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Coleen’s Event

Empowers Africa

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes Event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

Hold - Milnes event

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

Hold - Clark Room for a Henson Dinner

Hold - Holiday Party

Carl Safina Dinner Second Floor

American Prairie Reserve_Second Floor_1-5pm

Hold - Sea Stories 2016

Arizona State University Second Floor

Richard Bangs Event

Hold - Milnes Event

Hold - Milnes Event, per Will request

Hold - Polar Film Festival

Hold - Polar Film Festival

Hold - Space Stories

Hold - Clark Room for Wings Forum

Hold - Clark Room for Wings Forum, Will email request on 1/25

Hold - Elena Clark Foundation Event - Trophy Room

Date: October 25th

Hold - Sail Stories - Sean Holland Event

Hold - Sail Stories - Sean Holland Event, per his request on 12/14 -KM

Hold - Carlton Ward Film Screening

Hold - Clark Room & Trophy Room - Artist-in-Exploration Events

Hold - Heinlein Prize Event / Kellie - 9am- 3pm

Hold - Christine Dennison - Brazilian Naval League Event

American Museum of Fly Fishing Dinner_Second Floor

Hold - Octoberfest

Whitney Savignano Cocktail Reception Second Floor

Hold - Milnes Event

Hold - Milnes Event, per Will request

Hold - Milnes Event

Hold - Milnes Event, per Will request

Faayna Rose

Kathi Lynn Austin at The Explorers Club

Kathi Lynn Austin rhino lecture / film premiere booked in the Clark Room. 6-9pm. Per Andrew, Will, and Brian Gaisford.

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5

Julie Chase

Hold - David Petraeus Netherlands Club Event

Hold - Melissa Lam Event - Ion Pacific Limited

From Will email, April 5th

Summer BBQ

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Z: The Beginning of Everything - Film Shoot

Hold - Summer BBQ

Phil Arad Cocktail Reception Second Floor

B. Janulis - Duke Hold

-Tentative Hold-
Board Room 3pm - 5pm
2nd Floor Reception 5:30 - 8:30

BB

Hamilton College

Columbia University_Second Floor_Evening

Matthew Robbins

Hold - Exploration Expo

The 2016 West Coast Explorers Club Annual Dinner

It’s time to reserve your place for the 5th Annual West Coast Explorers Club Annual Dinner (WECAD) taking place on Saturday, June 18, 2016 at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California. This event is co-hosted by the Bowers Museum and its President, Dr. Peter Keller FN’84, who extends his own personal welcome to you. David Dolan FN’03 is reprising his role as Chair of WECAD.

The evening will begin with a wine and hors d'oeuvres reception at 6:00 pm in the museum’s beautiful Margaret & Cleo Key Courtyard. The specially catered dinner by Tangata Restaurant dinner will commence at 7:00 pm. Our program and presentations will follow dinner and be held in the Bowers Museum’s Norma Kershaw Auditorium. Business attire is appropriate for this event.

Honorary Explorers Club President Don Walsh MED’61 will be speaking on the topic of “The Future of Exploration” and best-selling author Martin Dugard will speak about the “Attributes of Explorers,” based upon his book The Explorers: A Story of Fearless Outcasts, Blundering Geni-uses, and Impossible Success. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Professor Greg Rouse FN’16 and Dewy White AM’15 will return their Explorers Club Flag that accompanied them on their extremely successful Flag Expedition off the coast of Australia, which was the subject of a recent front page story in the San Diego Union.

This event is also the official public "kick off" for the 2016 Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner (LTAD) to be held in Santa Barbara on October 15th. LTAD Chair Kristin Larson FN’02 will be on hand to provide us with the latest developments of this exciting weekend. The theme for this year’s LTAD is “Celebrating the Legacy of Open Spaces.”

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the incorporation of the Southern California Chapter of the Explorers Club. We will fully celebrate our half-century, bookended by our June 18th West Coast Explorers Club Dinner in Santa Ana, and our October 15th Lowell Thomas Awards in Santa Barbara. We hope you plan to join us for both grand celebrations held within the environs of our Southern California Chapter of the Explorers Club.

The event’s tickets are $150.00 per person. The cost for Student Members of the Explorers Club and those 30 years old and younger is $125.00. There is a special Sponsorship price of $500.00 per person for those who wish to make a significant contribution to the programs of the Southern California Chapter. Special recognition and seating will be provided to our Sponsors. Funds over and above the expenses for this special fund raising dinner will be used to support the programs and events of the Southern California Chapter.

To reserve your WECAD tickets, mail your check payable to the “Explorers Club/So Cal,” to the attention to David Dolan, c/o 302 Washington Blvd. #628, San Diego, CA 92103. Please provide us a list of the names in your party. Each table seats up to 10 guests. We will make every effort to honor seating requests. Also, please indicate if there are any special dietary meal require-ments and specify any requests for a vegetarian option for dinner. The deadline to receive checks is June 8th. Simultaneously with mailing your check, please email a confirmation of your guest list to David at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Thank you.

If you wish to pay by Credit Card instead of by check, you may do so through our account at Brown Paper Tickets, although there is a small transaction fee that’s added to cover the cost of this service.

There are a number of good hotels in the vicinity of the Bowers Museum. We are recommending the Ayers Hotel in the City of Orange located at 200 N.The City Drive, Orange, CA 92868. It is just about 2 miles from the Bowers Museum and has free parking. You may use a special “Bowers Museum Rate” at the Ayers Hotel. The rates are $149 per night for their One King Studio Suite (with sleeper sofa) and $159 per night for our Two Queen Studio Suite, plus 10.195% hotel tax. To make reservations by phone, call: 714-919-7940 or 855-672-9737 and ask for the “Bow-ers Museum” rate. Alternatively, you can book online by clicking here.

This hotel is also close to Disneyland and other tourist attactions and thus fills up quickly in the summer. We recommend that you make your hotel reservations soon during this busy season. If you are flying in for this event, Orange County’s John Wayne Airport (SNA) is the closest airport.

Don’t forget the deadline to receive payment for WECAD tickets is June 8th. No refunds after this deadline. Please make your reservations now as space is limited and this event may sell out prior to June 8h. If you wish to be an event Co-Sponsor, or have any other questions, please contact WECAD Chair David Dolan at: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address), or phone David at (949) 307-9182. See you at the Bowers Museum on June 18th!

Club Librarians Tour

See Lacey

Hold - Film Screening

Hold - Seminar Program - Board Room

Public Lecture Series with Scott McVay, Olivier Adam, and David Rothenberg

THE SONG OF THE WHALE

What We Know and What We Don’t Know

The sounds of the humpback whale were discovered by the US Navy in the 1950s, kept classified for more than a decade, and first analyzed and understood as song in 1970 by Roger Payne and Scott McVay, then presented to the public in the journal Science.

What have we found out about it since then?

It is the longest music sung by any animal (including humans) sometimes lasting up to 24 hours. In any ocean, whales sing the same song, but they evolve it together from year to year. Each ocean has a different song. Only the males sing, so it is assumed it is to attract the attention of females. But no human has ever seen a female whale show any interest in this phenomenon.

Celebrated by musicians from Pete Seeger to Charlie Haden, from Alan Hovhaness to George Crumb, the song of the humpback whale remains a mystery beloved of humans, and it is this musical ability of these magnificent creatures that led people all over the planet to rally to save them in the 1970s.

Join three people at the heart of this journey to learn what we know and what we don’t know about the song of the humpback whale, sixty years after its initial discovery.

Scott McVay, born 1933, the co-discoverer of the song of the humpback whale, formerly Executive Director of the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and Founding Director of the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, past president of Chatauqua, a veritable survivor of the field of whale research and conservation, just published his memoir SURPRISE ENCOUNTERS WITH ARTISTS AND SCIENTISTS, WHALES AND OTHER LIVING THINGS. He will tell us what it felt like to first figure out that the whales were singing structured phrases and patterns, and how he has followed this story for nearly fifty years.

Olivier Adam, Professor of neuroscience at University of Paris Orsay, visiting professor at Mt Sinai Hospital Physiology Lab, is working on figuring out exactly how humpback whales make their sounds. No air leaves the whale… but he thinks he has figured out how they do it.

David Rothenberg, professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, author of THOUSAND MILE SONG, about playing music live with whales, and the just released NEW SONGS OF THE HUMPBACK WHALE, an attempt to update the original SONGS OF THE HUMPBACK WHALE, released by the New York Zoological Society in 1970 and still the best-selling nature recording of all time. In the new project Rothenberg, together with ex-Google visualizer Michael Deal, have figured out a whole new way to visually explain the songs of whales.

The song of the whale makes some people laugh, moves others to tears, and we still have hardly any idea what it is for. Join us as we share the latest exciting discoveries on what’s going on deep in our oceans. As Pete Seeger sang:

I didn’t just hear grunting,
I didn’t just hear squeaks,
I didn’t just hear bellows,
I didn’t just hear shrieks.
It was the musical singing
And the passionate wail
That came from the heart
Of the world’s last whale.


Rothenberg playing live with whales
His new visualization of the humpback song
A humpback whale song recorded in Madagascar by Olivier Adam
Scott McVay speaking on his work with whales at the World Science Festival
McVay’s new book

Date: Monday, June 13th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 x.10, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hōkūle’a Event

A symbol of cultural revival, the history of Hōkūleʻa is being shared on this journey to inspire other indigenous cultures. This replica of an ancient Polynesian voyaging canoe was built 40 years ago and revitalized voyaging and navigation traditions throughout the Pacific. The canoe also sparked a reawakening of Hawaiian culture, language, and identity. Hōkūle‘a first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind. The canoe’s twin hulls allow her to handle large ocean swells and recover easily in the troughs of waves, and her triangular canvas sails can harness winds up to 20 knots.



Presidential Dinner in honor of the Hōkūle’a

In honor of the arrival of the Hōkūle’a coinciding with World Oceans Day, The Explorers Club United Nations Committee cordially invites you to a special Presidential Dinner featuring Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson, the President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, along with crew members Lehua Kamalu & Jenna Ishii, on Friday the 10th of June.

A symbol of cultural revival, the history of Hōkūleʻa is being shared to inspire other indigenous cultures. This replica of an ancient Polynesian voyaging canoe was built 40 years ago and revitalized voyaging and navigation traditions throughout the Pacific. The canoe also sparked a reawakening of Hawaiian culture, language, and identity. Her name means "star of gladness" in Hawaiian, which refers to Arcturus, a guiding zenith star for Hawaiian navigators. Arcturus passes directly overhead at Hawaiʻi's latitude helping sailors find the islands.

Hōkūle‘a first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind. The canoe’s twin hulls allow her to handle large ocean swells and recover easily in the troughs of waves, and her triangular canvas sails can harness winds up to 20 knots.



Nainoa Thompson is the President of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and a master in the traditional Polynesian art of non-instrument navigating. Inspired by his kupuna, his teachers, he has dedicated his life to exploring the deep meaning of “voyaging.” Among many other important mentors, Yosio Kawano took him at an early age to tide pools to explore the mysteries of the inshore ocean; Herb Kane introduced him to the stars his ancestors used to navigate great ocean distances; and pwo navigator Mau Piailug taught him to see the natural signs he would use to guide Hōkūleʻa throughout Polynesia. Nainoa’s father taught him the universal values of voyaging – of having a vision of islands rising from the sea, of self-discipline, preparation, courage, risk-taking and the spirit of aloha that would bind a crew on arduous journeys.

He will be joined by Lehua Kamalu, Voyaging Assistant for the Polynesian Voyaging Society, and Jenna Ishii, Education Coordinator for PVS. The crew will return Club Flag #124, which they carried on multiple legs of the worldwide journey. Several foreign dignitaries and other notable attendees are expected to join the proceedings, and the Hawaiian Air Serenaders and Dancers will preform live.

Date: June 10th, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Dinner, 8:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $70

Guest Ticket Price: $80

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

As this is a catered event, no cancellations will be accepted by Monday, June 6th

Hold - D&C Victory Launch Party - 2nd Floor

Hold - Dent the Future Event - Clark Room

Per Will request at end of day on 4/11/16

Hold - Clark Foundation Prado Event

Public Lecture Series with Ed Warner

Running with Rhinos

Stories from a Radical Conservationist

Why would a wealthy former oil/natural gas explorationist and geologist from Colorado repeatedly go to Africa — not for white-gloves-and-high-tea safaris or choreographed big game hunting expeditions, but to risk life and limb in the bush, alongside a colorful cast of dedicated veterinarians, biologists, and locals? To make a real difference and to help save some of nature’s most majestic and most endangered creatures—the rhinoceros.

On one side of the world, the rhinos are dying. Last year, 1200 were killed by poachers in South Africa alone.

Warner will recount his experiences from more than a decade of exceedingly dangerous volunteer work in Africa with such organizations as the World Wildlife Fund’s Rhino Conservancy Project (or “Rhino Ops”), the Sand County Foundation, and the International Rhino Foundation. Informing all of his work is Warner’s core philosophy of radical conservation: that when both the land and landowner flourish and end up better because of their partnership, there is conservation—but when one or the other does not flourish, there is not.

From jet-washing a sedated rhino and helping to drill its horn for a transmitter implant, to close encounters with elephants, pythons, wild dogs, lions, and a host of larger-than-life human characters, Warner paints vivid and entertaining pictures of his experiences in Africa. His voice is as earthy as the land and work he so loves, and he tells his stories in a style befitting his own Damon Runyon-esque persona. They are all shared in a new book, Running with Rhinos: My Life as a Radical Conservationist.



Ed Warner is a noted philanthropist and conservationist. In his career as an exploration geologist, he discovered and participated in development of the Jonah/Pinedale Fields, the third largest natural gas accumulation in US history. Since leaving the natural gas business in 2000, he has pursued philanthropy and volunteer work full-time.

“Dr. Warner” earned a BS from Colorado State University, an MS from UCLA, and an honorary doctorate from Colorado State. In 2005, Colorado State named the College of Natural Resources after him. He has lectured on geology and cooperative conservation at numerous universities. He also writes book reviews for the Denver-based Bloomsbury Review.

Currently, Warner is a Trustee of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, a Director of the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and the Sand County Foundation. Part of his present volunteer work involves underwater coral reef surveys on remote islands in Indonesia and Micronesia with the Nature Conservancy. His previous service includes having been a Trustee of the Geological Society of America Foundation and the American Geological Institute Foundation.

Date: Monday, June 6th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Richard Garriott Trophy Room Dinner

Hold - Hokulea Flag Return - Ann Passer

Young Explorers Program

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM in Clark Room
Martin Kraus & Richard Garriott

Presidential Dinner with Julian Monroe Fisher

"Fisher's expeditions across the planet have done far more than tick off feats of mega-trekking prowess, they are essential aspects of his ethnological and geographic research."

— National Geographic

Spanning three decades of exploration around the globe, Explorer and Anthropologist Julian Monroe Fisher has focused his attention in the last years on Africa where he conducted six Explorers Club Flag expeditions. His work has led him into interesting cultural and geographical corners of the continent while researching a wide range of complex and compelling topics.

The Sir Samuel and Lady Florence Baker Historical Trail is a 500 mile hiking trail established by Fisher during his '2012-2016 Great African Expedition'. The historical route leads village to village from the South Sudanese capital city of Juba into Uganda to the top of Murchison Falls. It connects fifteen geographic points along the route taken by the 19th century explorer Sir Samuel White Baker and his fellow explorer/wife during their search for Lake Albert. Fisher intent is to bring attention to the historically significant locations, the rich cultural diversity of the African kingdoms and a positive spin on an area that today is war torn and disregarded by the media. Since its inauguration in 2014, Fisher's Baker Trail has been highlighted in publications such as National Geographic, CNN Online and Red Bull Magazine.

Other feats of African exploration include the film entitled, 'Primate Questions of Conservation', produced by Fisher and his team in 2007, which explores the thin line between wildlife conservation, in particular that of the primates in Central Africa, and the preservation of the rights, the freedom and the survival of those indigenous people that share the same living space.

In 2008 Fisher was accredited by the Uganda Wildlife Authority for establishing a new trail route in the Rwenzori National Park, the fabled Mountains of the Moon. Fisher and a team of Ugandans explored the water flows from the Rwenzori glaciers to proof Fisher's theory that those glaciers are a source of the River Nile. The team followed the Lamia River successfully down to the Semliki River, on into Lake Albert and north to the River Nile.



Under an official mandate from the Congolese King of Katanga Mwami Mwenda Bantu M'siri Godefroid Munongo Jr., current President of the Forum of African Kings and Traditional chiefs, Fisher searched for the lost skull of King Msiri, the ancestor of King Mwami, during his 2009-2010 'Journey to Katanga' expedition. King Msiri was decapitated by the Captain William Grant Stair's Expedition to Katanga in 1890-91 when King Leopold II sent arguably a team of mercenaries into the Congolese province of Katanga to plant the Free State flag for Belgium. The results of the search for the lost skull of Msiri which were presented to the Kingdom of Katanga and to The Royal Geographical Society of Scotland, opened more questions than answers. Fisher continues to support the kingdom in establishing the Bunkeya Cultural Village to celebrate the rich history and cultural heritage of the Garanganze people of Katanga, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Fisher's most recent projects also include establishing a new hiking trail in the Karamoja region of northern Uganda as well as a new expedition retracing Henry Morton Stanley's last expeditionary route along the Aruwimi River through the Ituri Forest of the Congo.

Julian Monroe Fisher is a Fellow of The Explorers Club and a Fellow with The Royal Geographical Society and a member of the American Anthropological Association.

julianmonroefisher.com

Date: June 2nd, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Dinner, 8:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $70

Guest Ticket Price: $80

Reservation Notes:

Reservations must be procured in advance for a catered dinner, and payment must accompany reservation. There will be no cancellations allowed after Friday, May 27th, 2016. Non-members are welcome to reserve a seat as the nominal guest of Daryl Hawk MR ’98, organizer of the Presidential Dinner.

Click here to purchase tickets online

To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Panthera Meeting_Trophy Room/Board Room_Daytime

Hold - Orbital Outfitters Event

Club Closed - Memorial Day

Explorers Club Headquarters will be closed today, Monday, May 30th, in honor of Memorial Day. We will resume regular operating hours on Tuesday, May 31st, at 9:00 am.

HOLD FOR CLARK ROOM FOR LUIS MUGA

HOLD FOR CLARK ROOM FOR LUIS MUGA (with Alexander Doba)

Date: 05-28-16

Garriott - Filming

Lounge, 10-4. See Chris.

Martin Kraus - Board Room

UNH Meeting Map Room 5pm

UNH Cocktail Reception_Second Floor

Public Lecture Series with Daryl Hawk

Sacred Places of the World

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

For the past 30 years, explorer and documentary photographer Daryl Hawk has traveled alone to some of the most remote places in the world telling stories with his camera. He spends weeks at a time documenting and immersing himself in different cultures and landscapes. He is a passionate defender of the world’s remaining wilderness areas and uses his photography to shine a light on why we need to protect them.

Mr. Hawk will be highlighting sacred landscapes with powerful nature, environmental portraits of indigenous cultures, ancient monastaries, etc. from faraway places such as the Arctic, Antarctica, the Andes, Patagonia, Bolivia, Ladakh, India, New Zealand, Bhutan and much more. Mountains, deserts, lakes, rivers, rain forests, forests, tundra have always been locations with intense beauty for him to photograph. These are sites of ceremony , spiritual inspiration and learning and always a primary goal to seek out on his long journeys.

However, sacred lands are more than esoteric, spiritual sanctuaries – these places protect biodiversity. The indigenous cultures that inhabit these lands represent a universitality of values that honor the sacred dimension of land and water. They practice reciprocity, reverence, respect and relationship on a daily basis viewing themselves as part of the earth, not superior to it.

Mr. Hawk will discuss his role as a documentary photographer and the need to continue to create awareness of key environmental and conservation issues. He will discuss his style, techniques, approach to subject matter, and how he plans and researches expeditions. “I like looking for wild country to be young in where my mind can run free and fast with the constant visual stimulation I experience from dawn to dusk – always seeking and searching for something new and different.”

His articles and stories often appear in magazines and newspapers worldwide. He has been featured several times on NBC’s Today Show and Fox 5 television. He has been a member of the Explorers Club for 20 years, a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and member of the Professional Photographers Association

He is the former host and producer of the cablevision television show “The Unconventional Traveler” which featured some of the world’s leading explorers, travel photographers and filmmakers sharing their work from various expeditions and documentaries. He produces over 100 shows over a ten year period. Some of his guests included Buzz Aldrin, Jane Goodall, George Schaller, and George Butler.

Additonally, he has published four books. The first, “Distant Journeys” consists of 200 color images from around the world. His other books include “Quiet Moments”, “White Pond” and “Manhattan.” For more information on Daryl Hawk, please visit his website at darylhawk.com.

Date: May 23, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - SCI / Frank Zitz event

Special Event - Mongolia Night

Join us for an extraordinary Mongolian celebration!

On Friday, May 20th, in conjunction with the Permanent Mission of Mongolia to the United Nations, The Explorers Club will celebrate the unique culture and heritage of Mongolia. His Excellency, Sukhbold Sukhee, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary and Permanent Representative of Mongolia to the United Nations will be joining us and offering remarks. A traditional, full sized ger (a round tent used for nomadic travel) complete with authentic furniture will be set up on the Terrace, Mongolian artwork will be displayed throughout the building, as well as traditional clothing and Mongolian games.

Entertainment includes a Mongolian Horsehead Fiddler, traditional singers and dancers, and a Mongolian calligrapher will be on hand exhibiting the beautiful brushwork of Mongolian calligraphy. Tasting stations of traditional Mongolian foods and vodkas will also be available throughout the evening.

Join us for this exciting and educational evening, and please purchase your tickets early as tickets are selling fast and we expect this event to sell out!

Date: Friday, May 20th, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets on eventbrite

This event is $50 for members and guests. You may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) to secure a place.

As this is a catered event, there will be no cancellations after Tuesday, May 17th.

Photos courtesy of B.Bayar

T. Janulis Hold - Potential Club Event

Tentative Hold, see Britt.
Jenna said she was cancelling the Becky Yang cocktail reception and we could hold the space.

Chapter Event - Southwest

Dr. Jut Wynne - The Race to Save the Endemic Insects of Easter Island

About 800 years ago, Rapa Nui (Easter Island) underwent a massive ecological shift. The island was converted from a lush subtropical palm dominated woodland to a grassland. Timed with the arrival of the ancient Polynesians, a fragile environment and human pressures resulted island-wide extinctions of most plant and animal species. Dr. Jut Wynne has studied the relict fauna of Rapa Nui since 2008. He and colleagues discovered several endemic invertebrates - all new to science and now restricted to Rapa Nui caves. Join him as he discusses how these animals were able to eke out a living under-ground, the e¬fforts underway to protect the most vulnerable cave animals, and an over-view on his upcoming three-month expedition to study some of the most imperiled insect species on the planet.

Date: Thursday, May 19th

Time: 6:30 pm

Location: The Green Room, 15 N. Agassiz St., Flagstaff, AZ 86001

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: Free

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are not required for this event.

For more information, contact Joel Dugdale:

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
928.486.2984

Hold - 10 am - Steve Burnett tour with kids

Scott Hamilton Board Room

Hold - Adam Gordon - 2nd Floor - Evening

Hold - Elena Clark Foundation Event

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Max Graham - CANCELLED

Space for Giants

The Challenges and Rewards of Managing a Conservation Organization in Africa

Dr. Max Graham is a British wildlife conservationist who founded Space for Giants in 2011 and is now its CEO. The Kenyan-based charity works tirelessly to provide a secure future for elephants, the places they live and the species that share their range. His talk will explore the development and work of Space for Giants, and the challenges and opportunities of conservation efforts in Africa.

Intertwined with his personal story will be a description of how he and the Space for Giants team created new refuges for wildlife and supports frontline protection for Africa’s most vulnerable populations of elephants– 100 are killed every single day for their ivory, fueling war and terrorism in Africa. If this is allowed to continue, elephants will become extinct from most of their range within the next 10 years. Dr. Graham has some fascinating stories about the African nations and presidential palaces he has visited along with Space for Giant’s Patron Evgeny Lebedev; deploying GPS collars on elephants; watching stock piles of ivory being destroyed in Ethiopia; and finding the carcass of one of his best known elephants who had been killed by poachers.

In addition, Dr. Graham will discuss the Giants Club, described as one of the most important elephant protection initiatives of our time. This exclusive membership forum brings together African political leaders, executives of natural resource extraction companies operating in Africa and key global influencers to secure Africa’s remaining elephant populations and the landscapes they depend on.



Max is a fluent Kiswahili speaker who has worked on environment and development projects in Afghanistan, Ecuador, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Gabon. He has been involved in elephant research and conservation since 2000 and in 2006 was awarded a PhD from the University of Cambridge for his research on human-elephant conflict. He has published numerous scientific papers on elephant behaviour, human-elephant conflict and wildlife conservation and in 2012 became a member of the IUCN African Elephant Specialist Group. He has been based in north Kenya for more than a decade.

Date: Monday, May 16th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Deidre Brennan

Seminar Series - Chris Nicola


Chris Nicola, FR ’04


On May 10, 2016, noted speleologist Chris Nicola, FR ’04 will discuss needed knowledge in cave exploration based on over 40 years of caving and leading more than 40 international expeditions. Chris will discuss cave exploration in terms of environment, principals, practices, techniques and equipment. As Chris points out, environments can range from narrow cold, wet crawlways with low air space requiring submersion in water for extended periods of time, to large dry cavernous rooms requiring either climbing high bare walls, or the rappelling in deep pits on the order of several hundred feet. Caves can contain rare fragile artifacts, snakes looking for cooler temperatures, one-of-a-kind cave-adapted organisms, toxic air pockets, or thousands of bats. Floors and walls can be solid, or teetering on collapse with just the slightest of wrong moves. But all caves are dark and remote. You might be just 40 feet below an ambulance but as much as 360 miles to the entrance giving access to that same ambulance. High humidity, airborne particulates of guano, and fatigue can lead to hypothermia, histoplasmosis, and injuries, some life threatening in nature. This ‘hands-on’ session will acquaint Members with the gear associated with ascending/descending, maneuvering, scientific collection, mapping techniques and ways to survive extended periods underground, while ensuring not only their own safety, but that of the cave itself and its contents.


Photo by Steven Duncan, Copyright Chris Nicola 2005


Exploration Seminars Program

As in the past, the Club’s more experienced and accomplished Members will address practical field needs and disciplines directly relevant to exploration. The common goal of the series is to contribute and expand field knowledge in a ‘show me how to’ format, with several sessions providing a ‘hands on’ approach.

Please note the Exploration Seminars are for Members only, without charge, but reservations are required due to limited seating in the Board Room. Members wishing to attend should call the Club Receptionist at (212) 628-8383, xt. 10, to secure space.

For further information regarding the seminars, or to suggest future topics and speakers, please contact Daniel A. Kobal, Ph.D. FE’89 directly at (718) 757-7996 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Alberto Villoldo

Storming Heaven

The Healers and Sages of the Andes

At 18,000 feet in the Andes every step is a meditation. You feel as if in a dream, and wake up to find yourself in another dream. One moment you are in a blinding blizzard, a white-out, and the next the sun is cornea-searing bright.

Dr. Alberto Villoldo had come to study the sages of the Andes, the last of the wisdom keepers that many believed had vanished at the time of the Spanish Conquest of Peru. They had only been “re-discovered” recently by his colleague, Dr. Chavez Ballon, then chief archeologist at Machu Picchu. He was joining these sages on their annual pilgrimage to Mt. Ausagate. Right before the final ascent to the glacier, they removed their ponchos and tied-on strings of Spanish moss, as they danced ecstatically masquerading as the mythical ‘pre-worldly beings’ that once roamed their land. Some would die as they gyrated at the summit of the nearly 21,000 foot-high glacier.

In this richly illustrated presentation Alberto will share the cosmology of the Andean peoples, the concept of ‘ayni’ or right relationship, and the magical world view of the shamans who live pre-Columbian in villages above the clouds in central Peru. He has spent more than 25 years studying the Andean paq’os.

The Andean sages believe that they can dream with their eyes open, and conjure the world into being newly each day. Alberto will share his images and experiences traveling with sages who were masters of the art of divination and of reading the signs of destiny.

Alberto Villoldo Ph.D. FN ’15 is a psychologist and medical anthropologist who has studied the medicine traditions of the Andes and the Amazon for over thirty years. He began his research among the jungle peoples in the Amazon basin, studying the effects of the ayahuasca, the mythical potion employed by jungle shamans to experience the realm beyond death.

While on the faculty at San Francisco State University, Dr. Villoldo founded and directed the Bio-Self Regulation Laboratory, where he investigated the effects of Shamanic practices on blood and brain chemistry. He is the founder of the Four Winds Society, dedicated to bridging ancient Shamanic healing practices with modern medicine and psychology. He is an adjunct faculty at Columbia University Teachers College.

Alberto Villoldo PhD is author of numerous bestselling books, including The Four Winds, A Shaman's Odyssey into the Amazon; Island of the Sun, the Teachings of the Medicine Wheel; Shaman, Healer, Sage; One Spirit Medicine; and Shamans Miraculous Tools for Healing.

His books have been featured in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and main selections of Doubleday’s Book Clubs.

Date: Monday, May 9th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Chapter Event - Florida

We’re set for a fantastic adventure in Grand Cayman hosted by its US General Consulate Gary Montemayor FI’10! With a full day of adventure and presentations followed by classic Grand Cayman style fine dining, you’re sure to get the most out of your time on the Island.

Dr. Karen Rosenthal DVM, lecturer and Dean of SMU Veterinary School will discuss conservation efforts being done for endangered species native to the Cayman Islands, amongst other subjects. Gary Montemayor FI ’10, submersible pilot and veteran of over 2000 submersible dives, will do a media presentation on the deep Cayman Wall (escarpment) to 2000’.

This lecture will be followed by an investigative journey to explore the wild stingrays led by expert naturalist Jim Goetz. Bathing suits and courage required! A dinner will be held at the Grand Old House, a plantation home on the Ocean.

Saturday, May 7th, 2016

9:00AM – Depart from Cayman Islands Yacht Club for an investigative journey to explore the wild stingrays led by expert naturalist Jim Goetz. Bathing suits and courage required!

4:00PM – Presentations at SMU Medical School: Dr. Karen Rosenthal DVM, lecturer and Dean of SMU Veterinary School will discuss conservation efforts being done for endangered species native to the Cayman Islands, among other subjects. Gary Montemayor FI’10, submersible pilot and veteran of over 2000 submersible dives, will do a media presentation on the deep Cayman Wall (escarpment) to 2000’.

7:00PM – Oceanfront dining at the Grand Old House, a plantation home on the Ocean.

Expenses: Stingray experience $50, Dinner is self-tab.

Lodging: Grand Cayman offers a variety of lodging at varying rates. Please contact Gary Montemayor (below) for details.

Date: Saturday May 7, 2016

Reservation Notes:

For questions and to RSVP please contact:

Gary Montemayor FI’10
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Addresses:
Cayman Islands Yacht Club, 164 Yacht Drive
St. Matthew’s University, Lime Tree Bay Ave, West Bay, Grand Cayman
The Grand Old House, 648 S Church St, George Town, Cayman Islands

Young Explorers Program

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM in Clark Room
Martin Kraus & Richard Garriott

InterDigital Innovator’s Dinner

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Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste