaeological field research in understudied and remote areas around the globe.

Trevor Wallace, MN ‘13

Trevor Wallace is an expedition filmmaker focusing on the wild, remote corners of the world and stories of the human spirit. Trevor has done three investigative and field research expeditions with Dr. Gino Caspari, capturing their search for Scythian tombs in the feature documentary Frozen Corpses Golden Treasures. In the summer of 2017, Trevor carried Flag 134 with Dr. Gino Caspari to Siberia where they, along with a team of archaeologists from the Russian Academy of Sciences, were the first to document the tomb of Tunnug-1, the oldest Scythian royal tomb ever found. Trevor’s films have been screened at the American Museum of Natural History, the Polar Film Festival, and the World Water Forum.


Tickets

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If you wish to purchase a ticket online, you may do so via our eventbrite ticketing site. Note that this will cause you to incur a payment gateway processing fee. If you would like to avoid that fee, feel free to purchase tickets by calling us at 212.628.8383, emailing us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or mailing us a check at The Explorers Club, 46 East 70th Street, NY, NY, 10021.


The Marriott Marquis — Times Square, NYC

Click here to reserve rooms at the Club's rate




ECAD 2018 Friday

Hold - Ocean Elders Board Meeting

ECAD 2018 Thursday

ECAD 2018 Edelman Press Event

Super T-Hold - Wolves

The Last Wild Men of Borneo: A True Tale of Death and Treasure

Explorers Club Public Lecture Series with Carl Hoffman

To understand Michael Rockefeller’s disappearance in 1961 for his book Savage Harvest, Carl Hoffman went deeper than he’d ever gone before, making two journeys of several months, each to one of the remotest places on earth – the swamps of southwest New Guinea, home to the Asmat people. The experience culminated in his living with former headhunters in a two room wooden house without electricity or plumbing, in a village without a single store, and only reachable by boat.

For Hoffman, these trips evoked the story of Bruno Manser, a Swiss shepherd who’d traveled to meet the Penan, the indigenous nomads of the great forests of Borneo, in 1984. Bruno crossed a line and became known to even the Penan themselves as Lakei Penan—Penan Man. He spoke their language, hunted with a blowpipe, walked over the jungle thorns barefoot, and eventually led the Penan like a T.E. Lawrence of the rainforest, in a revolt against the powerful Malaysian logging industry.

What fascinated Hoffman about his story wasn’t just what he did, but how the developed world reacted to him, how he was venerated, lionized—how he fulfilled every Western trope about indigenous people. But so, too, had something gone terribly wrong, and he had vanished in the forest in 2000. There were rumors: Murdered? Driven mad? No one could say for sure.

Serendipitously, while pondering Bruno during a visit to Bali, Hoffman met an American named Michael Palmieri. He had lived on the island for more than 40 years and, though a little older than Bruno, was of the same generation. They’d both been called to serve in their national militaries and both had refused. They’d both left their cultures and ended up traveling deep into the rivers and rainforests Borneo. But Michael, seeking the exquisite and powerful carvings of the indigenous tribes, had gone in and come out, in and out, over 150 times since 1974, and the fruits of his labor were displayed in many of the world’s greatest museums—another tangible proof of us coveting their worlds.

Michael and Bruno were completely different kinds of men. Bruno was an idealist, a do-gooder, a refugee from the modern world who despised the cult of Western consumerism and devoted his life to the Penan. Michael was a buccaneer, a man who spent his life buying and selling the Dayak’s art, the physical manifestations of their sacred universe, pieces that fed our hungry souls and rose in price even as the cultures that produced them were dying, and in doing so had carved out a comfortable life for himself.

But hearing Michael’s story, it struck Hoffman that he and Bruno were two pieces of a whole, two men who spent their lives in pursuit of the sacred fire of “exotic” indigenous people. They’d both become obsessed with Borneo’s people, were fascinated with sacred cultures and our romantic notions of their power. The two were hungry to touch a perceived Eden of our past, desperate to hold it in their hands and in their hearts, both trying to fill some piece of their souls with it, from it, in very different ways.

And then Michael told Hoffman that he’d met Bruno – their paths had crossed one day in Borneo in 1999.

He decided then to follow the stories of Michael and Bruno, two narratives that were really one. It was the story of the fate of Borneo: the place itself and an idea that we coveted, the last Eden of our imagination, a wild garden filled with spirits and magic and unconquered people. He would find out what happened to Bruno Manser and how well either of these wild men of Borneo had succeeded in fulfilling their dreams. Dreams of being adventurers in a strange land. Dreams of escaping western culture and wrapping themselves in the powers of Borneo’s indigenous people. And the most difficult dream of all – of saving its inextricably linked wildness and culture.

Carl Hoffman is an Explorers Club Fellow and the author of the New York Times bestselling Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Rockefeller’s Tragic Quest, which was a New York Times editor’s choice and one of the Washington Post’s 50 notable books of 2014. The Lunatic Express: Discovering the World via Its Most Dangerous Buses, Boats, Trains, and Planes, was named one of the ten best books of 2010 by the Wall Street Journal. He is a former contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler and Wired magazines and has reported from some eighty countries, including the high Arctic, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, West Papua, Papua New Guinea, Mongolia, Mali, Egypt and both Russia and the former Soviet Union.

Date: Monday, March 5

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us a 212.628.8384.

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Saturday Science for Students

t- hold - Ann Passer

Big Cats or Sarah Dupont, see Britt

T-Hold - Ann Passer

Big Cats or Sarah Dupont, see Britt

T-Hold - Panthera - Board Room / Gallery

March Hare - Adventure Canada - 3pm to Close

Musk Ox Stew

Hold - Marc BB - Members Lounge & Gallery - Evening

Hold - Horowitz Concert

Public Lecture Series with Jim Herrington

The Climbers

Jim Herrington will be presenting his photography book The Climbers, the culmination of a 20-year project to track down and document the surviving legendary climbers of the early-to-mid 20th Century ‘Golden Age’ of climbing. These are the men and women from around the world who were vertically active between the 1920s and 1970s, who were at the cutting edge of an activity mostly unknown to the general public of the time. The stories of these climbers and their era are inspiring and captivating, and Herrington's effort to locate, travel to, and get them in front of his camera includes anecdotes of despair, hilarity and adventure.

Jim will start with a very brief encapsulation of his 35 year photography career, will touch on the history of the individual Climbers pictured, the history of their era in general, and will also discuss the travels and travails undertook to complete this far-flung project.

What is it like to be 98 years old and to look back at an uncompromising life spent in the “useless” quest of first ascents, usually far from home and hearth? The momentum and vigor of youth is not an ideal recipe for introspection, but ones final years certainly suffice. Herrington learned as much about himself as he did his subjects during the project. The cost and reward of obsession, and how to live in the present.

Jim began this series shooting with black-and-white analog film, yet during the course of the project, with the advent of digital photography, it looked as if film would disappear completely—like hemp rope or hobnail boots. Indeed, at times it was difficult to know which would vanish first, the climbers he was photographing or the film he was using. Luckily, film got an eleventh hour reprieve, and he was pleased to be able to shoot the entirety of this book on silver nitrate, which remains his chosen method of taking pictures to this day.

Herrington will recount what it was like to step into these people’s homes, their lives, and their history. Seemingly time-traveling from the classic mountaineering literature he devoured as a young boy into the living rooms of these aging legends, this is his rogue’s gallery, a sampling of, and an ode to, an era.

The Climbers, published in October 2017, received both the Grand Prize and the Mountaineering History Award at the 2017 Banff Film & Book Festival.

Date: Monday, February 26

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid academic ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call 212.628.8383.

New York WILD Film Festival


The New York WILD Film Festival is the first annual documentary film festival in New York to showcase a spectrum of topics, from exploration and adventure to wildlife, conservation and the environment, bringing all things WILD to one of the most urban cities in the world.

2018 Festival Films

New York WILD Film Festival


The New York WILD Film Festival is the first annual documentary film festival in New York to showcase a spectrum of topics, from exploration and adventure to wildlife, conservation and the environment, bringing all things WILD to one of the most urban cities in the world.

2018 Festival Films

New York WILD Film Festival


The New York WILD Film Festival is the first annual documentary film festival in New York to showcase a spectrum of topics, from exploration and adventure to wildlife, conservation and the environment, bringing all things WILD to one of the most urban cities in the world.

2018 Festival Films

New York WILD Film Festival


The New York WILD Film Festival is the first annual documentary film festival in New York to showcase a spectrum of topics, from exploration and adventure to wildlife, conservation and the environment, bringing all things WILD to one of the most urban cities in the world.

2018 Festival Films

Hold - Main Line School Night Tour - 1:00 pm

Hold - Main Line School Night Tour - 1 pm

Garrett

See Ann

Garrett

See Ann

Club Closed - President's Day

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Nycmer Event

Hold - Bahamas Night

Tent- Michael Aw Visting Explorer

In the Gallery - See Ann

Spence School_Second Floor

Public Lecture Series with Andrew Rowen

1492 Retold: A Bicultural Reexamination of Columbus’s Epic Voyage

Andrew Rowen is the author of Encounters Unforeseen: 1492 Retold, which dramatizes the history of Columbus’s epic voyage and first encounters with Native Americans from a bicultural perspective, presenting Native American beliefs, thoughts, and actions side by side with those of Columbus and other Europeans, all closely based on primary sources and anthropological studies.

Rowen’s talk explores how and why the encounters in 1492 and 1493 enfolded as they did from both peoples’ perspectives. He will summarize geographical, social, and religious beliefs and practices of the Taíno chieftains and peoples who met Columbus side by side those of Columbus and Spain’s Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand. Building on this background, he will examine how these beliefs and practices played out in a few of the encounters’ key moments as Columbus’s voyage of “discovery” traveled about the Caribbean in 1492. None of the participants could discern the violence and battlegrounds of the ensuing centuries, and a key question for them was whether the other peoples would be friend or enemy.

The talk will then turn to examine the entirety of the encounters from the Native American perspective, including the Taíno “discovery” of Europe in 1493, when Columbus brings Taíno captives back to Spain, as well as the chieftains’ reactions to the abusive garrison of seamen Columbus then left behind in the Caribbean. A conceptual framework for a European subjugation of the Americas is then set, and the chieftains begin to perceive that possibility.

Rowen is a U.C. Berkeley and Harvard Law graduate who practiced law as a partner of a major New York City law firm for almost 30 years. He devoted six years to researching the underlying historical record and visiting nearly all the Caribbean, European, and Atlantic locations where the action takes place, including the archaeological sites where the Taíno chieftains lived in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Date: Monday, February 12

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Lia Christina Schimizzi - Private Event

KM

Visting Explorer - Manuel Jose Carpintero

Gallery
See Ann

Visiting Explorer Program with Manuel José Carpintero Manzanares

66º33' south. The dream of the Antarctic Circle

Manuel José Carpintero Manzanares,
President of the Astronomical and Geographical Society of Ciudad Real (Spain)


“There is no law below 40 degrees South; and there is no God below 50 degrees South”
—Old whale hunter’s quote.

Manuel José Carpintero Manzanares, teacher and explorer, is the president and founder of the Astronomical and Geographical Society of Ciudad Real (Spain). He will tell us about his epic adventure sailing the most dangerous seas on Earth, captaining the world-first expedition to reach the Antarctic Circle in a small sailboat only 14 meters in length, without previous stops.

"We have arrived, gentlemen." Those are the words that Manuel pronounced when the GPS digital scoreboard on the ship read 66º33 South. The mythical figure that indicates the beginning of a magical place, different, almost from another world: the Antarctic Circle, where words freeze. In the eyes of the seven crew members of the Santa María polar ship they were reflected cold, hunger, sleep, fatigue, fear and, above all, uncertainty.

This is the story of 5 men from Castilla-La Mancha of the Astronomical and Geographic Society at Ciudad Real (Spain) who are trying to reach the Antarctic Circle, the 66 degrees and 33 minutes South, on board a boat of only 14 meters: Manuel Jose Carpintero, Víctor Gómez, Laureano Serna, Francisco Ruiz and Jorge Pérez.

At 13,000 km from their homes, at the southern tip of South America, the challenge began. It was a journey of around 2,000 nautical miles, which took them through the Beagle Channel, and then through two places most feared by sailors: Cape Horn and the Drake Passage. All this to get to the Polar Circle and then along the Antarctic Peninsula, a hard trip of more than a month.

On expedition, they also managed the first videoconference in history between individuals in the Antarctic and those in space, connecting with the astronaut Michael López Alegria.

This is the story of that incredible adventure.

Date: February 9, 2018

Time: 6:30 pm

Location: Explorers Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $15

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Elon Moth - Film Screening - 3 Short VR

Hold - William Polk Event

Himalaya Bound: One Family’s Quest to Save Their Animals & An Ancient Way of Life

Explorers Club Public Lecture Series with Michael Benanav

The Van Gujjars are nomadic water buffalo herders who live in the forests and mountains of northern India. Traditionally, they dwell in the wilderness, where their world revolves around the feeding and well-being of their animals. They spend the winter months in the lowland jungles of the Shivalik Hills, where thick foliage provides plenty of fodder for the buffaloes. Each April, however, temperatures there soar above 110 degrees; the leaves and grasses wither and die; creeks run dry. With nothing left for their animals to eat or drink, the Van Gujjars must move. Entire families, from infants to the elderly, trek with their herds up into the Himalayas, where melting snows reveal lush alpine meadows laced by gurgling streams. When the cold sets in at the end of September, they head back down to the Shivaliks, where the jungle has sprung back to life following the monsoon rains. The tribe has followed this cycle of seasonal migration - up in summer, down in winter, shunning settled village life - for over a thousand years.

Van Gujjars have deep personal relationships with their water buffaloes: they think of them as family members, like sons and daughters or brothers and sisters. They readily sacrifice their own comfort for that of their buffaloes. If a buffalo falls ill, Van Gujjars are wracked with concern; if one dies, they mourn for it as though it were human. They never eat their animals or sell them for slaughter, keeping them only for their milk – and though they are Muslim, they are also vegetarian, averse to the idea of killing living creatures.

But things are changing. While about 30,000 Van Gujjars still live in the wilderness today, the existential challenges they face may drive nearly all of them out of the forests over the next couple of generations. The main threat to their way of life has been the designation of their traditional lands as national parks - from which the government has attempted, often successfully, to evict the nomads and settle them in villages, turning them into wheat farmers.

In 2009, author and photojournalist Michael Benanav embedded himself with one Van Gujjar family to document their annual spring migration. He lived with them for 44 days, walking with them, herding buffaloes with them, sharing their food, sleeping under their tents, and becoming much more a part of the family than he ever expected. He came to know them well – their joys and their troubles, their hopes and fears for the future, and their perspectives on their place in the world.

Benanav’s new book, Himalaya Bound: One Family’s Quest to Save Their Animals and an Ancient Way of Life (January 2018, Pegasus) offers an intimate glimpse into the rarely-seen world of the Van Gujjars. For this event, he will take you along on a photographic journey of their migration into the Himalayas, featuring extraordinary images of nomadic life in the forests and mountains of north India. And he will delve into the dilemmas faced by the family he traveled with, as government authorities threatened to ban them from the alpine meadows where they have lived in summers for many generations.

Benanav is the author of three books, including Men Of Salt: Crossing the Sahara on the Caravan of White Gold, for which he traveled 1000 miles with one of the last working camel caravans on earth. His work, including articles and images from five continents, appears in The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Geographical Magazine, Sierra Magazine, Lonely Planet, and more. His photos have been featured on 60 Minutes, in National Geographic Books’ Rarely Seen: Images of the Extraordinary, and at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, in New Delhi. He is also the founder of Traditional Cultures Project, an educational non-profit that documents traditional and indigenous cultures around the world.

Date: Monday, February 5

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

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Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste