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Coleen’s Event

Empowers Africa

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

Hold - Clark Room for a Henson Dinner

Hold - Holiday Party

Carl Safina Dinner Second Floor

American Prairie Reserve_Second Floor_1-5pm

Whitney Savignano Dinner Second Floor

Hold - Sea Stories 2016

Arizona State University Second Floor

Hold - Polar Film Festival

Hold - Polar Film Festival

Hold - Space Stories

Hold - Clark Room for Wings Forum

Hold - Clark Room for Wings Forum, Will email request on 1/25

Hold - Elena Clark Foundation Event - Trophy Room

Date: October 25th

Hold - Sail Stories - Sean Holland Event

Hold - Sail Stories - Sean Holland Event, per his request on 12/14 -KM

Hold - Carlton Ward Film Screening

Hold - Clark Room & Trophy Room - Artist-in-Exploration Events

Hold - Heinlein Prize Event / Kellie - 9am- 3pm

Hold - Christine Dennison - Brazilian Naval League Event

American Museum of Fly Fishing Dinner_Second Floor

Hold - Octoberfest

Faayna Rose

Julie Chase

Hold - Melissa Lam Event - Ion Pacific Limited

From Will email, April 5th

Summer BBQ

Hold - Summer BBQ

Hold - Summer BBQ

B. Janulis - Duke Hold

-Tentative Hold-
Board Room 3pm - 5pm
2nd Floor Reception 5:30 - 8:30

BB

Hamilton College

Columbia University_Second Floor_Evening

Matthew Robbins

Hold - Duke U event

Hold - Hōkūle’a

Hold - Seminar Program - Board Room

Public Lecture Series with Scott McVay, Olivier Adam, and David Rothenberg

THE SONG OF THE WHALE

What We Know and What We Don’t Know

The song of the humpback whale was discovered by the US Navy in the 1950s, kept classified for more than a decade, and first presented to the general public at The Explorers Club in 1970 by Roger Payne and Scott McVay.

What have we found out about it since then?

It is the longest music sung by any animal (including humans) sometimes lasting up to 24 hours. In any ocean, whales sing the same song, but they evolve it together from year to year. Each ocean has a different song. Only the males sing, so it is assumed it is to attract the attention of females. But no human has ever seen a female whale show any interest in this phenomenon.

Celebrated by musicians from Pete Seeger to Charlie Haden, from the Partridge Family to George Crumb, the song of the humpback whale remains a mystery beloved of humans, and it is the single quality of these magnificent creatures that led people all over the planet to rally to save them.

Join three people at the heart of this journey to learn what we know and what we don’t know about the song of the humpback whale, sixty years after its initial discovery.

Scott McVay, born 1932, the co-discoverer of the song of the humpback whale, formerly Executive Director of the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and Founding Director of the Robert Sterling Clark Foundation, past president of Chatauqua, a veritable survivor of the field of whale research and conservation, just published his memoir SURPRISE ENCOUNTERS. He will tell us what it felt like to first figure out that the whales were singing structured phrases and songs, and how he has followed this story for nearly fifty years.

Olivier Adam, Professor of neuroscience at University of Paris Orsay, visiting professor at Mt Sinai Hospital Physiology Lab, is working on figuring out exactly how humpback whales make their sounds. No air leaves the whale… but he thinks he has figured out how they do it.

David Rothenberg, professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, author of THOUSAND MILE SONG, about playing music live with whales, and the just released NEW SONGS OF THE HUMPBACK WHALE, an attempt to update the original SONGS OF THE HUMPBACK WHALE, released by Scott McVay in 1970 and the best-selling nature recording of all time. In the new project Rothenberg, together with ex-Google visualizer Michael Deal, have figured out a whole new way to visually explain the songs of whales.

The song of the whale makes some people laugh, moves others to tears, and we still have hardly any idea what it is for. Join us as we share the latest exciting discoveries on what’s going on deep in our oceans. As Pete Seeger sang:

I didn’t just hear grunting,
I didn’t just hear squeaks,
I didn’t just hear bellows,
I didn’t just hear shrieks.
It was the musical singing
And the passionate wail
That came from the heart
Of the world’s last whale.


Rothenberg playing live with whales
His new visualization of the humpback song
A humpback whale song recorded in Madagascar by Olivier Adam
Scott McVay speaking on his work with whales at the World Science Festival
McVay’s new book

Date: Monday, June 13th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 x.10, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hold - Hōkūle’a

Tentative, per Ann Passer 5/2

Hold - D&C Victory Launch Party - 2nd Floor

Hold - Dent the Future Event - Clark Room

Per Will request at end of day on 4/11/16

Hold - Clark Foundation Prado Event

Public Lecture Series with Ed Warner

Running with Rhinos

Stories from a Radical Conservationist

Why would a wealthy former oil/natural gas explorationist and geologist from Colorado repeatedly go to Africa — not for white-gloves-and-high-tea safaris or choreographed big game hunting expeditions, but to risk life and limb in the bush, alongside a colorful cast of dedicated veterinarians, biologists, and locals? To make a real difference and to help save some of nature’s most majestic and most endangered creatures—the rhinoceros.

On one side of the world, the rhinos are dying. Last year, 1200 were killed by poachers in South Africa alone.

Warner will recount his experiences from more than a decade of exceedingly dangerous volunteer work in Africa with such organizations as the World Wildlife Fund’s Rhino Conservancy Project (or “Rhino Ops”), the Sand County Foundation, and the International Rhino Foundation. Informing all of his work is Warner’s core philosophy of radical conservation: that when both the land and landowner flourish and end up better because of their partnership, there is conservation—but when one or the other does not flourish, there is not.

From jet-washing a sedated rhino and helping to drill its horn for a transmitter implant, to close encounters with elephants, pythons, wild dogs, lions, and a host of larger-than-life human characters, Warner paints vivid and entertaining pictures of his experiences in Africa. His voice is as earthy as the land and work he so loves, and he tells his stories in a style befitting his own Damon Runyon-esque persona. They are all shared in a new book, Running with Rhinos: My Life as a Radical Conservationist.



Ed Warner is a noted philanthropist and conservationist. In his career as an exploration geologist, he discovered and participated in development of the Jonah/Pinedale Fields, the third largest natural gas accumulation in US history. Since leaving the natural gas business in 2000, he has pursued philanthropy and volunteer work full-time.

“Dr. Warner” earned a BS from Colorado State University, an MS from UCLA, and an honorary doctorate from Colorado State. In 2005, Colorado State named the College of Natural Resources after him. He has lectured on geology and cooperative conservation at numerous universities. He also writes book reviews for the Denver-based Bloomsbury Review.

Currently, Warner is a Trustee of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, a Director of the Bird Conservancy of the Rockies and the Sand County Foundation. Part of his present volunteer work involves underwater coral reef surveys on remote islands in Indonesia and Micronesia with the Nature Conservancy. His previous service includes having been a Trustee of the Geological Society of America Foundation and the American Geological Institute Foundation.

Date: Monday, June 6th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Hokulea Flag Return - Ann Passer

Young Explorers Program

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM in Clark Room
Martin Kraus & Richard Garriott

Presidential Dinner with Julian Monroe Fisher

"Fisher's expeditions across the planet have done far more than tick off feats of mega-trekking prowess, they are essential aspects of his ethnological and geographic research."

— National Geographic

Spanning three decades of exploration around the globe, Explorer and Anthropologist Julian Monroe Fisher has focused his attention in the last years on Africa where he conducted six Explorers Club Flag expeditions. His work has led him into interesting cultural and geographical corners of the continent while researching a wide range of complex and compelling topics.

The Sir Samuel and Lady Florence Baker Historical Trail is a 500 mile hiking trail established by Fisher during his '2012-2016 Great African Expedition'. The historical route leads village to village from the South Sudanese capital city of Juba into Uganda to the top of Murchison Falls. It connects fifteen geographic points along the route taken by the 19th century explorer Sir Samuel White Baker and his fellow explorer/wife during their search for Lake Albert. Fisher intent is to bring attention to the historically significant locations, the rich cultural diversity of the African kingdoms and a positive spin on an area that today is war torn and disregarded by the media. Since its inauguration in 2014, Fisher's Baker Trail has been highlighted in publications such as National Geographic, CNN Online and Red Bull Magazine.

Other feats of African exploration include the film entitled, 'Primate Questions of Conservation', produced by Fisher and his team in 2007, which explores the thin line between wildlife conservation, in particular that of the primates in Central Africa, and the preservation of the rights, the freedom and the survival of those indigenous people that share the same living space.

In 2008 Fisher was accredited by the Uganda Wildlife Authority for establishing a new trail route in the Rwenzori National Park, the fabled Mountains of the Moon. Fisher and a team of Ugandans explored the water flows from the Rwenzori glaciers to proof Fisher's theory that those glaciers are a source of the River Nile. The team followed the Lamia River successfully down to the Semliki River, on into Lake Albert and north to the River Nile.



Under an official mandate from the Congolese King of Katanga Mwami Mwenda Bantu M'siri Godefroid Munongo Jr., current President of the Forum of African Kings and Traditional chiefs, Fisher searched for the lost skull of King Msiri, the ancestor of King Mwami, during his 2009-2010 'Journey to Katanga' expedition. King Msiri was decapitated by the Captain William Grant Stair's Expedition to Katanga in 1890-91 when King Leopold II sent arguably a team of mercenaries into the Congolese province of Katanga to plant the Free State flag for Belgium. The results of the search for the lost skull of Msiri which were presented to the Kingdom of Katanga and to The Royal Geographical Society of Scotland, opened more questions than answers. Fisher continues to support the kingdom in establishing the Bunkeya Cultural Village to celebrate the rich history and cultural heritage of the Garanganze people of Katanga, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Fisher's most recent projects also include establishing a new hiking trail in the Karamoja region of northern Uganda as well as a new expedition retracing Henry Morton Stanley's last expeditionary route along the Aruwimi River through the Ituri Forest of the Congo.

Julian Monroe Fisher is a Fellow of The Explorers Club and a Fellow with The Royal Geographical Society and a member of the American Anthropological Association.

julianmonroefisher.com

Date: June 2nd, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Dinner, 8:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $70

Guest Ticket Price: $80

Reservation Notes:

Reservations must be procured in advance for a catered dinner, and payment must accompany reservation. There will be no cancellations allowed after Friday, May 27th, 2016. Non-members are welcome to reserve a seat as the nominal guest of Daryl Hawk MR ’98, organizer of the Presidential Dinner.

To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Panthera Meeting_Trophy Room/Board Room_Daytime

Club Closed - Memorial Day

Explorers Club Headquarters will be closed today, Monday, May 30th, in honor of Memorial Day. We will resume regular operating hours on Tuesday, May 31st, at 9:00 am.

HOLD FOR CLARK ROOM FOR LUIS MUGA

HOLD FOR CLARK ROOM FOR LUIS MUGA (with Alexander Doba)

Date: 05-28-16

Hold - Orbital Outfitters Event

Mario Dellapina Cocktail Reception_Second Floor

Megan Hales

Richard Garriott Trophy Room Dinner

Public Lecture Series with Daryl Hawk

Sacred Places of the World

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

For the past 30 years, explorer and documentary photographer Daryl Hawk has traveled alone to some of the most remote places in the world telling stories with his camera. He spends weeks at a time documenting and immersing himself in different cultures and landscapes. He is a passionate defender of the world’s remaining wilderness areas and uses his photography to shine a light on why we need to protect them.

Mr. Hawk will be highlighting sacred landscapes with powerful nature, environmental portraits of indigenous cultures, ancient monastaries, etc. from faraway places such as the Arctic, Antarctica, the Andes, Patagonia, Bolivia, Ladakh, India, New Zealand, Bhutan and much more. Mountains, deserts, lakes, rivers, rain forests, forests, tundra have always been locations with intense beauty for him to photograph. These are sites of ceremony , spiritual inspiration and learning and always a primary goal to seek out on his long journeys.

However, sacred lands are more than esoteric, spiritual sanctuaries – these places protect biodiversity. The indigenous cultures that inhabit these lands represent a universitality of values that honor the sacred dimension of land and water. They practice reciprocity, reverence, respect and relationship on a daily basis viewing themselves as part of the earth, not superior to it.

Mr. Hawk will discuss his role as a documentary photographer and the need to continue to create awareness of key environmental and conservation issues. He will discuss his style, techniques, approach to subject matter, and how he plans and researches expeditions. “I like looking for wild country to be young in where my mind can run free and fast with the constant visual stimulation I experience from dawn to dusk – always seeking and searching for something new and different.”

His articles and stories often appear in magazines and newspapers worldwide. He has been featured several times on NBC’s Today Show and Fox 5 television. He has been a member of the Explorers Club for 20 years, a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and member of the Professional Photographers Association

He is the former host and producer of the cablevision television show “The Unconventional Traveler” which featured some of the world’s leading explorers, travel photographers and filmmakers sharing their work from various expeditions and documentaries. He produces over 100 shows over a ten year period. Some of his guests included Buzz Aldrin, Jane Goodall, George Schaller, and George Butler.

Additonally, he has published four books. The first, “Distant Journeys” consists of 200 color images from around the world. His other books include “Quiet Moments”, “White Pond” and “Manhattan.” For more information on Daryl Hawk, please visit his website at darylhawk.com.

Date: May 23, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - SCI / Frank Zitz event

T. Janulis Hold - Potential Club Event

Tentative Hold, see Britt.
Jenna said she was cancelling the Becky Yang cocktail reception and we could hold the space.

Chapter Event - Southwest

Dr. Jut Wynne - The Race to Save the Endemic Insects of Easter Island

About 800 years ago, Rapa Nui (Easter Island) underwent a massive ecological shift. The island was converted from a lush subtropical palm dominated woodland to a grassland. Timed with the arrival of the ancient Polynesians, a fragile environment and human pressures resulted island-wide extinctions of most plant and animal species. Dr. Jut Wynne has studied the relict fauna of Rapa Nui since 2008. He and colleagues discovered several endemic invertebrates - all new to science and now restricted to Rapa Nui caves. Join him as he discusses how these animals were able to eke out a living under-ground, the e¬fforts underway to protect the most vulnerable cave animals, and an over-view on his upcoming three-month expedition to study some of the most imperiled insect species on the planet.

Date: Thursday, May 19th

Time: 6:30 pm

Location: The Green Room, 15 N. Agassiz St., Flagstaff, AZ 86001

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: Free

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are not required for this event.

For more information, contact Joel Dugdale:

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
928.486.2984

Hold - 10 am - Steve Burnett tour with kids

Hold - Adam Gordon - 2nd Floor - Evening

Hold - Elena Clark Foundation Event

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Max Graham - CANCELLED

Space for Giants

The Challenges and Rewards of Managing a Conservation Organization in Africa

Dr. Max Graham is a British wildlife conservationist who founded Space for Giants in 2011 and is now its CEO. The Kenyan-based charity works tirelessly to provide a secure future for elephants, the places they live and the species that share their range. His talk will explore the development and work of Space for Giants, and the challenges and opportunities of conservation efforts in Africa.

Intertwined with his personal story will be a description of how he and the Space for Giants team created new refuges for wildlife and supports frontline protection for Africa’s most vulnerable populations of elephants– 100 are killed every single day for their ivory, fueling war and terrorism in Africa. If this is allowed to continue, elephants will become extinct from most of their range within the next 10 years. Dr. Graham has some fascinating stories about the African nations and presidential palaces he has visited along with Space for Giant’s Patron Evgeny Lebedev; deploying GPS collars on elephants; watching stock piles of ivory being destroyed in Ethiopia; and finding the carcass of one of his best known elephants who had been killed by poachers.

In addition, Dr. Graham will discuss the Giants Club, described as one of the most important elephant protection initiatives of our time. This exclusive membership forum brings together African political leaders, executives of natural resource extraction companies operating in Africa and key global influencers to secure Africa’s remaining elephant populations and the landscapes they depend on.



Max is a fluent Kiswahili speaker who has worked on environment and development projects in Afghanistan, Ecuador, Kenya, Zimbabwe and Gabon. He has been involved in elephant research and conservation since 2000 and in 2006 was awarded a PhD from the University of Cambridge for his research on human-elephant conflict. He has published numerous scientific papers on elephant behaviour, human-elephant conflict and wildlife conservation and in 2012 became a member of the IUCN African Elephant Specialist Group. He has been based in north Kenya for more than a decade.

Date: Monday, May 16th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Deidre Brennan

Seminar Series - Chris Nicola


Chris Nicola, FR ’04


On May 10, 2016, noted speleologist Chris Nicola, FR ’04 will discuss needed knowledge in cave exploration based on over 40 years of caving and leading more than 40 international expeditions. Chris will discuss cave exploration in terms of environment, principals, practices, techniques and equipment. As Chris points out, environments can range from narrow cold, wet crawlways with low air space requiring submersion in water for extended periods of time, to large dry cavernous rooms requiring either climbing high bare walls, or the rappelling in deep pits on the order of several hundred feet. Caves can contain rare fragile artifacts, snakes looking for cooler temperatures, one-of-a-kind cave-adapted organisms, toxic air pockets, or thousands of bats. Floors and walls can be solid, or teetering on collapse with just the slightest of wrong moves. But all caves are dark and remote. You might be just 40 feet below an ambulance but as much as 360 miles to the entrance giving access to that same ambulance. High humidity, airborne particulates of guano, and fatigue can lead to hypothermia, histoplasmosis, and injuries, some life threatening in nature. This ‘hands-on’ session will acquaint Members with the gear associated with ascending/descending, maneuvering, scientific collection, mapping techniques and ways to survive extended periods underground, while ensuring not only their own safety, but that of the cave itself and its contents.


Photo by Steven Duncan, Copyright Chris Nicola 2005


Exploration Seminars Program

As in the past, the Club’s more experienced and accomplished Members will address practical field needs and disciplines directly relevant to exploration. The common goal of the series is to contribute and expand field knowledge in a ‘show me how to’ format, with several sessions providing a ‘hands on’ approach.

Please note the Exploration Seminars are for Members only, without charge, but reservations are required due to limited seating in the Board Room. Members wishing to attend should call the Club Receptionist at (212) 628-8383, xt. 10, to secure space.

For further information regarding the seminars, or to suggest future topics and speakers, please contact Daniel A. Kobal, Ph.D. FE’89 directly at (718) 757-7996 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Alberto Villoldo

Storming Heaven

The Healers and Sages of the Andes

At 18,000 feet in the Andes every step is a meditation. You feel as if in a dream, and wake up to find yourself in another dream. One moment you are in a blinding blizzard, a white-out, and the next the sun is cornea-searing bright.

Dr. Alberto Villoldo had come to study the sages of the Andes, the last of the wisdom keepers that many believed had vanished at the time of the Spanish Conquest of Peru. They had only been “re-discovered” recently by his colleague, Dr. Chavez Ballon, then chief archeologist at Machu Picchu. He was joining these sages on their annual pilgrimage to Mt. Ausagate. Right before the final ascent to the glacier, they removed their ponchos and tied-on strings of Spanish moss, as they danced ecstatically masquerading as the mythical ‘pre-worldly beings’ that once roamed their land. Some would die as they gyrated at the summit of the nearly 21,000 foot-high glacier.

In this richly illustrated presentation Alberto will share the cosmology of the Andean peoples, the concept of ‘ayni’ or right relationship, and the magical world view of the shamans who live pre-Columbian in villages above the clouds in central Peru. He has spent more than 25 years studying the Andean paq’os.

The Andean sages believe that they can dream with their eyes open, and conjure the world into being newly each day. Alberto will share his images and experiences traveling with sages who were masters of the art of divination and of reading the signs of destiny.

Alberto Villoldo Ph.D. FN ’15 is a psychologist and medical anthropologist who has studied the medicine traditions of the Andes and the Amazon for over thirty years. He began his research among the jungle peoples in the Amazon basin, studying the effects of the ayahuasca, the mythical potion employed by jungle shamans to experience the realm beyond death.

While on the faculty at San Francisco State University, Dr. Villoldo founded and directed the Bio-Self Regulation Laboratory, where he investigated the effects of Shamanic practices on blood and brain chemistry. He is the founder of the Four Winds Society, dedicated to bridging ancient Shamanic healing practices with modern medicine and psychology. He is an adjunct faculty at Columbia University Teachers College.

Alberto Villoldo PhD is author of numerous bestselling books, including The Four Winds, A Shaman's Odyssey into the Amazon; Island of the Sun, the Teachings of the Medicine Wheel; Shaman, Healer, Sage; One Spirit Medicine; and Shamans Miraculous Tools for Healing.

His books have been featured in the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and main selections of Doubleday’s Book Clubs.

Date: Monday, May 9th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Chapter Event - Florida

We’re set for a fantastic adventure in Grand Cayman hosted by its US General Consulate Gary Montemayor FI’10! With a full day of adventure and presentations followed by classic Grand Cayman style fine dining, you’re sure to get the most out of your time on the Island.

Dr. Karen Rosenthal DVM, lecturer and Dean of SMU Veterinary School will discuss conservation efforts being done for endangered species native to the Cayman Islands, amongst other subjects. Gary Montemayor FI ’10, submersible pilot and veteran of over 2000 submersible dives, will do a media presentation on the deep Cayman Wall (escarpment) to 2000’.

This lecture will be followed by an investigative journey to explore the wild stingrays led by expert naturalist Jim Goetz. Bathing suits and courage required! A dinner will be held at the Grand Old House, a plantation home on the Ocean.

Saturday, May 7th, 2016

9:00AM – Depart from Cayman Islands Yacht Club for an investigative journey to explore the wild stingrays led by expert naturalist Jim Goetz. Bathing suits and courage required!

4:00PM – Presentations at SMU Medical School: Dr. Karen Rosenthal DVM, lecturer and Dean of SMU Veterinary School will discuss conservation efforts being done for endangered species native to the Cayman Islands, among other subjects. Gary Montemayor FI’10, submersible pilot and veteran of over 2000 submersible dives, will do a media presentation on the deep Cayman Wall (escarpment) to 2000’.

7:00PM – Oceanfront dining at the Grand Old House, a plantation home on the Ocean.

Expenses: Stingray experience $50, Dinner is self-tab.

Lodging: Grand Cayman offers a variety of lodging at varying rates. Please contact Gary Montemayor (below) for details.

Date: Saturday May 7, 2016

Reservation Notes:

For questions and to RSVP please contact:

Gary Montemayor FI’10
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Addresses:
Cayman Islands Yacht Club, 164 Yacht Drive
St. Matthew’s University, Lime Tree Bay Ave, West Bay, Grand Cayman
The Grand Old House, 648 S Church St, George Town, Cayman Islands

Young Explorers Program

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM in Clark Room
Martin Kraus & Richard Garriott

InterDigital Innovator’s Dinner

Painted Dog Conservation: Peter Blinston at The Explorers Club

Peter Blinston fell in love with African wild dogs while watching documentaries in his native England. He has now been with Painted Dog Conservation in Zimbabwe for eighteen years and serves as Executive Director. Peter has translated the initial vision for PDC into effective programs that are making a real difference to the long-term survival of African wild dogs.

Today there is overwhelming evidence that habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation pose some of the greatest threats to African wild dog survival. Because African wild dogs live at low densities and range so widely, they require much larger areas for their survival than most other carnivore species. In order to conserve viable populations of African wild dogs, large areas of land are required to encourage dispersal and therewith gene flow between populations. Maintaining connectivity between African wild dog habitats is vital for the conservation of remaining African wild dog populations.



This lecture will illustrate that the endangered African wild dog is an ecological flagship species, and that an estimated population of 500,000 has been reduced to fewer than 10,000 since the turn of the twentieth century. Zimbabwe is home to a critical population that is holding its own thanks to the committed efforts of Painted Dog Conservation.

Peter’s lecture will further illustrate that PDC is a living breathing example of Conservation through Action and Education. This is an organization that has taken community based conservation to a new height through an impressive and effective Education & Development Program that targets the local communities bordering Hwange National Park. They are driven by a belief that conservation needs to deliver tangible benefits to local communities that share their daily lives with the wildlife. Peter will illustrate that such benefits can lead to the desired environment where the African wild dog and all wildlife can thrive.

Date: Thursday, May 5th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are secured on a first-come, first-serve basis, and are required for this event.

Click here to purchase tickets on eventbrite

Alternatively, you may reserve by calling us at 212.628.8383 or emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - P. Brian Shay - 9:15-12:15 meeting - any room 4 people

Hold - Any Room - Jim Sano Meeting w/ 4 people - 2pm

Hold - Any Room - Jim Sano Meeting w/ 4 people - 2pm

Don Hartsell - Roosevelt Room meeting - 4:30PM

Don Hartsell - Roosevelt Room reservation for 5 people. 4:30PM on Monday, May 2nd. Per phone call to Andrew.

Public Lecture Series with Steve Nagiewicz

Hidden History: Maritime New Jersey

What stories hide beneath the sand and surf of the Jersey Shore?

An estimated three thousand shipwrecks lie off the coast of New Jersey, but these icy waters hold more mysteries than sunken hulls. Ancient arrowheads found on shoreline of Sandy Hook reveal Native American settlements before the land was flooded by melting glaciers over 10,000 years ago. Little-known sea battles raged along the South Jersey shore on the way to independence during the Revolutionary War, and forgotten ships lost in time are re-discovered national landmarks.

Captain Stephen D. Nagiewicz will uncover curious tales of storms, heroism and oddities off the New Jersey coast. In 1854, two hundred and forty immigrants of the New Era clipper ship met their fate off Deal Beach. Nobody knows what happened to two hydrogen bombs the United States Air Force lost off the Atlantic City Coast in 1957. Lessons from these tragic wrecks and dangerous missteps urged the development of safer ships, safety regulations and the US Coast Guard.

Capt. Nagiewicz is a commercial diver and dive vessel operator. He is an acknowledged authority on shipwrecks and scuba diving. He is a fellow and Former Executive Director of The Explorers Club and former Chairman of the Philadelphia Chapter of The Explorers Club, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Shark Research Institute of Princeton, NJ, Director of the State of New Jersey’s James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory at Sandy Hook, NJ, and is Co-Expedition leader of the R.J. Walker Shipwreck Mapping Expedition off Atlantic City. He is a Licensed USCG Master and professional diver with over 4000 scuba dives. He currently teaches Environmental and Marine Science at Atlantic City high school and Stockton University.

Date: Monday, May 2nd

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8383.

Charles and Ari Wedding

Chapter Event - Atlanta

We are proud to have Time Magazine's Hero for the Planet and EC Lowell Thomas awardee Dr. Laurie Marker of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, presented by the Explorers Club Atlanta Chapter and hosted by Zoo Atlanta, as our speaker on April 30th.

This evening at the Zoo will begin with dinner at 6 pm, cocktails and live animal encounters at 7 pm, and a presentation by Dr. Marker at 7:30 pm. The cost of this terrific evening is $34.

IMPORTANT:
Please go to the link below to get details for this event and REGISTER:

https://give.zooatlanta.org/ExploreCheetah

We are so very excited to be teamed now with Zoo Atlanta and we hope this will be the beginning of many great collaborations together. Hope to see you there!

Mitchell Terk Dinner

Presidential Dinner with Prof. Lee R. Berger

The Explorers Club cordially invites you to an evening with world-renowned paleoanthropologist, physical anthropologist and archaeologist Professor Lee R. Berger.

Prof. Berger, Ph.D. D.Sc. FRSSAf ASSAf is an award-winning researcher, explorer, author and speaker. He is the recipient of the National Geographic Society’s first Prize for Research and Exploration and the Academy of Achievement’s Golden Plate Award. His work has brought him recognition as a Fellow of the Royal Society of South Africa and the South African Academy of Sciences and prominent advisory positions including the Chairmanship of the Fulbright Commission of South Africa, the Senior Advisory Board of the Global Young Academy and the Centre of Excellence in PalaeoSciences of South Africa among many others. He is a South African Ambassador for Tourism, Conventions and Business Events. He has been awarded several humanitarian awards including the Boy Scout Medal of Honor for saving a life and the Red Cross Certificate of Merit. In addition his efforts in conservation have been recognized by the William T. Hornaday Award and Georgia’s Youth Conservationist of the Year.

His explorations into human origins on the African continent, Asia and Micronesia for the past two and a half decades have resulted in many new discoveries, including the discovery of two new species of early human relatives – Australopithecus sediba and Homo naledi. His contributions to exploration sciences have also resulted in advances in the field of applied exploration methods and the application of technology to exploration, excavation and discovery.

He is the author of more than two hundred scholarly and popular works including more than 100 refereed papers and a number of academic and popular books on palaeontology, natural history, and exploration. His work has been featured three times on the cover of Science, and has been named the top 100 science stories of the year by Time, Scientific American and Discover Magazine on numerous occasions. He has appeared in many television documentaries on subjects related to archaeology, palaeoanthropology and natural history. Berger is an international recognized proponent of open access science and open sourcing.

He has founded the not for profit Lee R. Berger Foundation for Exploration and was a founder of the Palaeoanthropological Scientific Trust and a founding Trustee of the Jane Goodall Society of South Africa. He is Director of both the Malapa site and Rising Star excavations the latter resulting in the discovery of the largest primitive hominin assemblage in history.

He is an avid diver and adventurer and holds a PADI Divemaster certificate among many other specialties.

Berger was born in Shawnee Mission Kansas and grew up in rural Georgia. He was a member of Troop 341 of the Coastal Empire Council. He was awarded his Eagle Scout in 1983 achieving his silver and gold palms and has been recognized as a Distinguished Eagle Scout by the Eagle Scout Association of America.

Berger is presently the Research Professor in Human Evolution and the Public Understanding of Science at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa and an Explorer in Residence at the National Geographic Society. He is also the Division Director of Palaeoanthropology in the Evolutionary Studies Institute at the University of the Witwatersrand. He holds a Ph.D. in palaeoanthropology and a Doctor of Science in the same field.

Date: April 27, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Dinner, 8:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $70

Guest Ticket Price: $80

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online at eventbrite.com

Reservations must be procured in advance for a catered dinner, and payment must accompany reservation. There will be no cancellations allowed after Friday, April 22nd, 2016.

To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383, or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Seminar Series - Ernst W. Aebi


Ernst W. Aebi, FR ’88

Système “D” — How to Get Out of Trouble in the Field

Ernst W. Aebi, FR ’88 will present a ‘survival session’ on how to overcome various unusual obstacles, entitled ‘Système “D” – How to Get Out of Trouble in the Field’. While traveling in 153 countries, some by local means, some in his car or truck, on cross country skis (from eastern Siberia to the North Pole), doing four trans-Atlantic sailboat crossings (one single handed), on river boats, floating through rapids on inner tubes, riding horses, ponies, camels, walking – with or without shoes (once after his shoes were stolen in a rebel attack in the Sahara) – going over mountains, through jungles, trackless deserts, Ernst often had to resort to Système "D", from the French, which stands for Système démerde, and translates as "Pull yourself out of s***". This session promises to instruct and imbue Members in survival skills when facing challenging situations and odd predicaments.


Exploration Seminars Program

As in the past, the Club’s more experienced and accomplished Members will address practical field needs and disciplines directly relevant to exploration. The common goal of the series is to contribute and expand field knowledge in a ‘show me how to’ format, with several sessions providing a ‘hands on’ approach.

Please note the Exploration Seminars are for Members only, without charge, but reservations are required due to limited seating in the Board Room. Members wishing to attend should call the Club Receptionist at (212) 628-8383, xt. 10, to secure space.

For further information regarding the seminars, or to suggest future topics and speakers, please contact Daniel A. Kobal, Ph.D. FE’89 directly at (718) 757-7996 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Date: Tuesday, April 26th

Time: 6:30 pm

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Public Lecture Series with Harriet Tuckey

Everest, The First Ascent

The untold story of Griffith Pugh, the man who made it possible

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

Traditionally British Everest climbers always insisted that they abhorred competition. However, they were well aware that between the first and second World Wars the Alpine Club, the Royal Geographical Society and the British India Office shamelessly denied climbers from all other countries access to Everest – including USA climbers. Protected by their monopoly, the British sent seven major expeditions to Everest between the Wars which all failed, but they made no concerted effort to find out why they were failing. They were in the grip of the British public school amateur sporting tradition which abhorred the mixing of science and mountaineering and believed that success would ultimately come from the traditional British gentlemanly heroic qualities of indomitable courage, teamwork, climbing talent, and persistence in adversity

But then after World War II everything changed when for the first time Nepal opened the doors to competition from other countries and the British suddenly faced being beaten to the top and humiliated. Their ‘sporting’ facade abruptly crumbled and they promptly called in a physiologist to study the problems and make recommendations for the 1953 expedition which they saw as their last opportunity to get to the top first. The physiologist was Griffith Pugh.

On Cho Oyu in the spring of 1952, on a training expedition led by Eric Shipton, Pugh conducted groundbreaking research into the use of oxygen for climbing and studied acclimatization, hydration, nutrition and protective clothing and equipment. On his return he devised a blueprint for success in 1953 – covering acclimatization, diet, hygiene and crucially the policies for the use of oxygen and consumption of fluids. In addition he designed or modified most of the clothing and protective equipment used on the expedition – such as the tents, the high-altitude boots, the climbing suits, sleeping bags and the Primus stoves.

The result was magnificent success. Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay came down from the summit in far better condition than any previous Everest summit pair.



Pugh’s work had a dramatic and immediate impact on Himalayan climbing. Within three years of Everest, using his techniques, the world’s six highest mountains were all successfully climbed. Previously they had defeated the best efforts of the world’s finest mountaineers for decade after decade. Within five years of Everest all but two of the 14 mountains above 8,000 meters were climbed in relative safety. Of the two remaining one was inaccessible. And yet Pugh never received public credit for his achievements. This talk will attempt to set the record straight, lavishly illustrated with Pugh’s own slides from the 1953 expedition.

Harriet Tuckey is the daughter of Griffith Pugh. Despite having had a poor relationship with her father, she felt compelled to begin researching his life after finding out quite by chance at the Royal Geographical Society in London in 1993 during the fortieth anniversary of the first ascent, about the crucial contribution he made to Everest. When, ten years later, his name was not mentioned in the fiftieth anniversary celebrations, she realized he was being completely forgotten and began working on his biography.

In the course of researching her book she carried out in-depth interviews with all eight surviving members of the Everest team – including Sir Edmund Hillary – and nearly 80 other former colleagues and friends of Pugh, travelling all over the world to meet them. She has also studied in fifteen archives enabling her to present a completely new and different story about the British Everest triumph – one that has never been told before. Her book has won four prizes, including the Boardman Tasker Prize for the best Mountaineering book, the Banff Award for Mountain Literature and the British Sports Book Award for outstanding general sports writing.

Tuckey has a first class degree in Literature and an MA in the Sociology of Literature from the University of Essex as well as a postgraduate diploma in the History of Art from the Courtauld Institute. She has worked for the policy think tank PEP, the UK Department of Employment and the Manpower Services Commission in various research capacities.

Date: Monday, April 25th

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Janulis Event - 10 AM - 2 PM

Date: Sunday, April 24

Empowers Africa

Hold - Guillermo Sohnlein Board Meeting - Roosevelt Office - 3 to 5 pm

Hold - Alexander Ponomarev Biennale Press Conference

Public Lecture Series with Sebastian Copeland

Arctica: The Vanishing North

As an award winning photographer, extreme athlete, filmmaker, author, lecturer and environmental activist, Sebastian Copeland’s work has been featured on CNN’s Larry King, ABC, ESPN, NPR, and Current TV and in National Geographic, Vanity Fair, USA Today, Sierra Club, House & Garden, Publisher’s Weekly, W Magazine, Elle, People Magazine.

His fine quality prints have appeared at the United Nations (Solo Show, 2007), the Council on Foreign Relations, Peabody Essex Museum and the Field Museum (Chicago) among others. These works can also be found in private collections in both the United States and Europe and several are now part of the permanent archive of The Natural World Museum in San Francisco.

A Summa Cum Laude graduate of UCLA Film School (’87) and the son of highly successful family of artists (his father is classical conductor Jean-Claude Casadesus, Director of the Lille National Philharmonic Orchestra), Sebastian—a British/French national relocated to NY in 1980—began his career directing music videos followed by commercials. His still work has appeared in hundreds of publications worldwide including GQ, Marie Claire, The Face, Cosmopolitan, Vanity Fair, Elle Magazine, Interview magazine, and National Geographic. The winner of the prestigious International Photography Awards’ 2007 Professional Photographer of the Year for his first book, Sebastian’s prints from “Antarctica: The Global Warning” were also selected to tour as part of the 2006 and 2007 IPA ‘Best of Show’ collection. In 2008, Sebastian released a second book titled Antarctica: A Call To Action.

His early photography ranged from fashion and advertising to album covers and celebrities. Subjects included Elijah Wood, Kate Bosworth, Salma Hayek, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Phil Collins, Sandra Bullock, and Orlando Bloom. Amongst his various film studio clients are Disney, Universal, Paramount or Warner Bros. Sebastian has shot movie posters for Goal!, The Fast and The Furious: Tokyo Drift, and Herbie—Fully Loaded, and the international press for such films as Pirates of the Caribbean’s, Troy and Seabiscuit. His TV commercials clients include Fila, Old Spice, Pantene, Disney, Nintendo and Mennen amongst others.

A personal commitment to fight for the protection of the environment has led to a seat on the Board of Directors of Global Green (the US arm of President Gorbachev’s Green Cross International) and a relentless pursuit of a sustainable future.

Sebastian uses photography as a medium for activism. “Helping people fall in love with their world,” he says,”is a catalyst to wanting to save it." An extreme adventure expert, Sebastian has led various expeditions to the polar regions. Sebastian spent six weeks in 2006 and in 2007 aboard a scientific research icebreaker in the Antarctic Peninsula. In 2008 Sebastian and partner Luc Hardy led a team of nine children from international nationalities for a month in the northernmost Canadian Arctic as the Young Ambassadors of the Arctic. In March 2009, Sebastian led a mission to the geographical North Pole. He and partner Keith Heger walked seven hundred kilometers to commemorate the centennial of Admiral Peary’s reach in 1909. Sebastian filmed the mission and assembled it into the documentary Into The Cold: A Journey Of The Soul. The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and went on to win multiple awards. In May 2010, Sebastian and partner Eric McNair-Landry left from southern Greenland to cross the 2300 kilometers of its ice sheet using skis and kites. They reached the northern tip 41 days later. They hold a new world record for longest distance traveled on kites and skis over one twenty hour period by covering 595 kilometers.

On the centennial 2011-2012 season of the South Pole, again with partner Eric McNair-Landry, Sebastian led a 4100 kilometers transcontinental crossing of Antarctica by skis and kites, setting three world records over the 82 days expedition.

As an international speaker on climate crisis for over a decade, Sebastian has been featured on television and radio (Larry King Live, NPR, Air America) and has given keynote addresses to audiences at the United Nations, the World Affairs Council, the General Assembly on Climate in New Orleans, the DLD in Munich Germany, the George Eastman House, Google Headquarters and to Apple’s Senior Design Team amongst others.

In 2008, Sebastian was named German GQ’s Man of the Year for environmental leadership. In 2009, he received the Founder’s Award from Global Green USA, and in 2010 the Gala Award.

Date: Monday, April 18th

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

"Our World Underwater" Rolex - Clark Room

Lion Conservation: Tracking Cecil, Herding Cats, and the Art of the Vuvuzela

This event is a unique opportunity to hear from the researcher who tracked and collared Cecil the lion, and broke the news about the famous lion's untimely death.

Brent Stapelkamp is a 38-year-old Zimbabwean born lion conservationist who has spent the last decade working on the Hwange Lion research project in Zimbabwe. Brent and his ten person “Long Shields” team track, dart, collar, and observe these lions in an effort to keep the prides inside the park, away from the local tribal cattle, and safe from hunters’ guns.

Brent is fully aware of the potential that hunting can play in the conservation of Africa's wildlife. However, after nine years as a full-time lion researcher in Hwange National Park, Brent has witnessed first-hand the detrimental effects of hunting on lions. He believes that this species is far too rare and sensitive to hunting for that to continue. There is now a grand challenge that falls on our shoulders collectively if we are to save Africa’s wildlife and Brent is ready and willing to play his part in that.



Join us for this special Thursday Night Lecture, and listen to Brent's exciting tales about working on the front-lines of conservation. He will also outline his work, including the methods and equipment used to track lions in Hwange, as well as his plans to utilize the awareness that Cecil brought to the world for the conservation of Africa’s ecosystems. Afterward, join Brent in a discourse about where we can take lion conservation from here.

To learn more, please visit the WildCRU website.

Date: April 14, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Click here to purchase tickets on Eventbrite

Alternatively, you may reserve by calling us at 212.628.8383 or emailing .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - WINGS Board Meeting - Roosevelt Office - 6-8:30

Hold - Dr. George Lombardi Event

Hold - Dr. George Lombardi Event, Kevin is writing this, email is from his assistant Brittany Carey

Film Screening - Inuit Lands: The Melting Point

A Film by Patrick Morell
Golden Rabbit Films LLC

Traveling across Greenland from 2011 through 2013, Documentary filmmaker Patrick Morell creates a tribute to Jean Malaurie’s lifetime study of the Arctic people. Malaurie is an internationally renowned French explorer, geomorphologist and ethno historian.

After spending 1950–51 with an isolated group of Eskimos in northern Greenland, sharing their life at the very edge of survival, Malaurie and his companions returned to Thule village to confront a U.S. Air Force base under construction, and suddenly “Men who lived by the harpoon found themselves in the atomic age.”

When Maluarie returned to the Arctic in 1972, the base had irreversibly transformed the Eskimo (Inuit) culture. Addressing these topics and his own experiences, his book The Last Kings of Thule (1955) earned international acclaim.

The film continues in Jean Malaurie’s footsteps and exposes the changes affecting the small hunting and fishing communities of northern Greenland today, including globalization, market economies, and climate change.

Patrick Morell is a Freelance Documentary Cinematographer and Director. His work is dedicated to making films that evoke a deeper understanding of the human experience with all its complexities across diverse topics. Subjects covered include wars, natural and man-made disasters, and regions of environmental concern.

Festivals where his films have been selected for market and screening include Marche du Film-Festival de Cannes, Festival de films de la Grande Europe (Paris) and the Margaret Mead Film Festival, NY, NY. His most recent work, as an independent filmmaker and freelance cameraman, features a wide array of International documentaries for European television (Arte France, TV 5 France, Studio 21 Sarajevo) and for US broadcasting (PBS, Discovery Channel, and HBO).

Raised in France and graduated from the Sorbonne with degrees in philosophy and journalism, Patrick’s work has led him to travel extensively in the USA, Europe (France, UK, Russia, Turkey and Eastern Europe), the Arctic Circle (Alaska / Greenland) South East Asia and Asia (India / Nagaland / Nepal/ China), the Middle East (Jordan / Lebanon / Syria) and Africa (Egypt /Sudan).

goldenrabbitfilms.net


Date: April 12th, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Screening

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Inuit Lands - Film Screening

'INUIT LANDS The Melting Point' is a tribute to Jean Malaurie lifetime study of the Arctic people. After sharing, during a year, the life of an isolated group of Eskimos in northern Greenland, Jean Malaurie and his companions returned to Thule village where a U.S. Air Force base was under construction. The film follows Jean Malaurie footsteps and exposes the changes affecting the small hunting and fishing communities of northern Greenland today, including globalization, market economies, and climate change.

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Sheri Speede

Cameroon’s Chimpanzee Champion: Dr. Sheri Speede

As chronicled in the award-winning memoir Kindred Beings, published by Harper Collins in 2013, American veterinarian Sheri Speede traveled to Cameroon for the first time in 1997 to provide veterinary care to primates at an urban zoo. While in Cameroon she happened to befriend three caged adult chimpanzees being held for decades as tourist attractions at an Atlantic coast resort hotel. These sad chimpanzees, orphaned and taken from the forest as infants, had endured unfathomable deprivation and cruelty at the hands of humans, and yet Dr. Speede recognized a lingering hope, an insistent resilience, in their eyes that spoke to her profoundly. By late 1998, she had sold her interest in her veterinary practice, left her comfortable life in the suburbs of Portland, Oregon and moved to Cameroon to establish a chimpanzee sanctuary so she could take these chimpanzees back to the forest where she knew they belonged. Overcoming many seemingly insurmountable obstacles, operating on a shoestring budget, negotiating and collaborating with the Cameroon government and the village community, she founded Sanaga-Yong Chimpanzee Rescue Center in Cameroon’s remote Mbargue Forest and brought the first rescued chimpanzees there in 1999. The Center became a founding member of the Pan African Sanctuary Alliance (PASA) in 2001.

Dr. Speede learned first hand about the threats facing chimpanzees and other endangered species in Central Africa, including the thriving illegal bushmeat trade, which as a by-product was producing the orphans she and her team were rescuing. Infant chimpanzees who survived the bloody hunts could be worth more alive than dead when sold within the country as pets or smuggled out to meet the growing demand for wildlife in Asia. As the years went by Dr. Speede and her team collaborated with Cameroon authorities to rescue many chimpanzees – some of whom had endured strict confinement and malnutrition for decades before their rescue and others who were confiscated and brought to Sanaga-Yong Center as babies. As she witnessed the tragedy firsthand, the fight to save the species from extinction became intensely personal.

Today the Center provides a permanent home to 72 chimpanzee orphans while it spearheads and supports wildlife law enforcement, habitat protection and conservation education. The Center plays a vital role in combating the illegal chimpanzee trade; without a sanctuary for illegally trafficked orphans, there could be no confiscations and no arrests or prosecutions of dealers. Other conservation programs and activities carried out by the Center include sustainable agriculture/agro-forestry in villages surrounding the Mbargue Forest, wildlife surveys in support of forest protection, intense lobbying for forest protection in the communities and at multiple levels of government, and facilitation of meetings between key people in government and community stakeholders. The Center’s relationship with the local community is intrinsically linked to the conservation initiatives, and it has engaged with and benefited the community in a variety of ways – employing local residents, creating a market economy for local farmers, building a school, providing emergency medical care and installing a small grain mill. The Center’s education outreach includes a new children’s book, Je Protégé les Chimpanzés (I Protect the Chimpanzees), narrated by a fictional Cameroonian boy, and a four-day classroom program targeting 5000 children per year.

Dr. Sheri Speede’s heartfelt journey, which is far from over, has been characterized at every turn by unique fortitude and determination. She speaks eloquently, passionately and with humor about the chimpanzees and her tireless work on their behalf.

Date: April 11th, 2016

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price:

$5 with a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Navin Sawhney PONTANT Press Conference Event - Morning on 2nd Fl

Young Explorers Program

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM in Clark Room
Martin Kraus & Richard Garriott

Hold - Jo Ann & Samuel Silverstein Event

Lindblad Expeditions_Second Floor and Trophy Room

The Explorers Club ®, World Center for Exploration ®, The Flag and the Seal are registered trademarks of The Explorers Club. Use by others is strictly prohibited. Photographs appearing on this website are used by permission and may not be copied or re-used in any manner.

Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste