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Joanne & Brad’s Wedding

Julie Russ Arizona State Second Floor

Hold - Wedding - Alessandra DeBenidetti

Sandra Effron Event

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Kristin Simpson Wedding

Hold - Board Meeting

Jeff Morgan_Second Floor

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Saturday Science for Students

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Saturday Science for Students

T-Hold - Martin Kraus Expedition Event - Plaisted 50 year north pole anniversary

Empowers Africa

T Hold - Sailing Stories

Hold - Ann Passer - Wildlife

Hold - Ann Passer - Wildlife

Hold - Jennifer Greim / Thomas Cole National Historic Site

ECAD 2018

Hold - Ann Passer - Wolves

The Last Wild Men of Borneo: A True Tale of Death and Treasure

Explorers Club Public Lecture Series with Carl Hoffman

To understand Michael Rockefeller’s disappearance in 1961 for his book Savage Harvest, Carl Hoffman went deeper than he’d ever gone before, making two journeys of several months, each to one of the remotest places on earth – the swamps of southwest New Guinea, home to the Asmat people. The experience culminated in his living with former headhunters in a two room wooden house without electricity or plumbing, in a village without a single store, and only reachable by boat.

For Hoffman, these trips evoked the story of Bruno Manser, a Swiss shepherd who’d traveled to meet the Penan, the indigenous nomads of the great forests of Borneo, in 1984. Bruno crossed a line and became known to even the Penan themselves as Lakei Penan—Penan Man. He spoke their language, hunted with a blowpipe, walked over the jungle thorns barefoot, and eventually led the Penan like a T.E. Lawrence of the rainforest, in a revolt against the powerful Malaysian logging industry.

What fascinated Hoffman about his story wasn’t just what he did, but how the developed world reacted to him, how he was venerated, lionized—how he fulfilled every Western trope about indigenous people. But so, too, had something gone terribly wrong, and he had vanished in the forest in 2000. There were rumors: Murdered? Driven mad? No one could say for sure.

Serendipitously, while pondering Bruno during a visit to Bali, Hoffman met an American named Michael Palmieri. He had lived on the island for more than 40 years and, though a little older than Bruno, was of the same generation. They’d both been called to serve in their national militaries and both had refused. They’d both left their cultures and ended up traveling deep into the rivers and rainforests Borneo. But Michael, seeking the exquisite and powerful carvings of the indigenous tribes, had gone in and come out, in and out, over 150 times since 1974, and the fruits of his labor were displayed in many of the world’s greatest museums—another tangible proof of us coveting their worlds.

Michael and Bruno were completely different kinds of men. Bruno was an idealist, a do-gooder, a refugee from the modern world who despised the cult of Western consumerism and devoted his life to the Penan. Michael was a buccaneer, a man who spent his life buying and selling the Dayak’s art, the physical manifestations of their sacred universe, pieces that fed our hungry souls and rose in price even as the cultures that produced them were dying, and in doing so had carved out a comfortable life for himself.

But hearing Michael’s story, it struck Hoffman that he and Bruno were two pieces of a whole, two men who spent their lives in pursuit of the sacred fire of “exotic” indigenous people. They’d both become obsessed with Borneo’s people, were fascinated with sacred cultures and our romantic notions of their power. The two were hungry to touch a perceived Eden of our past, desperate to hold it in their hands and in their hearts, both trying to fill some piece of their souls with it, from it, in very different ways.

And then Michael told Hoffman that he’d met Bruno – their paths had crossed one day in Borneo in 1999.

He decided then to follow the stories of Michael and Bruno, two narratives that were really one. It was the story of the fate of Borneo: the place itself and an idea that we coveted, the last Eden of our imagination, a wild garden filled with spirits and magic and unconquered people. He would find out what happened to Bruno Manser and how well either of these wild men of Borneo had succeeded in fulfilling their dreams. Dreams of being adventurers in a strange land. Dreams of escaping western culture and wrapping themselves in the powers of Borneo’s indigenous people. And the most difficult dream of all – of saving its inextricably linked wildness and culture.

Carl Hoffman is an Explorers Club Fellow and the author of the New York Times bestselling Savage Harvest: A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Rockefeller’s Tragic Quest, which was a New York Times editor’s choice and one of the Washington Post’s 50 notable books of 2014. The Lunatic Express: Discovering the World via Its Most Dangerous Buses, Boats, Trains, and Planes, was named one of the ten best books of 2010 by the Wall Street Journal. He is a former contributing editor to National Geographic Traveler and Wired magazines and has reported from some eighty countries, including the high Arctic, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, West Papua, Papua New Guinea, Mongolia, Mali, Egypt and both Russia and the former Soviet Union.

Date: Monday, March 5

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us a 212.628.8384.

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Saturday Science for Students

March Hare

See Stefan

Hold - Horowitz Concert

Hold - WILD Film Festival

Hold - WILD Film Festival

Hold - WILD Film Festival

Hold - WILD Film Festival

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Nycmer Event

Spence School_Second Floor

Himalaya Bound: One Family’s Quest to Save Their Animals & An Ancient Way of Life

Explorers Club Public Lecture Series with Michael Benanav

The Van Gujjars are nomadic water buffalo herders who live in the forests and mountains of northern India. Traditionally, they dwell in the wilderness, where their world revolves around the feeding and well-being of their animals. They spend the winter months in the lowland jungles of the Shivalik Hills, where thick foliage provides plenty of fodder for the buffaloes. Each April, however, temperatures there soar above 110 degrees; the leaves and grasses wither and die; creeks run dry. With nothing left for their animals to eat or drink, the Van Gujjars must move. Entire families, from infants to the elderly, trek with their herds up into the Himalayas, where melting snows reveal lush alpine meadows laced by gurgling streams. When the cold sets in at the end of September, they head back down to the Shivaliks, where the jungle has sprung back to life following the monsoon rains. The tribe has followed this cycle of seasonal migration - up in summer, down in winter, shunning settled village life - for over a thousand years.

Van Gujjars have deep personal relationships with their water buffaloes: they think of them as family members, like sons and daughters or brothers and sisters. They readily sacrifice their own comfort for that of their buffaloes. If a buffalo falls ill, Van Gujjars are wracked with concern; if one dies, they mourn for it as though it were human. They never eat their animals or sell them for slaughter, keeping them only for their milk – and though they are Muslim, they are also vegetarian, averse to the idea of killing living creatures.

But things are changing. While about 30,000 Van Gujjars still live in the wilderness today, the existential challenges they face may drive nearly all of them out of the forests over the next couple of generations. The main threat to their way of life has been the designation of their traditional lands as national parks - from which the government has attempted, often successfully, to evict the nomads and settle them in villages, turning them into wheat farmers.

In 2009, author and photojournalist Michael Benanav embedded himself with one Van Gujjar family to document their annual spring migration. He lived with them for 44 days, walking with them, herding buffaloes with them, sharing their food, sleeping under their tents, and becoming much more a part of the family than he ever expected. He came to know them well – their joys and their troubles, their hopes and fears for the future, and their perspectives on their place in the world.

Benanav’s new book, Himalaya Bound: One Family’s Quest to Save Their Animals and an Ancient Way of Life (January 2018, Pegasus) offers an intimate glimpse into the rarely-seen world of the Van Gujjars. For this event, he will take you along on a photographic journey of their migration into the Himalayas, featuring extraordinary images of nomadic life in the forests and mountains of north India. And he will delve into the dilemmas faced by the family he traveled with, as government authorities threatened to ban them from the alpine meadows where they have lived in summers for many generations.

Benanav is the author of three books, including Men Of Salt: Crossing the Sahara on the Caravan of White Gold, for which he traveled 1000 miles with one of the last working camel caravans on earth. His work, including articles and images from five continents, appears in The New York Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Geographical Magazine, Sierra Magazine, Lonely Planet, and more. His photos have been featured on 60 Minutes, in National Geographic Books’ Rarely Seen: Images of the Extraordinary, and at the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, in New Delhi. He is also the founder of Traditional Cultures Project, an educational non-profit that documents traditional and indigenous cultures around the world.

Date: Monday, February 5

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call 212.628.8383.

Saturday Science for Students

Public Lecture Series with Nathaniel J. Dominy

Mummified baboons reveal the geographic location of Punt

The origin of long-distance maritime commerce has roots in the Red Sea region. Graphic and epigraphic accounts of this trade often provide specific place names, or toponyms, with unambiguous geographic locations. Yet the location of one crucial state, Punt (or Pwnt), remains uncertain. Punt was a major emporium for gold, electrum, and biological materials such as myrrh, ebony, ivory, short-horned cattle, leopards, and hamadryas baboons (Papio hamadryas). The value of these resources is reflected a common epithet for Punt, "God's Land," and in the 1200-year duration of trade between Ancient Egypt and Punt (Vth-XXth Dynasties; ca. 2458-1163 BC). The recovery of mummified baboons from New Kingdom-era tombs, which is coincident the pinnacle of trade between Ancient Egypt and Punt, raises the possibility of using stable isotope analysis to source their provenience. This talk will describe how we measured the oxygen and strontium stable isotope composition of modern and mummified baboons from two periods, the XXth Dynasty and Ptolemaic, to test between five competing geographic hypotheses for the ancient location of Punt.

Nathaniel Dominy FN'10 is the Charles Hansen Professor of Anthropology at Dartmouth College. He studies the behavior, ecology, and functional morphology of humans and nonhuman primates, with a particular emphasis on living populations in East Africa and Southeast Asia. His philosophy toward research is to integrate tropical fieldwork with mechanical, molecular, and isotopic analyses in order to better understand how and why adaptive shifts occurred during primate evolution. He has received grants or fellowships from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, National Geographic Society, Packard Foundation, Mellon Foundation, and Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. As a result of this funding, he has published over 100 articles in journals or books since receiving his PhD in 2001. He is a Senior Fellow in the Dartmouth Society of Fellows and he is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Linnean Society, the Royal Geographic Society, and the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Professor Dominy has been honored by faculties at the University of Hong Kong (the Dr. K. P. Stephen Chang Gold Medal in 2001 and the Li Ka-Shing Prize in 2002) and Dartmouth College (the Karen E. Wetterhahn Award in 2012, the Friedman Family Fellowship in 2012, the John M. Manley Huntington Award in 2015, and the C. Troy Shaver 1969 Fellowship in 2015). Other distinctions are hyperbolic but generous, including profiles as a ‘Brilliant Ten’ scientist under the age of 40 (in 2009 by Popular Science magazine) and as one of '100 Most Influential People in the Upcoming Decade' (in 2011 by Channel Young, a Shanghai-based media group).

Date: Monday, January 29

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8384

6th Annual Polar Film Festival

25-27 January, 2018

The 6th Annual Explorers Club Polar Film Festival


The Explorers Club will host its Sixth Annual Polar Film Festival on 25-27 of January 2018, to screen a diverse collection of films about the Arctic and Antarctic.

The festival is open to the public and offers the audience the opportunity to rub elbows with the presenters, special guests, speakers and filmmakers who will share their stories and imagery as the event honors their passion and spotlights their life’s arctic and antarctic work.

The Explorers Club has always been closely associated with polar travel and exploration. During its early years, the Club’s prominent members, including Robert Peary, Frederick Cook and Roald Amundsen, to name a few, gradually lifted the veil that covered the ends of the Earth. Less well known, however, are the extensive photographic records, artifacts, and histories collected and maintained by the Club that capture this important period of polar exploration.

The time has come to start the search for next year's films, falling under the following categories:

• Conservation
• Adventure
• Environment
• Human interest
• Expeditions

We are accepting feature length to short films.

The due date for submissions is October 30th, 2017.

Please mail DVD entries to:
The Explorers Club
c/o Stefan Kindberg
46 East 70th Street,
New York, NY, 10021

For digital entries, upload to Vimeo. Enable "add to" feature and email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

You can also submit your films via FilmFreeway by clicking here.

PFF

Not sure on start time.

6th Annual Polar Film Festival

25-27 January, 2018

The 6th Annual Explorers Club Polar Film Festival


The Explorers Club will host its Sixth Annual Polar Film Festival on 25-27 of January 2018, to screen a diverse collection of films about the Arctic and Antarctic.

The festival is open to the public and offers the audience the opportunity to rub elbows with the presenters, special guests, speakers and filmmakers who will share their stories and imagery as the event honors their passion and spotlights their life’s arctic and antarctic work.

The Explorers Club has always been closely associated with polar travel and exploration. During its early years, the Club’s prominent members, including Robert Peary, Frederick Cook and Roald Amundsen, to name a few, gradually lifted the veil that covered the ends of the Earth. Less well known, however, are the extensive photographic records, artifacts, and histories collected and maintained by the Club that capture this important period of polar exploration.

The time has come to start the search for next year's films, falling under the following categories:

• Conservation
• Adventure
• Environment
• Human interest
• Expeditions

We are accepting feature length to short films.

The due date for submissions is October 30th, 2017.

Please mail DVD entries to:
The Explorers Club
c/o Stefan Kindberg
46 East 70th Street,
New York, NY, 10021

For digital entries, upload to Vimeo. Enable "add to" feature and email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

You can also submit your films via FilmFreeway by clicking here.

6th Annual Polar Film Festival

25-27 January, 2018

The 6th Annual Explorers Club Polar Film Festival


The Explorers Club will host its Sixth Annual Polar Film Festival on 25-27 of January 2018, to screen a diverse collection of films about the Arctic and Antarctic.

The festival is open to the public and offers the audience the opportunity to rub elbows with the presenters, special guests, speakers and filmmakers who will share their stories and imagery as the event honors their passion and spotlights their life’s arctic and antarctic work.

The Explorers Club has always been closely associated with polar travel and exploration. During its early years, the Club’s prominent members, including Robert Peary, Frederick Cook and Roald Amundsen, to name a few, gradually lifted the veil that covered the ends of the Earth. Less well known, however, are the extensive photographic records, artifacts, and histories collected and maintained by the Club that capture this important period of polar exploration.

The time has come to start the search for next year's films, falling under the following categories:

• Conservation
• Adventure
• Environment
• Human interest
• Expeditions

We are accepting feature length to short films.

The due date for submissions is October 30th, 2017.

Please mail DVD entries to:
The Explorers Club
c/o Stefan Kindberg
46 East 70th Street,
New York, NY, 10021

For digital entries, upload to Vimeo. Enable "add to" feature and email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

You can also submit your films via FilmFreeway by clicking here.

PFF - Tent. Hold

Possible additional programming

Hold - Horowitz Concert

Public Lecture Series with Priya Natarajan

Mapping the Heavens

How radical ideas have transformed our cosmic view

This lecture focuses on two radical scientific ideas in cosmology that involve invisible entities - dark matter and black holes. Using these as case-studies, Priya Natarajan will outline the history of the discovery of dark matter and black holes, focusing on the process of acceptance by the larger scientific community.

The path to acceptance of radical ideas in science is not linear and is punctuated by personal rivalries and ambitions. Ultimately, it is really data and evidence that enable new ideas to make the leap to acceptance. Natarajan will try to de-mystify this process, which is essential to scientific discoveries and is driven by the procuring of data and evidence enabled by the invention of new instruments and technologies. She will outline the current status of these two ideas, including recent breakthroughs in our understanding from mapping dark matter and the discovery of gravitational waves from colliding black holes.

Priyamvada Natarajan is a theoretical astrophysicist at Yale. She is recognized for her seminal contributions to the study of dark matter and the formation and growth of black holes. She is a phenomenologist and uses gravitational lensing observations, the deflection of light rays by matter in the universe, to map the detailed distribution of dark matter. She works more generally on lensing tests of the theoretical predictions of the standard paradigm of structure formation. Another abiding interest has been the study of the growth history of black holes over cosmic time and, in particular, the formation of the first seed black holes. She has proposed and worked on models for the formation of massive black hole seeds, direct collapse black holes and their observational signatures.

Recipient of many awards and honors for her work including the Guggenheim and Radcliffe fellowships, she also holds the Sophie and Tycho Brahe Professorship at the Dark Cosmology Center at the University of Copenhagen, and an honorary professorship for life at the University of Delhi. A fellow of the American Physical Society, she is the incoming Chair of the Division of Astrophysics at the APS. Her work has been featured in numerous news outlets including NPR, BBC, CNN, NOVA, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, ScienceNews, Scientific American, New Scientist, National Geographic, Discover, and The New Yorker, in addition to many websites devoted to science.

Born and raised in India, she received undergraduate degrees in Physics and Mathematics at MIT. After graduate training in the History and Philosophy of Science at MIT’s Program in Science, Technology and Society, she obtained her PhD in Astrophysics from the University of Cambridge, where she was elected fellow of the Trinity College. Aside from research, she is also deeply invested in the public dissemination of science, especially in illuminating how the scientific process works via the history of ideas to the curious public. Her own writing has been published in many outlets including CNN, Washington Post, and the Huffington Post. She is a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and her first book, Mapping the Heavens: Radical Scientific Ideas that Reveal the Cosmos was published in May 2016 by Yale Press.

Date: Monday, January 22nd

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

t- hold - Leif Cocks

Gallery

See Britt/Ann

T-Hold Passer - Wolf Dinner

Club Closed - MLK Day

The Explorers Club will be closed today, Monday January 15th, in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will resume our regular operating hours on Tuesday the 16th at 9am.

T-Hold Passer - Wolf Dinner

Public Lecture Series with Jan Reynolds

Ancient Himalayan Salt Trade: Exploring Indigenous Life

Join Jan as she solos the Himalaya, over the Nangpa La, 20,000', the highest trade pass on earth, while working for National Geographic magazine. Jan finds and travels with some of the last great yak caravans trading salt over this pass which leads into Nepal, and the origins of the Sherpas. Sher Pa means east people in the Tibetan language. Come discover with Jan how the Sherpas came to be in Nepal, and what their traditional, indigenous life was like before Nepal opened itself up to climbing and trekking expeditions back in the 1950's.

Then travel with Jan as she searches to find the traditional Tuareg in the Sahara, the original "blue men" of Africa, the great salt traders of the desert. The Tuareg were most successful running the camel caravans across the Sahara because they could mysteriously find water underground. Join Jan as she travels on camel back with the Tuareg known as the fiercest raiders in the desert, where the saying goes, “Only the scorpion and the Tuareg are to be feared." But the Tuareg are a matrilineal society, where the men wear veils, not the women. The women tend to own the property, and can marry and divorce them men.

After exploring these two indigenous cultures, involved in the ancient salt trade in the highest mountains and the largest desert on earth, we will travel with Jan to research and visit an indigenous culture on each continent to appreciate indigenous life on earth on a global scale, eventually coming back full circle to the Himalayan salt traders and our original exploration.

Jan Reynolds holds several world climbing and skiing records set around the world, many in the Himalaya. She was a member of the U. S. Biathlon team, and even took a hot air balloon over Everest as part of an award winning film, Flight of the Windhorse. (They crashed, but set a record in the process) Jan is a writer/photographer/author/lecturer who spends her time in these remote places getting her story. She has also produced a book series, Vanishing Cultures, among her 20 non-fiction award winning books published, and exhibits her fine art photography.

She has been a member of expeditions to: China, Tibet, Nepal, New Zealand, Australia, Lapland, Amazon Basin, Canadian Arctic, Mongolia, Sahara. Held the women's high altitude skiing record, sponsored by National Geographic.

One of America's best known and articulate spoke's person on mountaineering, Jan has appeared on ABC's Good Morning America, NBC's Today, National Public Radio, New York Times, Merv Griffen, Hour Magazine, three adventure films.

Date: Monday, January 8

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8384

TENT. NGEN Weekend

Possible NGEN Weekend Event

See Britt

TENT. NGEN Weekend

Possible NGEN Weekend Event

See Britt

TENT. NGEN Weekend

Possible NGEN Weekend Event

See Britt

TENT. NGEN Weekend

Possible NGEN Weekend Event

See Britt

Eric Block Wedding

PS 153 Tour at 10:30

Asia Society Holiday Party

PS 153 Tour at 10:30

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Patricia Sutherland

A Meeting of Northern Worlds

Indigenous Peoples and the Norse in Arctic Canada

For almost five centuries, between about 1000 and 1450 AD, the Norse Greenlanders maintained a small European nation on the fringes of Arctic North America. Although the Greenlandic colonies were separated from Arctic Canada by less than 250 miles—roughly two days sail for the mariners of the time—surprisingly little is known of ventures to North America. The archaeological site at L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland confirms Icelandic saga accounts that the Norse established a short-lived outpost in Atlantic Canada around AD 1000 but there is no further evidence relating to these southern ventures. A number of Norse artifacts have also been found in the remains of early Inuit settlements dating to the 13th or 14th centuries, suggesting occasional trade or the salvage of a Norse shipwreck by Inuit who had recently arrived in the area from their Alaskan homeland.

Patricia Sutherland’s research has recently demonstrated the existence of a more significant European presence in the region that the Norse called “Helluland”, Baffin Island and the treeless regions of northern Labrador. During most of the time that the Norse Greenlandic colonies existed, this region was occupied by groups whom archaeologists refer to as Dorset culture, and who appear in Inuit oral history as Tuniit, an alien people who were encountered by the first Inuit immigrants to the area.

Investigating museum collections of archaeological material excavated from Dorset sites in the Eastern Arctic, Sutherland recognized many artifacts that are not known in the Indigenous technologies of northern North America, but which closely resemble the technologies associated with the Greenlandic Norse and other northern Europeans of the Viking and Mediaeval periods.

The lecture describes archaeological excavations concentrated at the Nanook site on Baffin Island, which has revealed the remains of architectural features including straight stone walls and a stonelined floor drain, similar to those found in mediaeval structures in Greenland and northern Europe. Evidence in support of a European identification for this complex includes the identification of two rat pelts associated with the structure, as well as spun cordage, tally-sticks, a portion of a crucible, and other items of European technology.

Analysis of cordage samples from Nanook and other Helluland sites indicates that the yarn is technically identical to that recovered from Greenlandic Norse farms but was spun from the hair of wild animals, primarily Arctic hare and fox rather than the wool of sheep and goats. Using scanning electron microscopy and spectrometry, Sutherland and her colleagues have identified a range of smelted metals on whetstones recovered from these sites, as well as abundant traces of copper-tin alloy (bronze) on the interior of a small stone vessel from the Nanook site, indicating that it had been used as a metalworking crucible.

Taken together with other evidence, these findings are beginning to assemble a picture indicating a significant European presence along the Atlantic-facing coasts of the eastern Arctic, and involving extensive contacts with the Dorset/Tuniit inhabitants of the region. This region supported sizable populations of walrus and the fur-bearing animals that were of prime interest to Norse commercial hunters.

The timing and duration of this episode is still not clearly understood. The majority of radiocarbon dates run on Helluland sites associated with European technology are earlier than the Norse occupation of Greenland. It is currently thought that most or all of these early dates result from problems involved in radiocarbon dating Arctic materials. However, we must also consider the possibility of a European presence occurring earlier than the traditional tenth-century date for the Norse discovery of Greenland.

The evidence from Helluland suggests a relatively extensive European presence in the eastern Arctic, a presence that may have begun earlier than previously suspected and which had considerable duration. These findings suggest a re-evaluation of early European knowledge and use of North America’s northern and eastern coasts, as well as of the assumed isolation of the Indigenous peoples of the region from events in the broader world.



Dr. Sutherland is a widely known North American archaeologist who has undertaken pioneering research into the history of remote northern regions of the continent. She received an Honours BA from the University of Toronto, and a PhD from the University of Alberta. Since 1975 she has been involved in archaeological research throughout Arctic Canada, and has collaborated on a number of international projects in Greenland. Her studies have included the Inuit and pre-Inuit occupations of the Arctic islands and the Mackenzie River Delta, the art and culture of the Dorset people, the Norse in the Eastern Arctic, and the lost Franklin expedition. She has also curated exhibitions on the cultures and history of Arctic Canada and has lectured on these subjects to audiences in Canada, the United States, and Europe.

She was project leader for the International Polar Year project Climatic Change and Historical Connections, 1000-1900 AD, and is principal investigator of the Helluland Archaeological Project. This research is focused on the question of Norse/Aboriginal contact in the eastern Arctic during the centuries around 1000 AD. Her work was featured in the November 2012 issue of National Geographic magazine, and was the subject of a 2012 documentary on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s premier science program The Nature of Things.

She is a Fellow of the Arctic Institute of North America, and The Explorers Club of New York has honored her with the Lowell Thomas Award for her accomplishments in field research and scientific exploration. She has also received the Canadian Museum’s Association’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research, as well as its Distinguished Service Award for significant contributions in museum work. Among her publications are edited volumes on The Franklin Era in Canadian Arctic History, 1845-59 and Contributions to the Study of Dorset Palaeo-Eskimos.

Her published papers range from the archaeology of the northern coast of British Columbia to shamanism and iconography of Palaeo-Eskimo art to the use of aerial photography in Arctic archaeology to relations between Indigenous peoples and early Europeans in the Eastern Arctic. Her most recent publication is a 2015 paper in the journal Geoarchaeology, on Evidence of Early Metalworking in Arctic Canada. She is currently an Adjunct Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, and a Research Fellow at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland.

Date: Monday, December 11

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid academic ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8383.

PS 153 Tour at 10:30

D - HOLD SATURDAY SCIENCE FOR STUDENTS

Date: December 9, 2017

Time: 9am Breakfast; 10am Lecture

Location: The Explorers Headquarters - 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price: FREE with a valid ACADEMIC student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please contact 212.628.8383; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Ann Passer Hold - The Eagle Huntress Film Screening

Annual Holiday Party - Conrad

HOLD FOR FAANYA ROSE'S EVENT - 2nd Floor

HOLD FOR FAANYA ROSE'S EVENT - 2nd Floor

Date: 12-06-2017

T- Hold - Ann Passer

See Ann. Possible Film Screening

Public Lecture Series with Sam Mehta

Japan – A Nation in Search of a New Path

Trilogy of Nations: Japan, Korea, and China

During the last ice age, the sea level was low enough to expose Japan, Korea and China as a part of the single landmass. The story of these East Asian countries has been interlinked ever since. China of course is the largest and had the most influence on Japan and Korea. The Chinese-influenced cultures have evolved differently based on their unique geography, history and culture. However, they are many similarities, thus appropriately the three great economies of Japan, Korea and China are often referred to as a trilogy of nations.

Throughout the history of Japan, Korea and China, a cultural legacy of Confucianism was infused into each country’s respective societies and had a profound effect on all aspects of life. Buddhism spread from China to Korea and Japan that helped shape spiritual codes of the societies. Contacts with European traders and missionaries shaped developments in the later centuries leading to a dramatic period of WWII. Since then the three great nations have chosen to shed feudal or imperial systems of government and experimented with communism or capitalism. Japan, Korea and China represent three good examples of modern economic miracles that have lifted millions of people out of poverty. However, they all have unique challenges as the 21st century unfolds and are pursuing different course for continued prosperity.

Sam Mehta’s presentation will take a deeper view of Japan. Japan’s influence from the Mainland China shaped foundations of the Japanese culture. However, because of Japan’s relative isolation of the archipelago gave rise a very distinct character found nowhere else in the region. Japan’s history is marked by an alternating period isolation from and connection with the neighbors with dramatic transformation of nation after WW II. Sam Mehta aims to show through his lens and narration, the character of this cultural Galapagos full of contracts between modern and traditional. Sam hopes to present diversity of Japanese landscapes, sites, architecture, arts and crafts, costumes, tea ceremony, exotic foods, pop culture, festivals and lingering legacy of Shintoism, Buddhism and Confucianism that continue to shape the Japanese way of life.

Through his images and words Sam will attempt to share fascinating people and places of Japan and highlight cultural elements that bind the trilogy together and self-interests and contractions that pull them apart. Sam will paint the state of current affairs. Japan is facing an aging and a declining population over the next few decades. Sam will share his views on Japan’s other key challenges ahead as the 21st century unfolds. Japan is nation in search of a new path since its progress is at standstill for the last two decades.

There are lesson to be learned from the West and West too has lessons to learn from Japan’s experiences. The story of Japan has implications of all with accelerating forces of globalization and mind-blowing technological changes and that is why this presentation is relevant for all.

Date: Monday, December 4

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

T-Hold - Liz Fried

Hold - Sharyn Runyon Event - 6-10 pm

T-hold - Janulis Private Event

See Britt

T-Hold - Safari Night

T-Hold - Safari Night

T- Hold - Janulis Private Event

2nd floor

See Britt

Public Lecture Series with Beverly Goodman

Tsunamis in the Mediterranean: Exploring the Past and Preparing for the Future

Coastlines and harbors are excellent places to live. Linkages to trade networks, ample resources, and attractive views have long drawn people to build villages, towns, and cities near to the waterline. However, there are risks as well; storms, floods, erosion, and tsunamis to name a few. In the Mediterranean, coastal cities have long been a central to the rise of civilizations, expansion of empires, and accumulation of wealth. King Herod knew this when about 2000 years ago he commissioned the construction of a massive megaharbor on the coastline of modern Israel.

This masterpiece, named Caesarea after Roman Emporer Caesar Augustus (Gaius Octavius Thurinus), brought great wealth and prominence to the region, but somehow fell partially into ruins, eventually becoming completely submerged. Discoveries in the past two decades have shown that a series of tsunamis have impacted Caesarea’s coastline. More recent modern tsunamis have helped to better understand and interpret the evidence at Caesarea, while the Caesarea evidence has been central for determining hazard potential in the highly populated eastern Mediterranean region.

Part of the challenge of understanding past events is the difficulty in finding and identifying their remains along the coastline. Tsunami deposits in populated areas are especially short-lived due to the capacity of people to clean-up post-disaster, and tendency to stay put and rebuild even when risks are apparent. Today there are many modern analogs that demonstrate this; the boxing day Tsunami of 2004, Japan 2012, Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy, and Harvey; to name only a few. The multiple events at Caesarea open a window to better understand these human responses to disaster. The offshore, underwater record is protected from much of post-disaster intervention, while the terrestrial deposits are vulnerable. The comparisons between what is seen on shore and offshore fill in the untold story of human response, resilience, and sometimes even social structure and interrelationships between nearby towns.

Unraveling these mysteries requires a complex web of field exploration onland and underwater, laboratory patience and dedication, and scouring libraries and archives. Dr. Goodman will share the story of the discovery of some of these ancient deposits, the challenges of the exploration and investigations, and ultimately what they have to teach us worldwide about living on coastlines and preparing for the future.

Dr. Beverly Goodman FI’08 is a marine geoarchaeologist who specializes in underwater archaeological sites, ancient harbors, tsunamis, sea-level and understanding coastal change. While the Mediterranean is her current home and primary research area, she also has active projects in the Red Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Ocean. She is an Assistant professor in the Leon Charney School of Marine Sciences at the University of Haifa, a National Geographic Explorer, serves on the scientific advisory board and trustees of EcoOcean, and has received numerous grants and awards worldwide. Her work on tsunamis in the eastern Mediterranean has been central for governmental coastal planning and risk assessment.

Date: Monday, November 27

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8384.

Hold - Bev Goodman Lecture

Adventure Club Tour - Corey William Schneider

6:30 tour with Will.

Can go to the bar after per Will.

See Britt.

Public Lecture Series with Greg Warden

New Light on the Ancient Etruscans: Discoveries at the Sanctuary of Poggio Colla in Tuscany

The Etruscans were one of the great powers of the Mediterranean in the first millennium BCE, but knowledge of their culture has remained elusive. Often referred to as a lost culture, their history and literature are lost, and we know them mostly from Greek and Roman accounts. The Etruscan language is still not well understood, and until recently the Etruscans were known primarily from their funerary remains, the vast cemeteries of central Italy that have been haphazardly excavated since the Renaissance.

Recent scientific exploration of settlements and sanctuaries (not just tombs!) is providing new information about all aspects of Etruscan society. At the forefront of this research has been the site of Poggio Colla, a hilltop sanctuary and vast settlement at the northern edge of Tuscany, in the foothills of the Apennines about 22 miles northeast of Florence, that has been explored by a group of American and English universities since 1995. The sanctuary proper has produced monumental architecture that spans centuries of Etruscan history as well as a dramatic series of rich deposits (including bronze figurines, gold jewelry, coins, etc.) which shed new light on Etruscan ritual. Most important, the settlement documents the life of all strata of society, not just the elites.

Of particular interest has been the evidence for the activity of the Etruscan women who had a pivotal role in the life of the sanctuary. In addition to the evidence for female agency, the site has produced a sanctuary that was dedicated to a female divinity, a cult seemingly connected to fertility through worship at an underground fissure. Exceptional was the discovery of ceramics showing the earliest scene of childbirth in European art, and most recently the sanctuary has produced a remarkable stone stele that has one of the longest Etruscan inscriptions found to date. It is one of the three longest Etruscan sacred texts ever found, and it is the earliest as well as the only one with a secure archaeological context. Its decipherment offers substantial challenges, but it promises to shed new light on Etruscan culture and religion.

Greg Warden is President and Professor of Archaeology at Franklin University Switzerland. He is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus at SMU and consulting Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology. His research and teaching have been supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities and have been featured in the documentary, Etruscan Odyssey, Exponding Archdeology. Warden is the founder, Principal Investigator, and co-Director of the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project. Since 1995 this international project has trained students from over seventy universities and has included scholars from seven countries; it has been featured in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, in the European media, as well as on the Discovery Channel. Warden was awarded the title of Cavaliere (Knight) in the Order of the Star of Italy by the Republic of Italy for his sustained contributions to Italian culture.

Date: Monday, November 20

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

D - HOLD SATURDAY SCIENCE FOR STUDENTS

Date: November 18, 2017

Time: 9am Breakfast; 10am Lecture

Location: The Explorers Headquarters - 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price: FREE with a valid ACADEMIC student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please contact 212.628.8383; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Young Explorers Program - 10-12 am

Hold - Conrad Anker - Clark Room evening

Will request on 5/23

t-hold for Erikson

Gallery for now.

See britt or Ann

James Passin_Gallery

Hold - Royal Navy College of Greenwich Event

Public Lecture Series with John Perkins

Peary, the North Pole, and the Power of Narrative

Admiral Robert E. Peary, an American naval engineer, spent 23 years in the High Arctic, three times longer than any other outsider in his day. He re-wrote the playbook on Polar travel, honing his tactics during two first-ever crossings of the northern Greenland Ice Cap, and then during four successive attempts at the Pole, all by dogsled rigged in the traditional manner of the Inughuit -- the isolated Inuit group living further north than any other humans on Earth.

Whereas -- as Peary himself demonstrated -- the Pole was situated in the midst of the Arctic Ocean, under a layer of constantly shifting pack ice, and therefore could not bear a permanent marker of an explorer's presence -- the north coast of Greenland, being solid land, could. Peary's numerous stone carins, complete with penned notes in bottles, found by modern explorers on the headlands of that coast exactly where Peary said he'd placed them, attest to the man's veracity.

Still more telling were the ocean depth soundings his team made, at great effort, on their way out. That is until at about a day's trip from the Pole, the sounding line parted and went to the bottom. Only in the days of nuclear submarines and sonar were these soundings confirmed and found to be accurate.

His two Ice Cap crossings were quite a bit longer than his Polar attempts, and required higher sustained speeds. For the latter -- near-suicidal dogsled sprints to and back over shifting ocean pack ice with absolutely no chance of rescue -- basic math will reveal that Peary and his companions averaged a mere marathon-per-day, not the 38 miles often quoted. Peary's rate, though remarkable, is nevertheless perfectly possible, as shown by subsequent explorers duplicating his route under similar circumstances, most recently the gifted British adventurer, Tom Avery, in 2004.

A fault of Peary was his unwillingness to play to the public. They took him as imperious and a poor sport, for his stony silence when he came home from the Pole, only to find that in his absence a publicity hound named F. A. Cook fabricated the claim that he had reached the Pole a full year before him. Cook, egged on by a sensationalist press, inflamed the public, casting himself as the daring loner going up against the deep-pocketed Peary machine. The public grew to mistrust them both, and its romance with the North was poisoned.

John Perkins will examine their relationship, and the coverage of their reputed endeavors, in coordination with evidence from more contemporary expeditions, to demystify their claims and shed light on the power of narrative and public discourse in shaping the perception of human accomplishments.

Date: Monday, November 13

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price: $5 with a valid academic ID at the door

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Nina Galbiati Cocktail Reception

Sea Stories 2017

Sea Stories is a day focused on exploration, conservation, scuba diving, shipwrecks, nautical history and marine life. This will be a great opportunity for those who are interested in the ocean to interact. Tickets will NOT be sold at door.

9:00 AM Registration – coffee & continental breakfast
10:00 AM Presentations commence
12:00 PM Lunch
1:00 PM Presentations continue
5:00 PM Cocktail Party
7:00 PM Conclusion


Jennifer Hayes FN’03 - “Islands to Ice”

Pummeled by sturgeon and saved by seals, Ms. Hayes journeyed on a National Geographic assignment through the St. Lawrence Seaway from the 1,000 Islands to life in the ice with harp seals.

Ms. Hayes is a contributing photographer and speaker for National Geographic and also contributed to numerous global publications and authored/contributed to books on marine environments. She is an aquatic biologist and directed her focus to photojournalism specializing in natural history, conservation and the documentation of freshwater and marine environments.

Her academic passions lead to graduate degrees in marine ecology and zoology with research focused on shark finning and the population dynamics and movements of an ancient fish - sturgeon. Ms. Hayes is a trustee of the Shark Research Institute, editorial board advisor for Ocean Geographic and recipient of the President’s medal for contributions to the natural world.

Professor David Freestone - “Protecting the Golden Rain Forest of the Atlantic: the Sargasso Sea"

Dr. Freestone works with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and is Executive Secretary of the Sargasso Sea Commission seeking to put protection measures in place for this unique high sea ecosystem.

He is a Visiting Fellow and Professorial Lecturer at the George Washington University Law School in Washington D.C., where he teaches international climate change law. Dr. Freestone is a co-Rapporteur of the International Law Association Committee on sea level rise and international law. He previously served at the World Bank as Chief Counsel and head of the environment and international law group.

Dr. Freestone is founding Editor in Chief of the International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law and has written widely on international environmental law and law of the sea. He is the 2007 winner of the Elizabeth Haub Gold Medal for Environmental Law.

Erick Higuera - “Mexican Sapphire - Mexican Sapphire - the Astonishing Marine Life in the Waters of the Baja California Peninsula"

Mr. Higuera is an award winning underwater filmmaker, photographer and marine biologist exploring for over 20 years the waters of Guadalupe Island, the Sea of Cortez and the Revillagigedo Islands filming and photographing great white sharks, whales, dolphins, sailfish and other spectacles in the deep blue off Mexico's Pacific shores.

His work appeared on Discovery Channel, Shark Week, BBC, Shark BBC, BBC Blue Planet II, National Geographic, as well in the award-winning documentary feature México Pelagico.

He is the founder of KEPPBAJABLUE whose mission is to build awareness so that the world can share in the rich biodiversity of the Baja California peninsula. Mr. Higuera conducts scientific research with photo identification, satellite tagging, site fidelity, abundance estimates, and movements patterns of the Pacific Giant Mantas in México

Evan Kovacs - “Antikythera Shipwreck”

The Antikythera (circa 60 B.C.) is the richest ancient wreck ever discovered; yielding hundreds of works of art including bronze and marble statues that now fill galleries at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens. The wreck also relinquished a mysterious clockwork device, the Antikythera Mechanism.

Mr. Kovacs, with over 20 years diving experience, has been working alongside the archaeologists from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Hellenic Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities, filming the discoveries.

He owns Marine Imaging Technologies, specializes in imaging the underwater world for documentary, science, and survey. He works with the WHOI and filmed with the deep submersible ALVIN, Pisces submersibles and with numerous ROV’s around the world. Mr. Kovacs helped build and operate numerous imaging systems to film for broadcast, museums, archaeologists and Institutions across the world.

Lars-Kristian Trellevik - “The Art of Doing Very Difficult Things at Awesome Ocean Depths”

Mr. Trellevik is the founder of Gonangia Exploration and his experience includes more than 20 successful salvage and research operations to depths between 3,500 and 5,500 meters.

Mr. Trellevik has been involved in high profile projects such as the engine recovery from the Apollo 11 spacecraft (4,200 meters), the silver cargo recovery from the Gairsoppa (4,750 meters), and Hot-Smokers Survey with the University of Bergen, (3,700 meters).

He is a geographer and a systems thinker. Mr. Trellevik has 15 years’ experience in the subsea industry as cartographer, surveyor, offshore manager and project/operations manager and focused on seabed survey and ultra-deep operations.


Date: Saturday, November 11, 2017

Time: 9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Tickets are $65, if purchased after November 6: $70. Student tickets are $30, and $35 if purchased after November 6.

To reserve, you may also call us a 212.628.8384, or email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Kim Kosa_The Gallery or Second Floor_Dinner

Lina Connolly_Gallery

Palmer Ramsey

Palmer Ramsey

T-Hold - Alvaro / Ann

Riverdale

Second floor, cocktail party

See Britt

Hold - Board Room - Clark Foundation - 2pm – 4pm

Public Lecture Series with Dr. Geoff Tabin

Impossible Dreams

The First Ascent of the East Face of Mt. Everest and Eliminating Preventable and Treatable Blindness

Dr. Geoff Tabin FN'85 is a Professor of Surgery and Ophthalmology at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Co-Director of the Himalayan Cataract Project, recently featured on 60 Minutes. Geoff was a former Associate Professor of Surgery and Ophthalmology at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. He was the fourth person to climb the “7 Summits,” the highest point of all seven continents; and has pioneered difficult technical rock, ice, and mountaineering routes on all seven continents including the East Face of Mt. Everest.

Dr. Tabin is a graduate of Yale College, Oxford University (on a Marshall Scholarship) and Harvard Medical School. He completed a general surgery internship at The University of Colorado Hospitals, a residency in ophthalmology at Brown University and a corneal fellowship at Melbourne University in Australia. He then spent a year teaching eye surgery in Nepal. In 1994 he co-founded the Himalayan Cataract Project, which strives to eradicate preventable and curable blindness in the Himalaya through high quality ophthalmic care, education, and establishment of a world-class eye care infrastructure.

The story of Dr. Tabin and the founding of the Himalayan Cataract Project is told in Second Suns by David Oliver Relin, available in paperback from The Experiment Publishing. Second Suns is the unforgettable true story of two very different doctors with a common mission: to rid the world of preventable blindness. Dr. Geoffrey Tabin was the high-achieving “bad boy” of his class at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Sanduk Ruit grew up in a remote village in the Himalayas, where cataract blindness—easily curable in modern hospitals—amounts to an epidemic. Together, they pioneered a new surgical method, by which they have helped restore sight to over 4 million people—all for about $20 per operation.

Date: Monday, November 6

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click Here to Purchase Tickets Online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8383.

Boy Scouts Event

Day event - Second Floor
See Britt

Hold - Film Screening - "Letters From Baghdad" - Clark Room

Carl Safina Dinner Second Floor

Hold - Ann Passer - BEES

Hold - Stecher and Horowitz

Public Lecture Series with Dario Schwoerer

The TOPtoTOP Global Climate Expedition

Dario Schwoerer, a Swiss climatologist and international ski-and mountain guide (UIAGM), experienced the fragile environment he refers to as “his office” degrading rapidly and decided to dedicate his life to educating the public on how to respect nature and protect it for future generations. Joined by his wife Sabine, they founded TOPtoTOP with the goal of being the first expedition traversing the seven seas and reaching the highest peaks on each of the seven continents, relying only on the power of nature and the human spirit.

The Schwoerer’s journey in their expedition sailboat Pachamama (Inca for Mother Earth) has taken them over 110,000 nautical miles to more than 100 countries. Along the way they have made presentations on climate change to more than 100,000 students. Their message is one of hope designed to inspire students and communities to act for a better future by sharing experiences of nature’s beauty and resiliency, and presenting innovations for a healthy planet.

Dario and Sabine are not alone in their efforts to engage with students. During their journey they have had six children, who along with volunteers participate in classroom presentations demonstrating that progress towards important conservation goals can be achieved in balance with nature. Together, Dario and Sabine Schwörer, their children and TOPtoTOP volunteers are collecting, documenting and disseminating vital first-hand climate impacts from around the world, teaching students to celebrate nature and protect their natural environments, and bringing a important message of hope to a planet seeking a healthy future.

Date: Monday, October 30

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $25

Reservation Notes:

Click here to purchase tickets online

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, you may also call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

D - HOLD SATURDAY SCIENCE FOR STUDENTS

Date: 10-28-2017

Time: 9am Breakfast; 10am Lecture

Location: The Explorers Headquarters - 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021

Member Ticket Price: $10

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price: FREE with a valid ACADEMIC student ID

The 2017 Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner

Click here to purchase tickets online


The 2017 Lowell Thomas Award Winners


HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco, FI ‘14
Prince Albert II of Monaco has long been dedicated to the protection of the environment and focuses on fighting climate change, promoting renewable energy, combating the loss of biodiversity, and preserving water resources through his Prince Albert II Foundation. He has also participated in research expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic, thus becoming the first head of state to reach both poles. He is a member of the Ocean Elders group and serves on the Advisory Committee for Students on Ice.

Donn Haglund, Ph.D., FE ‘72
Dr. Haglund is a Professor Emeritus of Geography at the University of Wisconsin, where he created and taught a pioneering Arctic wilderness field course for more than 40 years. He earned his Ph.D. in economic geography from the University of Pennsylvania, based on work done in Greenland. He is recognized internationally for his expertise in maritime transport in support of Arctic economic development, and for his dedication to scientific research in these areas.

Martin T. Nweeia D.M.D., D.D.S, FN ‘99
Dr. Martin Nweeia is a research scientist, explorer, professor and scholar on the functional significance of the narwhal tusk and Inuit knowledge. His landmark studies on narwhal tusk sensory function have earned him nine grants from the National Science Foundation, as well as awards from The National Geographic Society, Harvard University, and the Smithsonian Institution. He is currently lecturer at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, a clinical assistant professor at Case School of Dental Medicine, and a research associate in vertebrate zoology at the Smithsonian Institution.

Konrad Steffen
Dr. Konrad Steffen is Director, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research and Professor, Institute of Atmosphere & Climate, ETH-Zurich. Previously he was Director CIRES, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, and Professor Emeritus of Geography, both positions at University of Colorado Boulder. His interests include climate and cryosphere interaction in polar and alpine regions. In particular he researches sea level changes sensitivity studies of large ice sheets using in situ and modeling results.

Click here to purchase tickets online




Hosted by our Canadian Chapter, the 2017 Lowell Thomas Awards Dinner is slated for October 28th at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. There will be a full weekend of events from Friday, October 27th until Sunday, October 29th. We'll see you in Toronto!

Painting by Cory Trépanier MI'09 (detail)
"Great Glacier, 15 ft x 5.5 ft, oil on linen, Coronation Fiord, Auyuittuq National Park, Nunavut, Canada
intothearctic.ca/

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Background image photography courtesy of members Christoph Baumer, Neil Laughton, Matt Harris and Don Walsh's image of the Bathyscape Trieste