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NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY Wild Film Festival

NY WILD Film Festival Option 2

NY WILD Film Festival Option 2

NY WILD Film Festival Option 2

NY WILD Film Festival Option 2

NY WILD Film Festival Option 2

David Brooks

Denis Belliveau_YPO_Second Floor

Sea Stories 2015

Sea Stories is day focused on exploration, conservation, scuba diving, shipwrecks, nautical history and marine life. This will be a great opportunity for those who are interested in the ocean to interact. Tickets will NOT be sold at door.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

9 AM - 7:00 PM

9:00 AM Registration – coffee & continental breakfast
10:00 AM Presentations commence
12:00 PM Lunch
1:00 PM Presentations continue
5:00 PM Reception
7:00 PM Conclusion

Julie Russ Arizona State Second Floor

Public Lecture Series feat. Lee Durrell

Saving Species from Extinction

Past, Present and Future of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust
This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

With Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust well into its second half century, Lee Durrell reflects on the past, present and future of this remarkable institution. It was founded in Jersey, an island in the English Channel, by Gerald Durrell, the popular nature writer and Lee’s late husband, with the mission to save species from extinction.

The Trust began as a modest zoo, but became a pioneer in approaches and techniques to restore endangered species and their habitats, working with local communities. It has rescued dozens of species from the brink of extinction and trains conservation professionals from all over the world to do the same. It is now recognized as a world leader in biodiversity conservation

Lee will tell the story from the earliest successes to the latest endeavors, from the Mauritius kestrel, reduced to four birds in the 1970s, to the Montserrat mountain chicken, not a chicken, but a giant frog, which plummeted to near extinction in 2009. She will speak about Durrell’s own staff currently undertaking 50 projects in a dozen countries and the thousands of graduates of Durrell Conservation Academy, who are now saving species in their home countries in a network known as Durrell’s Army.

Lee McGeorge Durrell was born in 1949 in Memphis, Tennessee. She received a BA in philosophy from Bryn Mawr College and a PhD in zoology from Duke University.

Lee married Gerald Durrell, founder of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, in 1979. She was instrumental in re-opening Madagascar to western scientists during the early 1980’s. She influenced the development of the Trust’s field projects, particularly in Madagascar where she launched a recovery programme for the world's rarest tortoise. Lee’s first book, The State of the Ark (1986), was a comprehensive review of species conservation.

Lee and Gerald wrote books and presented several television series together, including Ark on the Move, The Amateur Naturalist and Durrell in Russia. Their four-month expedition to Madagascar in 1990 to collect endangered species for breeding programs resulted in a television documentary To the Island of the Aye-Aye, which won the Gold Award at the New York International Film and Television Festival.

In 1995 Lee succeeded Gerald as Honorary Director of the Trust, playing an important role as ambassador and fund-raiser. In 1999 she learned to fly light aeroplanes and assisted the Trust for a number of years by flying animals to and from Jersey for breeding programs. In 2014 she set up a support group in the US called American Friends of Durrell.

In 2011 Lee was awarded the MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) in recognition of her services to biodiversity conservation.

Lee looks forward to speaking at The Explorers Club, where she will continue the story her late husband told there more than 40 years ago.

Date: November 9th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Denis Belliveau_YPO_Second Floor

The 4th Annual Polar Film Festival

Call for Entires!

The Explorers Club is proud to announce our fourth annual Polar Film Festival.

The time has come to start the search for this year's films, falling under the following catagories:

• Conservation
• Adventure
• Environment
• Human interest
• Expeditions

We are accepting feature length to short films.

The due date for submissions is Thursday, July 30th, 2015.

Please mail DVD entries to:
The Explorers Club
c/o Stefan Kindberg
46 East 70th Street,
New York, NY, 10021

For digital entries, upload to Vimeo. Enable "add to" feature and email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

POLAR FILM FESTIVAL - Hold

POLAR FILM FESTIVAL - Hold

Date: 11-07-15

The 4th Annual Polar Film Festival

Call for Entires!

The Explorers Club is proud to announce our fourth annual Polar Film Festival.

The time has come to start the search for this year's films, falling under the following catagories:

• Conservation
• Adventure
• Environment
• Human interest
• Expeditions

We are accepting feature length to short films.

The due date for submissions is Thursday, July 30th, 2015.

Please mail DVD entries to:
The Explorers Club
c/o Stefan Kindberg
46 East 70th Street,
New York, NY, 10021

For digital entries, upload to Vimeo. Enable "add to" feature and email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

POLAR FILM FESTIVAL - Hold

POLAR FILM FESTIVAL - Hold

Date: 11/6/2015

Newbury Partners_Second Floor

Public Lecture Series feat. Alfred McLaren

Silent and Unseen:
On Submarine Patrol During the Cold War

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

In this beautifully illustrated presentation, veteran submarine commander Captain Alfred S. McLaren will describe the most significant events that occurred in the Arctic and other regions during the Cold War years, 1958 to 1973, on board five attack submarines: USS Greenfish (SS-351), USS Seadragon (SSN-584), USS Skipjack (SSN 585), USS Greenling (SSN-614), and USS Queenfish (SSN-651). His seven years aboard the first three boats are the subject of his most recent book, Silent and Unseen, and the remaining eight, the subject of an earlier book Unknown Waters and a third book yet to come.

This talk will focus on the development of attack-boat tactics, Cold War missions, and under-ice exploration techniques and achievements, such as surfacing at the North Pole and the historic first surveys of the Northwest Passage and the entire Siberian Continental Shelf.

The talk will also describe how the commanding officers that a young submarine officer served with will determine how well he is prepared to assume his own command years later, This was particularly true in attack submarines during the high-risk years of the Cold War, when attack submarines were continually at sea and each reconnaissance and intelligence collection mission was of potentially great, and sometimes extraordinary, value to the government of the United States of America. The missions more often than not required closing on a potential enemy to collect the intelligence required, generally within weapons range. They required, unlike a war patrol, the U.S. attack boat to remain completely undetected, and then to withdraw as silently and unseen as it approached.

The success of all Cold War missions depended heavily on accurate intelligence, geographical positioning of the boat, and the readiness of the individual attack-boat team. It will be seen how the speaker learned very early that the latter was forged from three inseparable parts: material readiness of the boat, training and deployment readiness of the crew, and the knowledge, experience, and physical and psychological readiness of the commanding officer.

Captain Alfred Scott McLaren, USN (Ret.), Ph.D., MED ’71, is a former President of The Explorers Club and currently President of the 80-year-old American Polar Society. He is also a Director of Sub Aviator Systems LLC and Senior Pilot of the Super Aviator submersible. As a career nuclear attack submarine officer, he made three Arctic expeditions: the first submerged transit of the Northwest Passage, a Baffin Bay expedition, and, as Commander of USS Queenfish (SSN-651), a North Pole expedition that completed the first survey of the entire Siberian Continental Shelf. Honors include The Explorers Club’s Lowell Thomas Medal for Ocean Exploration in 2000 and its highest honor, “The Explorers Club Medal” in 2012 for “ His extraordinary contributions to Arctic exploration and deep sea research, including the first survey of the entire Siberian Continental Shelf.” He has also received ”The Societe de Geographic Paris" Medal and La Medaille de La Ville De Paris for Polar exploration.

Awards as a Cold War Submarine Commander include: the Distinguished Service Medal, two Legions of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, and four Navy Unit Commendations. A deep sea explorer and scientist, he completed dives to: RMS Titanic, Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, and the first manned dives to the German battleship Bismarck. His first book, Unknown Waters, A First-Hand Account of the Historic Under-Ice Survey of the Siberian Continental Shelf by USS Queenfish (SSN-651) (University of Alabama Press, 2008), was judged a “Notable Naval Book of 2008” by the U.S. Naval Institute. His second book, Silent and Unseen, On Patrol in Three Cold War Attack Submarines (U.S. Naval Institute Press, 2015) was released in May 2015. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and U.S. Naval War College. He holds graduate degrees from George Washington, Cambridge, and Colorado Universities.

Date: October 19th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC student members, $5 with a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Public Lecture Series feat. Russell Heath


An Errant Circumnavigation

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

This is the story, in part, of a four year, 37,000 mile circumnavigation. Except for two passages, Russell Heath sailed alone on a 25 foot wooden Vertue—a classic design from the 1930s—named Kainui. He sailed without electronics, an inboard engine, and with never more than a few thousand dollars at hand. When he left, his only experience on a sailboat was keeping out of the way. He did not know how to reef a sail, set an anchor, or navigate.

There were adventures, near misses, lonely times under the night sky and, also, times of wonder, of exultation, of being touched by the beauty of the sea, the sky, and the kindness of strangers. The five or six stories that Heath will share are the stories that, in the round of a journey, define that journey and shape who he, the traveler, became.

There is the story of the first day, being tossed by a gale and retching over the rail, yet continuing on; of traversing the intertropical convergence zone that was this sailor’s rite of passage; of the run from the Galapagos down to Pitcairn Island with still shaky celestial navigation skills and learning the joy given by the daily tasks of living; of desolate months in Fiji and New Zealand empty of purpose and ready to quit; of being knocked down crossing the Tasman Sea; of beating off the night coast of Spain exhausted and frightened because his judgment was so shot that he could not keep safe; of the day he came home, late on a summer evening, Venus brilliant in a burgundy sky; and of setting, with the traveler’s ambivalence of one journey finished and the next one yet unknown, Kainui’s anchor in good American mud.

Russell Heath has been in the thick of the action since he was a kid—in his teens he hitchhiked to Alaska and lived in a cabin on the banks of the Tanana River; in his twenties, he lived in Italy, crossed the Sahara and the jungles and savannas of Africa and then traveled south and east through Asia; in his thirties, he sailed around the world (alone); in his forties, he wrote novels no one would publish; and in his fifties he bicycled the spine of the Rockies from Alaska to Mexico. He worked on the Alaska Pipeline, as an environmental lobbyist in the Alaska Legislature, and ran a storied environmental organization fighting (successfully) to protect Alaska’s rainforests. Several years ago, he moved to New York City to dig deep into leadership development and coaching. He now coaches business and non-profit leaders as well as people who want to live rich, zesty, hand-crafted lives.

Date: October 5th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Public Lecture Series featuring Mark Evans


Arabia Felix – on the trail of a forgotten explorer

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

In the 1930s, thanks to the exploits of Lowell Thomas and T E Lawrence of Arabia, the western world was obsessed with Arabia; the Rub Al Khali, or Empty Quarter, was considered the largest expanse of unexplored land outside of Antarctica. Setting off from Salalah in southern Oman, after a journey of 60 days, English explorer Bertram Thomas and his team of Bedouin companions finally reached Doha, the capital of Qatar. Unable to communicate his achievements, he then had to sail by Dhow to the Telegraph office in Bahrain to announce that the largest sand desert on earth had been crossed. Telegrams of congratulations came in from around the world, and the story was front page news in The Times in London, and The New York Times. Thomas was awarded the Cullum Medal in New York, and the Founders Medal in London at the Royal Geographical Society, and his book, Arabia Felix, told the tale of an extraordinary journey that contributed a great deal to science. The photographs and video footage shot by Thomas (and recently digitised) represent some of the earliest images of Arabia.

Thomas walked into terra incognita. He was about to be sacked for incompetence, had no funding, no map, and no way of communicating to anyone where he was for 60 days. Ask people today who is the first person the cross the great sand desert of Arabia, and the most common answer will be Wilfred Thesiger. Undoubtedly gifted with a pen, and a camera, but able to benefit from maps, the experiences of Thomas, and 18 years advance of technology, Thesiger has evolved into an iconic figure of desert exploration, and the exploits of Thomas have been forgotten.

In 1932, Bertram Thomas stood up in New York and addressed Explorers Club members on his successful crossing, a journey which is to be re-traced 85 years later by small team of Arabs and an Englishman later in 2015. The lecture will tell the tale of the original journey, and will share plans for the new, that begins in November 2015.

Mark Evans is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in London, and an International Fellow of the Explorers Club. 54 years old, Evans is the Executive Director of Outward Bound Oman, the only Outward Bound School in the Arab world. He has a passion for historical exploration; recent expeditions have seen him leading a two man crossing the Greenland Ice-Cap on the trail of Nansen, being surrounded by Arctic Wolves on the uninhabited Melville Island in the NWT of Canada, on the trail of the first ever overland journey in the Arctic by the British Navy in 1827, an spending a year, including 4 months of total darkness living in small tents on the Norwegian island of Svalbard, home to the largest population of Polar Bears. For the past 20 years Evans has lived in the Middle East, where he has explored and travelled extensively in Saudi Arabia, on in Oman, where he recently completed a 55 day solo kayak journey along the coast from Musandam, near Iran, to the border with Yemen.

Date: September 21st, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC student members, $5 with a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a place, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Jeremy (Sven’s Son) Wedding

D-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10-pm

D-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10-pm

Date: 09-18-15

D-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10pm

D-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10pm

Date: 09-17-15

T-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10pm

T-HOLD Fashion Week (Per Luis Muga), 12pm - 10pm

Date: 09-16-15

Tony Chimblo_Second Floor

Public Lecture Series featuring Zoltan Takacs


Nature-to-Medicine: In Search of Lifesaving Animals

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

Nature's deadliest animals — snakes, scorpions, spiders — take 100,000 human lives a year, 6 times more than landmines. Yet the very same creatures are also the biggest lifesavers of the Animal Kingdom. Taken by 40+ million people, 20 medicines are derived from animal venoms for heart attack, high blood pressure, heart failure, diabetes, and cancer and HIV pain, etc. — including 2 of the top 3 heart attack medicines, as well as the #5 most-prescribed medicine in the U.S.

This presentation is a science-driven, adventure-packed, high-octane, around-the-world research journey that reveals what it takes to travel to the last frontiers on Earth, team up with exotic tribes, face the unforgivable elements and armed criminals, to find the deadliest (yet often stunningly beautiful) animals... and still walk out alive. From Sudan to Fiji, from Brazil to Nepal it is never-ending obstacle course for the sake of science.

Along the journey are the first-hand experiences in tropical clinics, U.S. research labs and hospitals that reveal how animal venoms can be turned into medicines, what is their impact to date, and what is the full potential ahead for nature's deadliest molecules to save human lives. The lecture is vividly illustrated by first class visuals that tell the story — Zoltan is an accomplished wildlife photographer and videographer with various National Geographic credits.



Dr. Zoltan Takacs is a pharmacologist specializing in drug discovery from animal venoms. He is the founder and president of the World Toxin Bank project. He is a co-inventor of the designer toxin technology, a toxin-genomics drug discovery platform developed at the University of Chicago, and holds patent rights to scorpion toxin-derived drug leads for autoimmune diseases. Passionate about snakes and exploration since childhood, Zoltan has traveled to 145 countries, is an aircraft pilot, scuba diver, and wildlife photographer. He holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University, was a researcher at Rockefeller University and Yale University before joining as a faculty at the University of Chicago. He served as an Earth Institute Fellow at Columbia University, he is a National Geographic Society Emerging Explorer. Zoltan's work has been featured in the National Geographic Magazine, on the National Geographic Channel, BBC, ABC, PBS/NOVA, Rai3, and RTL.

Date: September 14th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC student members, $5 with a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a place, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Ashley Holmes Wedding

Hold - Tour with Corey William Schneider & NY Adventure Club - W. Roseman - 6:30pm

Hold - Tour with Corey William Schneider & NY Adventure Club - W. Roseman, per request on 5/1

Hold - Three Island Summer BBQ

Andrew Gulli_Second Floor

BMO_David Maris

BMO_David Maris

Hold - HEINEKEN USA President Dinner Send Off

Hold - HEINEKEN USA President Dinner Send Off, per Will request on 4/23

NMS Management_Second Floor

Hold - Heineken CEO - Private Dinner

Hold - Heineken CEO - Private Dinner & Tour, per email request of Will on 4/15

Ghurka Event - 70 -80 people

Can you please reserve June 11th for Ghurka - 70 -80 people on the calendar. Ian is the the contact.

Regards,
Will

sent -- 4/23

Aurea Sanabria

Hold - Short Story Thursdays at The Explorers Club

Hold for Short Story Thursdays at The Explorers Club, per Emerald on 4/28

Public Lecture Series featuring Sam Mehta


The Silk Road: Modern Iran and Ancient Persia


The Silk Road, often referred to as the backbone of history, was a nexus of trade routes that ran from Western China into the Middle East, through Persia and into the Mediterranean. The 5,000-mile route of the ancient Silk Road traveled through more than a dozen countries, crossing some of the most spectacular and inaccessible regions on earth. Sam will cover one of those countries in his presentation: Ancient Persia and modern Iran.

Mehta will share images of his journey along the Silk Road in Iran including Teheran, Shiraz, Isfahan, Yazd and Persepolis. Iran effectively controlled the overland Silk Road. No one could travel its length without crossing the Iranian plateau, and Iran got rich by taxing the goods passing through. But sometimes, the Persians themselves became invaders using the Royal Road built by Darius. Parthian and Sassanid successors continued to improve the infrastructure of the Silk Road. Eventually the Arab conquest brought Islam. Later, Turks, Assassins and Mongols ravaged Persia for centuries until the stability of the Ottoman Empire and its Persian counterparts – the Safavids – brought an age of enlightenment.

Specifically, Sam will transport you to Iran through his incredible images with intellectually stimulating narration and experience…

Modern Iran – Teheran and its surrounding areas. Teheran is a relatively modern city with many world-class museums and sites. You will experience life on the street, as well.

Caravan Desert City – Yazd and the surrounding areas. Yazd is in a remote area relatively protected from Arab and Mongol invasions. Life and culture have prospered despite the harsh desert conditions, partly thanks to the caravan route of the Silk Road.

Ancient Persia – Shiraz and the surrounding areas. This region was home to the Achaemenid and the Sassinid empires, and it reflects their architecture, art and glory. Nearby, nomad tribes living as they have done for centuries, have made Bishapur their home. The rich history of Ancient Persia will make you appreciate why the Persian Empire became the first superpower of the civilized world.

The Golden Age of Islamic Culture – Isfahan and the surrounding areas. Isfahan became one of the most celebrated and beautiful cities of the world in the 16th century. You will experience the best bazaars, extraordinary architecture and art, as well as life in Jewish and Armenian Quarters.

Current Affairs – Iran’s Theocracy. Sam’s assessment of the situation is based on interviews on the ground, supported by published research. He will share how the current government policies have affected life in Iran and the outlook.

Sam’s presentation will deepen your understanding of one of the more difficult-to-travel places in the world in a way that will further stimulate your curiosity.

Date: 6/1/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8383.

Hold - Absolute Travel Event - Uganda/Rwanda Gorillas w/ Praveen Moman

Hold - Absolute Travel Event - Uganda/Rwanda Gorillas w/ Praveen Moman, per emails with Katie Losey on 1/28 -KM

Date: 05/27/2015

Bartle Bull Lunch 12-2

Hold - A Room for 10 Guests - Brianna Rowe Graduation Suare - Evening

Hold - W. Medical Strategy group - Clark Room - 1-4pm

Hey Kevin,

Please put a room hold on May 21st for the Clark Room from 1-4 PM for the W. Medical Strategy group.

Thank you,
Mimi

Hold - Breuninger Photo Shoot

Hold - Breuninger Photo Shoot, Kevin addition on 4/28

Hold - Trophy Room for Randell Dinner - Evening

Hold - Trophy Room for Randell Dinner - Evening

Per Will request, guy who used to be associated with Man of the World magazine, 5/1

Hold - Film Screening - Wonders of the Arctic

Hold - Film Screening - Wonders of the Arctic, per Ross von Burg on 4/10/2015

NYC - Public Lecture Series feat. Dr. George Veni


Karst: Explore the Hidden Quarter of Planet Earth


Simply the most fascinating, weirdly beautiful, and least known landscape on Earth, karst covers about 25% of the globe’s land area but few have heard of it. Fewer know what it is. Karst is a strange landscape, and much of it hides underground as caves. Karst swallows the flows of rivers and gushes them back to the surface far away. Karst is home to unique and bizarre life forms. Karst holds the biggest keys to unlocking the mysteries of past climates to best predict future climate. Karst protects one-of-kind artifacts from long-ago peoples. Karst is the holy land, not just physically but also spiritually to past and present cultures. Karst is the most vulnerable terrain on Earth to environmental problems—changes in one area can literally cause the ground to fall out from beneath your feet in another.

Dr. George Veni is the Executive Director of the National Cave and Karst Research Institute (NCKRI) and an internationally recognized hydrogeologist specializing in caves and karst terrains. Prior to NCKRI, for more than 20 years he owned George Veni and Associates, a karst environmental consulting firm. He has conducted extensive karst research and explored caves throughout the United States and in many other countries for nearly 40 years. His explorations include river caves, ice caves, thermal caves, bat caves, beautiful crystalline caves, dangerously polluted caves, mazes, deep shafts, huge chambers, and cave archaeological sites. He is the Vice President of Administration for the International Union of Speleology. Three cave-dwelling species have been named in his honor. He has published and presented 210 papers, including four books, on hydrogeology, biology, and environmental management in karst terrains, and lectures internationally on the topics.

Date: 05/18/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

7th Explorers Club Film Festival



Opening Night

The 7th Explorers Club Film Festival opens with the beautifully restored "The Epic of Everest," the legendary 1924 film of George Mallory's fatal Everest expedition, introduced by Tim McHenry, Director of Public Programs and Performance for the Rubin Museum, who will stay for a Q&A after the film. The festival is also proud to feature on Opening Night the short film of Will Gadd's spectacular first ice climb of Niagara Falls just two months ago.


Saturday Morning

For the entire family -- students and children FREE - a celebration of "Born to Explore," former Club president Richard Wiese's hit television series for young explorers, which was nominated for five daytime Emmy Awards last month, including Outstanding Host, Outstanding Writing, Outstanding Music and Outstanding Travel Program.


Saturday Afternoon

The festival's afternoon program begins with the New York premiere of Steve Fisher's epic kayak expedition down the Congo River and first descent of the world's biggest rapids: "Congo: The Grand Inga Project." Fisher, a team member of the Lowell Thomas Award-winning first descent of the Tsangpo Gorge in 2002, will introduce the film. The second feature documentary is "Bidder 70," George and Beth Gage's multiple award-winning environmental film on Tim Christopher, the University of Utah student who attended a highly disputed federal oil and gas lease auction, bid on and bought land worth $1.7 million and effectively safeguarded 22,000 acres of pristine Utah land adjacent to Canyonlands National Park. Selected short films will be shown, including the just-released trailer of the Universal Pictures upcoming 3D feature, EVEREST, based on the 1996 tragedy chronicled in Jon Krakauer's best-seller "Into Thin Air."


Closing Night

The festival will close Saturday night with an exclusive Explorers Club Members-Only screening of George Butler and Caroline Alexander's eagerly anticipated documentary, "TIGER TIGER," which will take us into the ancient, threatened kingdom of the Royal Bengal Tiger of the Sundarbans at the southernmost edge of the Bengal Delta.


Tickets

Opening Night, Friday May 15: $50
All Day Saturday, May 16: $40
Saturday Morning: $20 adults, students, children free.
Saturday Afternoon: $30
Closing Night: Saturday, May 16: $50 (Club Members Only)
Festival pass: $125 (Club Members Only)

Click here to purchase tickets online

Alternatively, you can call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For information contact: Les Guthman and Bartle Bull, festival directors: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Epic of Everest (1924)



Ice Climbing Frozen Niagara Falls -
Will Gadd's First Ascent



Born to Explore with Richard Wiese



Congo: The Grand Inga Project



Bidder 70



TIGER, TIGER

Breezy Rehearsal Dinner_Trophy Dinner

7th Explorers Club Film Festival



Opening Night

The 7th Explorers Club Film Festival opens with the beautifully restored "The Epic of Everest," the legendary 1924 film of George Mallory's fatal Everest expedition, introduced by Tim McHenry, Director of Public Programs and Performance for the Rubin Museum, who will stay for a Q&A after the film. The festival is also proud to feature on Opening Night the short film of Will Gadd's spectacular first ice climb of Niagara Falls just two months ago.


Saturday Morning

For the entire family -- students and children FREE - a celebration of "Born to Explore," former Club president Richard Wiese's hit television series for young explorers, which was nominated for five daytime Emmy Awards last month, including Outstanding Host, Outstanding Writing, Outstanding Music and Outstanding Travel Program.


Saturday Afternoon

The festival's afternoon program begins with the New York premiere of Steve Fisher's epic kayak expedition down the Congo River and first descent of the world's biggest rapids: "Congo: The Grand Inga Project." Fisher, a team member of the Lowell Thomas Award-winning first descent of the Tsangpo Gorge in 2002, will introduce the film. The second feature documentary is "Bidder 70," George and Beth Gage's multiple award-winning environmental film on Tim Christopher, the University of Utah student who attended a highly disputed federal oil and gas lease auction, bid on and bought land worth $1.7 million and effectively safeguarded 22,000 acres of pristine Utah land adjacent to Canyonlands National Park. Selected short films will be shown, including the just-released trailer of the Universal Pictures upcoming 3D feature, EVEREST, based on the 1996 tragedy chronicled in Jon Krakauer's best-seller "Into Thin Air."


Closing Night

The festival will close Saturday night with an exclusive Explorers Club Members-Only screening of George Butler and Caroline Alexander's eagerly anticipated documentary, "TIGER TIGER," which will take us into the ancient, threatened kingdom of the Royal Bengal Tiger of the Sundarbans at the southernmost edge of the Bengal Delta.


Tickets

Opening Night, Friday May 15: $50
All Day Saturday, May 16: $40
Saturday Morning: $20 adults, students, children free.
Saturday Afternoon: $30
Closing Night: Saturday, May 16: $50 (Club Members Only)
Festival pass: $125 (Club Members Only)

Click here to purchase tickets online

Alternatively, you can call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

For information contact: Les Guthman and Bartle Bull, festival directors: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

The Epic of Everest (1924)



Ice Climbing Frozen Niagara Falls -
Will Gadd's First Ascent



Born to Explore with Richard Wiese



Congo: The Grand Inga Project



Bidder 70



TIGER, TIGER

Hold - Oksana Pidhoreckyj Fundraiser Event - 2nd FL - Evening

Hold - Oksana Pidhoreckyj Fundraiser Event - 2nd FL - Evening, per email chain from Will on 2/3

D HOLD President's Office & Roosevelt Room for PLUTOPALOOZA

D HOLD President's Office & Roosevelt Room for PLUTOPALOOZA

Date: 05-13-15

Pluto-Palooza - NASA's New Horizons Mission to Pluto

NASA’s NEW HORIZONS
The First-Ever Mission to the Pluto System and the Kuiper Belt

Wednesday May 13th, 2015 from 6:00 to 9:00 pm

Pluto-Palooza New York at The Explorers Club features Principal Investigator Dr. Alan Stern, leader of the mission team; Cathy Olkin, Deputy Project Scientist; Marc Buie, New Horizons Co-Investigator; and Tiffany Finley, who as a graduate student helped design, build and test the Student Dust Counter and is now a member of the Science Operations Team. Together they will present a dynamic and richly-illustrated overview of the mission and the men and women who make it possible, leaving time for interaction and one-on-one encounters.

The New Horizons mission will help us understand worlds at the edge of our solar system by making the first reconnaissance of the Pluto system and by venturing deeper into the distant, mysterious Kuiper Belt – a relic of solar system formation. New Horizons launched on Jan. 19, 2006; it swung past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February 2007, and began a six-month-long reconnaissance flyby study of Pluto and its moons in early 2015. Pluto closest approach occurs on July 14, 2015. If NASA approves an extended mission, the spacecraft could head farther into the Kuiper Belt to examine one or two of the ancient, icy mini-worlds in that vast region, at least a billion miles beyond Neptune’s orbit.




Sending a spacecraft on this long journey will help answer basic questions about the surface properties, geology, interior makeup and atmospheres on these bodies. The National Academy of Sciences ranked the exploration of the Kuiper Belt – including Pluto – as being of the highest priority for solar system research. New Horizons seeks to understand where Pluto and its moons “fit in” with the other objects in the solar system, such as the inner rocky or “terrestrial” planets (Earth, Mars, Venus and Mercury) and the outer gas giants (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune). Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, belong to a third category known as “ice dwarfs.” They have solid surfaces but, unlike the terrestrial planets, a significant portion of their mass is icy material.

Using Hubble Space Telescope images, New Horizons team members such as Principal Investigator Alan Stern (Southwest Research Institute, SwRI), Project Scientist Hal Weaver (Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory) and Co-Investigator Mark Showalter (SETI Institute) have discovered four previously unknown moons of Pluto: Nix, Hydra, Styx and Kerberos. And in the last few months before Close Approach the team will be on the lookout for possible new moons and even a ring system that may prove a threat to the spacecraft.

A close-up look at these worlds from the spacecraft promises to reveal an incredible story about the origins and outskirts of our solar system. New Horizons also will explore – for the first time – how ice dwarf planets like Pluto and Kuiper Belt bodies have evolved over time.

New Horizons is the fastest spacecraft ever launched, is traveling the farthest to reach its primary target, and is the first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. The United States has been the first nation to reach every planet from Mercury to Neptune with a space probe. If New Horizons is successful, it will allow the U.S. to complete the initial reconnaissance of the solar system.



Dr. Alan Stern is the New Horizons Principal Investigator, leading the mission team and serving as PI of two instruments aboard the craft: the Alice UV spectrometer and the Ralph Visible Imager/IR Spectrometer. A planetary scientist, space program executive, author and aerospace consultant whose clients include Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin, Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Naveen Jain’s Moon Express Google Lunar X-Prize team, Dr. Stern has a storied career in space exploration and commercial space flight. His academic focus is on studies of our solar system’s Kuiper belt and Oort cloud, comets, the satellites of the outer planets, the Pluto system and the search for evidence of solar systems around other stars, and he has over 25 years of experience developing space instruments. In 2007 and 2008, Dr. Stern served as NASA’s chief of all science missions, overseeing a record 10 major new flight projects and the implementation of NASA’s education and public outreach programs; in 2007, he was named to Time’s list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. Dr. Stern’s work has taken him from the South Pole to the upper atmosphere. Currently an Associate Vice President at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, CO, he is training to fly a series of suborbital space research missions with Virgin Galactic and XCOR Aerospace later this year and into 2016.

Cathy Olkin is a New Horizons Deputy Project Scientist and a member of the Pluto Encounter Planning team, and works in the Office of the Principal Investigator at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, CO. Cathy is a planetary scientist with interest in the icy worlds of the outer solar system. She’s deeply committed to education and outreach and has been a coach in FIRST Lego League robotics competitions, and mentors both undergraduates and younger students.

Marc Buie is a New Horizons Co-Investigator, currently working at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, CO. Pluto has been a major focus of Marc’s research since 1983, and he was a founding member of the so-called “Pluto Underground” that has been promoting America’s first mission to the 9th. planet, starting in 1989. More recently he discovered the Kuiper Belt Objects that New Horizons might fly on to after the Pluto encounter, if NASA approves an extended mission. He also has a project (tnorecon.net) that is enlisting students to help measure the sizes of many objects in the Kuiper Belt. Marc is also interested in protecting Earth from asteroids and is part of a team attempting the first privately funded deep-space survey mission (b612foundation.org). Says Marc, “I may be thin-blooded transplant from Louisiana but my imagination always runs away with me when thinking about the super cold and complex environment on Pluto.”

Tiffany Finley is a Principal Engineer in the Space Operations Department, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder CO. After studying at MIT as an undergraduate, she earned her MS degree in Aerospace Engineering Sciences at CU Boulder, and was a member of the team that designed, built and tested the “Venetia Burney Student Dust Counter” (VBSDC), currently the only student-built instrument on a major NASA mission. (Venetia Burney was the English schoolgirl who proposed the name “Pluto” when the planet was discovered in 1930.) Tiffany is now Manager of the “Tombaugh Science Operations Center” at SwRI, and a member of the sequencing team working with the LORRI camera that is taking long range images of the Pluto system for both scientific and navigation purposes. Tiffany also continues working with the Student Dust Counter.



Tickets for the evening are Free for Explorers Club Members and $20 for non-members.

The evening will begin with a cocktail reception at 6:00 pm, followed by the presentation at 7:00pm. The presentation will conclude with a Q&A session, with the New Horizons team fielding questions from those in attendance.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

You can learn more about the New Horizons Mission here.

Follow the team on twitter and get the latest updates on the spacecraft here!

For more information about Pluto-Palooza please contact:

Geoff Haines-Stiles or Erna Akuginow, 973.656.9403
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

NYC - Public Lecture Series feat. William Grassie


Our Common Story: An Introduction to Big History


Typically, science is taught as separate specializations, and history is divided into different time periods and geographic regions. Big History is unique in the integration of all these different specializations, periods, and regions into a single narrative account of the 13.8 billion-year history of our universe, the 4.5 billion-year evolution of our planet, the 6 million-year rise of our species, and the 10,000-year accelerating drama of human civilization. For the first time, humans now have a common story that transcends all of our ethnic, linguistic, religious, and ideological differences. The meaning of this new Big History, however, is an open question. This lecture is an introduction to Big History and an exploration of what it might mean for humanity in the Anthropocene, the new era in which human activity begins to dominate evolutionary and geological processes on the planet.


Photo courtesy of anthropocene.info

Our guide is William Grassie, a student of Big History for over twenty years. Grassie is an interdisciplinary scholar, academic entrepreneur, social activist, and accomplished author. During his school years, he hitchhiked some 30,000 kilometers throughout North America and Europe. He has worked as a newspaper boy, farm hand, house painter, dish washer, janitor, night watchman, caddy, caretaker of multiply handicapped children, apprentice in a ceramic studio, camp counselor, beekeeper, computer consultant, real estate manager, and general contractor, among other jobs. Billy received a B.A. in political science from Middlebury College, and then worked for ten years on nuclear disarmament, citizen diplomacy, community organizing, and sustainability issues in Washington, D.C, Jerusalem, Philadelphia, and West Berlin. He completed a Ph.D. in Religion from Temple University, where he wrote a dissertation entitled Reinventing Nature: Science Narratives as Myths for an Endangered Planet (1994). He has taught at Temple University, as well as at Swarthmore College, Pendle Hill, and the University of Pennsylvania. A recipient of academic awards and grants from the American Friends Service Committee, the Roothbert Fellowship, and the John Templeton Foundation, Billy served as a Senior Fulbright Fellow in the Department of Buddhist Studies at the University of Peradeniya in Kandy, Sri Lanka in 2007–2008. He was the founding director of the Metanexus Institute, which promotes scientifically rigorous and philosophically open-ended exploration of foundational questions. Metanexus has worked with partners at some 400 universities in 45 countries and publishes an online journal. He has authored The New Sciences of Religion: Exploring Spirituality from the Outside In and Bottom Up (2010) and a collection of essays, Politics by Other Means: Science and Religion in the 21st Century (2010). Billy enjoys many sports, including hiking, skiing, sailing, scuba, tennis, yoga, and dance.

For more information, visit grassie.net.

Photo courtesy of bighistoryproject.com

Date: 05/11/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or call us at 212.628.8383.

T-hold Lesley Goldberg

Hold - Milbry Polk Board Office Meeting on 3 1/2 - 1pm - 4pm

Around and Over with Erden Eruç

Erden Eruç is the leading ocean rower in the world today. He is the recipient of the 2013 Citation of Merit from The Explorers Club, and one of the 2013 Adventurers of the Year – “nine individuals changing the face of global adventure” selected by the Outside Magazine. He is already listed in the 2009, 2012 and 2014 Guinness books of World Records.

Among his records are:
•   The first to complete a solo circumnavigation of the world by human power
•   The first to row the three oceans: Atlantic, Pacific and Indian
•   The first to row across an ocean from southern hemisphere to northern
•   The longest distance rowed across the Atlantic Ocean
•   The most experienced ocean rower alive with a career total of 876 days
•   The longest career distance rowed on oceans by nearly 29,000 nautical miles
•   The longest nonstop time at sea for a solo ocean rower by 312 days

He is a long-time Seattle resident and founder of the Seattle based 501(c)(3) nonprofit Around-n-Over with a mission to educate and inspire children. Human powered journeys are the source of their dispatches from the field. To date, Around-n-Over has raised and applied over $100k toward educational projects.

Erden recently completed the first solo circumnavigation by human power which took 5 years and 11 days. What started as a simple idea in 1997, tracing his finger across a world map hanging on the wall while working in a software development lab, would become his quiet obsession. An unfortunate accident which claimed the life of Göran Kropp while rock climbing together in eastern Washington in September of 2002, finally put him in motion. “Life is short, get on with it” was the message.

IN MEMORIAM – Six Summits Project

In memory of Göran Kropp, Erden decided to reach the highest summit on different continents except Antarctica. He would do so by human power as had Göran in his 1996 bicycle trip to climb Everest. In 2003, Erden summited Mt. McKinley after bicycling to Alaska towing his climbing gear like Göran and walking the length of the Kahiltna Glacier. During his circumnavigation by human power, he summited Kosciuszko in 2010 and Kilimanjaro in 2011. Aconcagua, Elbrus and Everest remain on Erden’s list of priorities over the coming years.

A TIMELY PROJECT – Row for Peace

Erden is teaming up with Australian and British partners in May 2015 to take his rowboat from New York to Gallipoli in Turkey. This will commemorate the Centenary of Gallipoli Campaign. Multiple flags will be flown on the rowboat to honor shared sacrifices, to celebrate reconciliation and to emphasize value of peace. By the summer of 2016, this memorial project may be over unless further funding enables rowing the boat back to the USA. Each of these rows will establish historic firsts and break existing Guinness records, making them worthwhile endeavors.

For more information visit Around-n-Over.org.

Date: May 6th, 2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Presentation

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Reservation Notes: Reservations are allotted on a first-come first-serve basis. To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Member Tickets: Free

Guest Tickets: $20

Hold - Carrie Manfrino - Central Carribean Marine Institute Event - Luncheon

Hold - Carrie Manfrino - Central Carribean Marine Institute Event Luncheon

Hold - George Gowen Event - Clark Room - 6-8pm

Hi Kevin,

George Gowen would like to reserve the Clark Room on May 5 form 6-8 PM. He'll be in touch with NY Catering later but wants to make sure the room is booked.

Thanks,
Mimi

NYC - Public Lecture Series featuring Shannon Galpin


Mountain to Mountain -
A Journey Through Afghanistan



National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, Shannon Galpin has spent the past six years working and exploring Afghanistan by bike, motorcycle, horse, skis, and by foot. A full time activist and humanitarian Shannon has visited Afghanistan 19 times to work on projectswith local photographers, artists, athletes, and activists on a variety of projects to empower the voice of women and girls. Sparked by a desire to understand women’s rights in a country mostly portrayed by war, terrorism, poverty and oppression in the media. Shannon has recently published a memoir, Mountain to Mountain, about her experiences in Afghanistan, and her journey to becoming an activist.

An avid mountain biker in Colorado, she was the first woman to mountain bike in Afghanistan in 2009, a country that where cycling is taboo for women and girls. She continued to ride in various areas of the country and found the bike to be an incredible icebreaker for authentic conversations and cultural exchanges. Believing that the bicycle is a vehicle for social justice and a symbol of freedom, she now supports the first generation of women to ride as part of the Afghan National Women’s Cycling Team. The bike was integral part of the women’s suffrage movement in the United States and many other countries, and controversial because it allowed women independent mobility.

Shannon founded her non profit, Mountain2Mountain in 2006 with the vision of empowering women and girls in conflict zones. Her work across Afghanistan includes supporting education initiatives, working in the women’s prisons, supporting workshops for graffiti artists, creating computers labs, and the creation of a deaf school in Kabul. Her work is now soley focused on supporting the burgeoning cycling movement in Afghanistan.

She is producing a documentary film about these women, Afghan Cycles, to release in 2016. Her groundbreaking Streets of Afghanistan street art exhibition combined the work of Afghan and Western photographers in a life size pop up installation that was set up in the villages and public spaces around the country. A frequent TEDx speaker, Shannon’s overarching belief is in the power of voice and individual action to create change. Shannon has been featured in New York Times, BBC World, CNN, NBC Nightly News, MSNBC, ESPN, NPR, Outside Magazine, among others.

Shannon is the author of the photography book, Streets of Afghanistan, and her recently published memoir, Mountain to Mountain, both of which will be available for sale and signing after her lecture.

Date: 05/04/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hold - Ted Janulis - Clark Room - Afternoon

Hold - Ted Janulis, per Will Roseman request on 12/19

Hold - Clark Room for Frank Zitz Event

Hold - Clark Room for Frank Zitz Event, per Will request on 1/7

Saturday Science for Students with Dr. Betty Borowsky


From Jamaica Bay, New York, to Frasassi Caves, Italy: How I Learned That Animals Without Eyes Can Detect Light


Dr. Betty Borowsky earned her Ph.D. in Physiological Ecology of Marine Invertebrates at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She was awarded a Jesse Smith Noyes Post-Doctoral Fellowship to continue her studies at the New York Aquarium. After that, she joined the Nassau County Health Department as the Director of Planning and Data Management, then joined Nassau Community College, where she is Associate Professor of Biology. Dr. Borowsky is very active in environmental education activities in Nassau County. She is currently the President of the South Shore Audubon Society, and a member of the Boards of the Friends of Tackapausha Preserve, the Friends of Hempstead Plains, and the Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audubon Center in Oyster Bay.

Breakfast will be served before the lecture.

Date: 05-02-15

Time: 10am-12pm

Location: The Explorers Club (Trophy Room), 46 E. 70th Street, New York, NY 10021

Member Ticket price: FREE

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price:

FREE with a valid (academic) student ID

Reservation Notes:

Seats are secured on a first come, first served basis. For reservations, please contact 212.628.8383; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

D HOLD Map Room for Veron Taylor, Noon-4pm

Meeting w/ 2 people

Date: 05-14-15

Time: 12pm - 4pm

A Gala Dinner with Description de l'Égypte Benefiting The Explorers Club Library & Archives


April 30th, 6:00 - 9:30 pm


The Explorers Club invites you to a very special evening celebrating the French explorers who studied and documented Egypt under Napoleon’s orders (1798-1801).

These scholar-explorers included over one thousand scientists, engineers, architects and artists, whose research and documentation of Egypt culminated in the creation and publication of the Description de l'Égypte (1809-1828). The Explorers Club owns a fine edition of these legendary volumes.

From 6 o’clock to 7 o’clock, small groups will have the opportunity for a guided viewing of these volumes while others savor historic French and Egyptian cuisine. A celebration – with a full bar & special drinks – will be held in the library.

At 7 o’clock, a dinner – evoking the exotic flavors & aromas of the period – will be served in the Clark Room, where the Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale University, Dr. Paul Freedman, will discuss the cuisine and the enduring significance the French occupation of Egypt has had on the history of gastronomy.

At 8 o’clock, following the dinner, the Curator of the Dahesh Museum, Alia Nour, will give an illustrated talk discussing specific men and their scientific efforts, the establishment of the Commission des Sciences et Arts d'Égypte. She will demonstrate the importance of these scientific and cultural discoveries and will show their influence on art and science .

The Explorers Club Archivist and Curator of Research Collections, Lacey Flint, will give a ten minute history of the club’s flag expeditions into Egypt and will present some of the club’s holdings.

We will toast The Explorers Club Library & Archives holdings and conclude the evening by 9:30 pm.

Tickets for this special event are available for purchase by Club Members at $150 per person and by the public at $175 per person. For reservations, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Payment is required with reservations, no tickets will be sold at the door, and there will be no cancellations after Friday, April 24th at 12:00 pm. Please indicate if you would like to arrive by 5:45 pm to be part of the first group to view the Description de l'Égypte. Additional contributions are most welcome.

Hold - Clark Room - The Royal Oak Foundation

Hold - Clark Room - The Royal Oak Foundation, per Will Roseman request on 12/16

Hold - Ralph Lauren - Library & Trophy Room - Daytime

Hold - Ralph Lauren - Library & Trophy Room - Daytime, per Will request on 4/17

NYC - Public Lecture Series featuring Charles W. Johnson


ICE SHIP: The Epic Voyages of the Polar Adventurer Fram

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

Over the history of polar exploration in its golden (or heroic) age, 1800s to early 1900s, many an expedition set out to answer the big question — was the Arctic an open ocean beyond a barrier of ice, a continent, or an ocean covered with ice? Many had theories, but no one knew for sure, as the ice had kept its secret well; ships trying to penetrate it all failed, often catastrophically, including the USS Jeannette (the subject of Hampton Sides’ new book) whose far-flung wreckage show up in southern Greenland and convinced Norway’s charismatic scientist-explorer Fridtjof Nansen that it was indeed an ocean covered with drifting ice. Nansen intended to prove this in a novel if mortally risky way: build a special ship capable of withstanding the ice, join it, then drift wherever it took them, on an inescapable, one-way journey over the pole and into discovery and fame…or oblivion.

Ice Ship is the story of that vessel, the Fram, from initial conception to final resting-place as a museum in Oslo, including three epic adventures: a three-year, ice-bound drift, finding out what the Arctic really was; a four-year exploration of 200,000 square miles of unmapped lands in the vast Canadian Arctic; two years to Antarctica (taking Roald Amundsen for his eventual claiming of the South Pole) and exploring the Southern Ocean. It is also the story of the extraordinary men who took the ship on these journeys and explorations, covering 84,000 miles in over 20 years.

The lecture is a lively, pictorial cruise through the book, using original images from the era and all three expeditions.

Charles W. Johnson is the former Vermont State Naturalist, a 20-year veteran of the U.S. Coast Guard, and author of several popular books on natural history, including The Nature of Vermont: Introduction and Guide to a New England Environment, Bogs of the Northeast, and In Season: A Natural History of the New England Year. He has a BA from Wabash College, MS from the University of Illinois, and Ph.D. from the University of Vermont. He has a lifelong interest in polar regions and exploration. He lives in East Montpelier, Vermont.

Date: 4/27/2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Steven Burton_Clark Room

Chicago / Great Lakes Chapter Event



Paul Sereno will regale the Chicago/Great Lakes Chapter with amazing stories of exploration and adventure. Sereno, professor of paleontology at the University of Chicago and a National Geographic "explorer-in-residence," has discovered several new dinosaur species on several continents, including at sites in Inner Mongolia, Argentina, Morocco and Niger. His most widely publicized discovery is that of a nearly complete specimen of Sarcosuchus imperator — popularly known as SuperCroc — at Gadoufaoua in the Tenere desert of Niger.

Date: Saturday, April 25th, 2015

Time: 7:00 PM cocktail reception, 8:00 PM lecture

Location: University Club of Chicago, 76 E Monroe St, Chicago, IL 60603

Tickets: $50 per person, payable at the door

Attire: Informally posh or native dress

Reservations: RSVP to Lisa Salay at 269.501.2636 or .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). We must receive your RSVP by April 17, the sooner the better.

Click here for directions, valet parking (fee) or self-park.

D-Hold - Empowers Africa - Nikki Wiese Young

NYC - Film Screening - Common Ground

COMMON GROUND (2012)

Director & Producer: Phillip Buccellato.
Associate Producer: Jesse Ash.
We will be joined by the Director and Associate Producer as well as by Ravi Corea, founder president of the Sri Lanka Wildlife Conservation Society for a Q&A after the film.

The Explorers Club cordially invites you to a special New York screening of Common Ground, a documentary film on the conflict between humans and elephants for land. This conflict has further intensified with the ending of the nearly 33 year long civil war in Sri Lanka. This is mainly due to war displaced people moving back into areas that had been abandoned for 33 years and had reverted to jungle and become elephant habitat.

For thousands of years, across Asia, humans and elephants have lived side by side in a relatively peaceful coexistence. That relationship is now being threatened due to increasing human populations and loss of elephant habitats. Elephants and humans are being forced to compete for resources, a problem that has been defined as Human-Elephant-Conflict. This predicament poses a serious threat to the elephant's continued existence. While this is a widespread concern all across Asia and Africa, it is nowhere more apparent than in the small island of Sri Lanka.

There are less than 5,000 Asian elephants left in Sri Lanka and they are listed by the IUCN as 'Endangered' and by CITES as a species threatened with extinction. The main threats they face in Sri Lanka are habitat loss due to clearing of forest for subsistence agriculture and mega development projects, poaching for ivory, illegal capture and retribution killing for raiding crops.

Common Ground, which was selected for six international film festivals, provides an insightful overview of the intense human-elephant conflicts in Sri Lanka. The film also shows some of the international and national award winning measures the Sri Lanka Wildlife Conservation Society had developed and implemented over the years to mitigate human elephant conflicts.



Running Time: 53 Minutes

Date: Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Screening

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC student members, $5 w/ a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

NYC - Public Lecture Series feat. Patricia Glyn


Dawid’s Return

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.


Patricia Glyn made her name as a broadcaster on South African radio and TV and, after 13 years of live shows decided to make a living out of her hobby: adventures.

She walked 500 kilometres through Zimbabwe at a rate of 50 kilometres per day during the height of Robert Mugabe’s land invasions and their resulting social chaos. A year later, she spent three months on Mount Everest, reporting on the Discovery team’s efforts to stand on top of the world. Her daily journal describing life on this great mountain was later published as a popular book called Off Peak.

Her next adventure was a 2 000 kilometre walk from Durban to the Victoria Falls in the footsteps of her ancestor, Sir Richard Glyn, who got to the Falls soon after David Livingstone. The two thousand kilometre journey took her along the old hunter/trader routes to the interior of Africa, often off-road and often in Big Five territory. Footing with Sir Richard’s Ghost is the book Patricia wrote about this odyssey and it is a best-seller in South Africa.

In 2011 Patricia set off for the Kalahari, to find traces of a long-dead Bushman by the name of Makai Kruiper – a legendary mystic, hunter and healer who roamed ‘The Thirst Land’ a century ago. And by her side was Makai’s grandson, Dawid, a man as legendary as his forebear. In a deeply moving and poignant trek, the Kruiper family (spanning three generations) and Patricia’s team visited and documented mystical and sacred places; battle and hunting grounds; birth, death and burial sites. In her presentation about this odyssey, she talks about the fragments that remain in the Kalahari sand of a long-gone life; the secrets that have been handed down from son to son, and the extraordinary memory and tracking skills that helped the Kruipers find Makai’s artifacts, some 60 years after they’d been buried.

This is also a story about just how much the Bushmen can teach us about respect for our natural resources and how to preserve them. Patricia demonstrates how the ‘old’ Bushman attitudes hold the key to our environmental future. She shows how little they consume, how much they value their natural heritage and how much they leave in place for their children’s children. But it’s also an amusing talk about a journey with a group of irreverent storytellers, free spirits, hilarious mimics and loving people.

Once again, Patricia and her professional team of photographers and filmmakers have brought back thousands of photos and hours of footage, the best of which have been selected to illustrate her talk about this grand adventure. Her book about the journey is called What Dawid Knew and will be on sale after the talk.

Date: April 20th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a place, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

World Underwater Conference Rolex

T-Hold Patrick Lynch Futaleufu Riverkeeper

NYC - Film Screening - Coral City

CORAL CITY (2015)

Director/ Editor/ Producer: John McSwain.
Director of Photography: Jake Burghart.
The Director, members of the film crew and Colin Foord from Coral Morphologic will be present at the Screening

The Explorers Club, The Creators Project and VICE cordially invites you to the New York premiere screening of Coral City. A film that documents the extraordinary world of corals that live in the Center of one of America's busiest Cities. It is one of the few places in the country where living reefs can be found only a few feet from stoplights. Miami is one of only a handful of major cities where coral can be found growing inside the city limits and it is the only city in the continental US with an urban coral ecosystem where you can step into the water just off of a city street and find an entire living ecosystem thriving just under the surface.

This documentary takes an exclusive look at the process behind Coral Morphologic's living artworks, colorful reefs created using coral polyps native to Miami. Watch as the scientific art collective explores the visual storytelling potential of coral reef organisms through film, multimedia and site-specific artworks. Additionally, learn how rising sea levels, combined with government dredging projects, are impacting not only corals, but the entire fate of Miami."



Running Time: 37 Minutes

Date: Tuesday, April14th, 2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Screening

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC student members, $5 w/ a valid student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

NYC - Public Lecture Series featuring Michael Jaye


Resolving the Problem of Atlantis

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

This talk begins by exposing a fundamental error in geology: for nearly 200 years geologists have accepted that the Earth has had all of its water since nearly its beginning. This belief follows from a debate among members of the Geological Society of London who observed that diluvial gravels belonged to multiple, distinct events; thus, there was not a single worldwide flood. But the Society’s conclusion assumed that the present amount of water has been with the Earth since its beginning thereby precluding the possibility that now-submerged landscapes might have been inundated by some unknown event. From the evidence the precise conclusion should have been: presently exposed landscapes were not inundated by a presumed worldwide flood. An unfortunate consequence is that nearly all of subsequent geology has been fit to an incorrect paradigm.

Relatively new map data expose the error. For instance, Monterey Canyon off the coast of California is perhaps the most studied of the submarine canyons common to continental margins worldwide. These submerged features are assumed to transport sediments to abyssal plains via subsurface processes such as gravity flows or turbidity currents. These flows are rarely observed mainly for two reasons: the “difficulty in making measurements and observations on active or abandoned channels, and the probably long time scale, on the order of thousands of years, needed to develop these structures, that forbids the observation of processes on a human time scale” (Metivier, 2005). As a consequence, the mechanism is inferred from laboratory or numerical experiments. However, the lack of certainty that experimental inferences scale to geographic features leaves the creation mechanism unresolved.

At its essence, complete understanding of the submerged features’ creation mechanism has not been attained due to two assumptions: (1) when investigations into the structures began, the full extent of the systems was unknown – they were assumed to be found only near continental shelves where gravitational gradients might support turbidity currents; (2) the Geological Society of London’s incorrect assumption that the Earth has had its present amount of water since nearly its beginning. A consequence of (1) is that a body of published works was built upon it, and a consequence of (2) is that it has prevented the problem’s resolution.

We resolve matters by recognizing that these are subaerially carved drainages and then by identifying the source of such a volume of water as to cover the former abyss in more than three kilometers of water. This cosmic impact occurred approximately 13,000 years before present, and it caused “the extraordinary inundation” of the planet (Plato) as well as the nano-daimond layer associated with the Younger-Dryas event that recently made the news. Waters introduced by this impact submerged and preserved in the bathymetry the city of Atlantis as well as Monterey Canyon, and they also connected formerly disjoint seas and oceans.

We will visit map images of the Atlantis canal system and note its similarity to Plato’s description, and we will discuss how a (pre-impact) warming Earth climate caused Atlanteans to modify the city’s drainage structure. We will also discuss other pre- and post-impact effects.

The result is a new paradigm that affords a better understanding of Earth and human history.

Michael Jaye is an associate professor at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. An applied mathematician, Jaye has published in a variety of disciplines including underwater sound propagation, agent-based models of human behavior, the growth and decay of the cryosphere, and geology. Jaye’s interest in geology began with satellite map imagery of the Monterey Canyon drainage system, and his subsequent investigations led to a recent presentation at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Vancouver. His primary research focus is now directed toward reconciling geology, archaeology, and anthropology.

Date: 04/13/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

D/HOLD: Saturday Science for Students w/ Dr. Anthony Tolvo (Topic TBD)

D/HOLD: Saturday Science for Students w/ Dr. Anthony Tolvo (Topic TBD)

Date: 4/11/2015

Saturday Science for Students w/ Dr. Anthony Tolvo

Can we retro-engineer a dinosaur? Find out the possibilities with Molloy College's Dr. Anthony Tolvo (Dean of Natural Science, Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Studies).

Breakfast will be served before the lecture.

Date: 04-11-15

Time: 10am-12pm

Location: The Explorers Club (Trophy Room), 46 E. 70th Street, New York, NY 10021

Member Ticket price: FREE

Guest Ticket Price: $10

Student Ticket Price:

FREE with a valid (academic) student ID

Reservation Notes:

Seats are secured on a first come, first served basis.

For reservations, please contact 212.628.8383; .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Carter Bales_North Shore_Second Floor

NYC - Public Lecture Series feat. Caitlin O'Connell


ELEPHANT DON: The Politics of a Pachyderm Posse

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

Meet Greg. He’s a stocky guy with an outsized swagger. He’s been the intimidating, yet sociable don of his posse of friends—including Abe, Keith, Mike, Kevin, and Freddie Fredericks—but one arid summer the tide begins to shift and the third-ranking Kevin starts to get ambitious and seeks a higher position within this social club. But this is no ordinary tale of gangland betrayal—Greg and his entourage are bull elephants in Etosha National Park, Namibia, where, for the last twenty years, Caitlin O’Connell has been a keen observer of their complicated friendships.

In Elephant Don, O’Connell, one of the leading experts on elephant communication and social behavior, takes us inside the little-known world of African male elephants, a world that is steeped in ritual, where bonds are maintained by unexpected tenderness punctuated by violence. Elephant Don tracks Greg and his group of bulls as O’Connell tries to understand the vicissitudes of male friendship, power struggles, and play. A frequently heart-wrenching portrayal of commitment, loyalty, and affection between individuals yearning for companionship, it vividly captures the incredible repertoire of elephant behavior and communication. Greg, O’Connell shows, is sometimes a tyrant and other times a benevolent dictator as he attempts to hold on to his position at the top. Though Elephant Don is Greg’s story, it is also the story of O’Connell and the challenges and triumphs of field research in environs more hospitable to lions and snakes than scientists.

Readers will be drawn into dramatic tales of an elephant society at once exotic and surprisingly familiar, as O’Connell’s decades of close research reveal extraordinary discoveries about a male society not wholly unlike our own. Surely we’ve all known a Greg or two, and through this book we may come to know them in a whole new light.

Dr. Caitlin O'Connell is a Consulting Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine and a world renowned expert on elephants and vibrotactile sensitivity. She is the author of the internationally acclaimed nonfiction science memoir, The Elephant's Secret Sense (2007, Free Press), which highlights a novel form of elephant communication as well as their conservation plight. Her narrative nonfiction photo book An Elephant's Life (2011, Lyons Press) uses a graphic novel approach to revealing subtle and intimate aspects of elephant society. Her co-authored nonfiction children's book, The Elephant Scientist (2011, Houghton Mifflin Children's Books) won five awards, including the Robert F. Sibert Honor and Horn Book Honor for 2012. A Baby Elephant In The Wild (2014, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Books for Young Readers) is a Junior Library Guild Select, and Elephant Don: The Politics Of A Pachyderm Posse (University of Chicago Press) comes out April 6, 2015.

Her debut novel, Ivory Ghosts, comes out with Random House, March 2015. O'Connell is the co-founder and CEO of the nonprofit organization, Utopia Scientific, dedicated to research and science education. She is also co-director of Triple Helix Productions, with a mandate to develop more accurate science content for the media. She has written five screenplays with science themes and has just finished her first co-authored novel to inspire girls with an interest in physics. She has taught Science Writing for Stanford University and The New York Times Knowledge Network.

You can learn more about Caitlin at her author website caitlineoconnell.com, her elephant blog, and be sure to watch an award-winning documentary about her research on the Smithsonian Channel.

Date: 4/6/2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a place, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Club Closed - Good Friday & Passover

The Explorers Club will be closed today, Friday April 3rd, for Good Friday and the beginning of Passover. We will resume regular operating hours on Monday, April 6th at 9:00am. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Date: Friday, April 3rd

NYC - Public Lecture Series feat. Sas Carey


Exploring the Changing Nomadic Life: Earth, Spirit, and Medicine

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.


We are all descendants of nomads. Seventy years ago, the whole population of Mongolia was still considered nomadic. By the nineties, when Sas Carey first went to Mongolia, half of the people were nomads. Now, according to the World Bank, nomads make up only a quarter of the population. Among those is a small ethnic group of Dukha (Tuvan) people in northern Mongolia who are committed to living the life of their ancestors—herding reindeer. Central to their lives are the land, the animals, and their community.

Although Dukha families live in a Siberian tipis or urts, they welcome modern inventions that make their lives easier. For instance, they get power from solar panels, store it in batteries in their urts, and use it to watch television. And while they cut wood with a chainsaw, they pile the wood on their reindeer to take it from the forest. When they migrate each season from one camp to another to vary and improve the grazing pasture for the herd, they ride on reindeer and pack their goods, babies, and satellite dish on a reindeer for transportation.

The Dukha’s summer camp is an eight-hour ride by horse and reindeer from the closest county center and the winter area has temperatures that dip to -20 degrees Fahrenheit. The Dukha have a relationship with the land, plants, and shamans so that they and their animals stay healthy in this extreme environment. They know which plant will help heal their lungs, what tincture will prevent a ruptured appendix, and when to ask for help from shamans and their unseen world.

Along with slides, this lecture will include clips from two new documentaries. The first, CEREMONY, gives rare access to a shaman ceremony and the shamans’ explanations of what is happening. The second is a clip from MIGRATION, showing a Dukha family as they moved from the spring camp to the summer camp in June 2014. As we experience the changing life of modern day nomads, we get a taste of the long forgotten past of our own ancestors.

A nurse, energy healer, and educator turned writer and documentary filmmaker, Sas Carey’s work for the past two decades has flowed from Mongolian nomads’ changing needs. Starting with her life's mission to harmonize traditional and modern medicine, she began by researching traditional Mongolian medicine. Then, after working as a short term United Nations Development Programme health educator, she was inspired to interview nomadic women in the Gobi about their sustainable life. This became the movie, Gobi Women’s Song. Invited to research and teach the Dukhas about health, she collected a seven-year Dukha health database. Later her non-profit Nomadicare set up training for doctors from 38 rural clinics in Mongolia to study traditional Mongolian medicine and modern laboratory techniques. Today, she finds the focus of her work is to support the nomadic ways of the Dukhas and in return, they invite her to document, as Nomadicare’s mission says, their current “lifeways, lore, and songs”. She is also the author of Reindeer Herders in My Heart, published in both Mongolian and English.

Date: 03/30/2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Hold - Lee Elman - Clark Room

Hold - Lee Elman - Clark Room, per Roseman request on 1/12

Hold - Clark Foundation Event - 2nd FL - Evening

Hold - Clark Foundation Event - 2nd FL - Evening, per Mimi request on 2/5

Hold - ECAD Monday

NYC - Public Lecture Series featuring Doug Allan

Life Behind the Lens

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.


Did you ever wonder just how you would film a mother polar bear emerging from her den for the very first time with her cubs? Or dive under the Arctic sea ice to study feeding Eider ducks? Or spend 30 years tracking down killer whales to discover how they hunt seals on ice floes? Do you need the very latest technology, specially modified to keep working in the bitterly cold temperatures? Should you be some kind of superman, or just plain lucky?

Life Behind the Lens answers those questions. Often exciting, sometimes humorous, always revealing and refreshingly honest, this talk by Doug Allan offers unique personal insights into the trials and tribulations of filming animals in the wildest places on Earth. Doug’s enthusiasm for communicating his deep understanding of the biology of the animals and the psychology of film-makers make this presentation both engaging and inspirational. It’s suitable for a wide range of ages and audiences, from youngsters to adults, from scientists to artists.



Doug Allan spent seven years in Antarctica as a research diver, scientist and photographer for the British Antarctic Survey, before changing direction to full time filming in 1983. Since then he has become one of the world’s best known and respected cameramen. He specializes in natural history, expeditions and science documentaries in some of the wildest and most remote places on our planet, particularly the polar zones. In his 30 year filming career, he's worked for BBC, Discovery, National Geographic and many others, filming for series like The Blue Planet, Planet Earth, Frozen Planet and Ocean Giants.

His film-making has earned him many awards, including 7 Emmys, 4 BAFTAs, 3 Honorary Doctorates by UK universities, and an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society. He is the recipient of the Fuchs Medal and two Polar Medals, and is a Fellow of The Explorers Club.

Date: 3/23/2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

To secure a place, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

Public Lecture Series featuring Laurence Brahm

Laurence Brahm, author of Fusion Economics: How Pragmatism is Changing the World will speak about his experiences traveling through Asia – specifically Bhutan, Tibet and China – and Africa working to bring economic prosperity to communities in those regions.

Laurence will weave in his experience as a world-class economist, working with the Chinese government to create a national green growth policy, and crafting trade agreements between major western corporations and the Chinese government in the 1990s.

During the 1990s Brahm served as a policy strategist to China’s government. An insider in China’s halls of power, Brahm advised on reform and worked alongside Zhu Rongji, the charismatic and reformist premier. Brahm was a central figure in Asian countries undergoing the transformation from socialism to market, advising the central banks of Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia and the prime minister’s office of Mongolia. He presented them an alternative to the approach used by the World Bank and IMF. The results speak for themselves.

Brahm later became a celebrity investment advisor negotiating entry into China for many multinational corporations. He cut the very first China deals for Kodak, Exxon Mobil, Bayer, Ericsson, Benckiser, Roche, Chubb Insurance and Swiss Re-Insurance, to name a few.

After mediating the largest historic US-China technology transfer dispute in 1992, Brahm became known as a mediator, leading to a number of independent diplomacy missions including discussions between Beijing officials and the Dalai Lama, opening the Beijing-Taipei direct air route and liaising with Maoist rebels during the Nepalese peace process.

He currently divides his time between Beijing, helping to draft China’s first comprehensive green growth national policy, and Dar Es Salaam as chairman of the African Consensus Forum. He is married with two children.

He is the author of more than a dozen books including the bestseller Zhu Rongji: The Transformation of Modern China (Wiley, 2001) and The Anti-Globalization Breakfast Club (2009).

Date: March 23rd, 2015

Time: 6:00pm Reception, 7:00pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ a valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Exploring Legends with Alexandra Shackleton

The Hon. Alexandra Shackleton succeeded her father, Lord Shackleton KG OBE PC (1911-1994), younger son of the explorer, as president of the James Caird Society. The registered charity is the only institution that exists to preserve the memory, honor the remarkable feats of discovery in the Antarctic and commend the outstanding qualities of leadership associated with the name Sir Ernest Shackleton, KCVO (l874-l922).

Based in London, Ms. Shackleton has been instrumental in furthering Shackleton historic research, contributed forewords to books on Antarctic exploration and consulted on several films and TV series including Channel Four/First Sight Films television drama Shackleton starring Kenneth Branagh, and the Discovery Channel series Shackleton: Death or Glory starring Tim Jarvis. She also has had the honor of christening three ships: the Royal Navy's Ice Patrol ship, HMS Endurance; the trawler Lord Shackleton; and the British Antarctic Survey ship, RRS Ernest Shackleton.

Jim Clash FR '99 will ask Ms. Shackleton about all of this and more, then at the end of the interview, open the floor to audience questions.

Date: Monday, March 23rd, 2015

Time: 3:30pm

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free to EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-served basis.

To secure a reservation, please call us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Annual Dinner Sunday


Sunday, March 22nd

ECAD Sunday will start in the morning at 9:00am, with the customary Annual Meeting of the Membership. This portion of the day is open only to Members of the Club. At Noon, the Club will be open to guests who joined us for the previous evening's festivities, with lunch served for all in attendance. The Clubhouse will not be open to the general public. After lunch, we will begin the afternoon programs from a wide variety of explorers.

1:20 PM   John Geiger

Polar Exploration

The greatest mystery in all polar exploration is the fate of the 1845–1848 British Arctic Expedition commanded by Sir John Franklin. All 129 crewmen died, and the two ships seemingly vanished without a trace. The expedition's destruction was a mass disaster spread over two years, with lead poisoning, scurvy and, ultimately, cannibalism. The mystery persisted for 17 decades, until last fall’s discovery of Franklin’s ship, HMS Erebus.

1:40 PM   Amber Jackson & Emily Callahan

Artificial Reefs

Found all over the world's oceans, offshore oil and gas platforms boast immense and colorful reefs. Graduates from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson took on the adventure of exploring these platforms off of California and the diversity of marine life thriving there. Converting oil platforms into artificial reefs provides a silver lining to the realities of offshore oil and gas development by offering an alternative to complete rig removal.

2:00 PM   Julian Fisher

Anthropology in Africa

In the mid 19th century European explorers encountered culturally rich African tribal kingdoms. Their impact upon those kingdoms was profound. Between 2007 and 2015 Anthropologist Julian Monroe Fisher has conducted six EC flag expeditions researching what the Victorian age explorers said about those kingdoms in the 19th century and the 21st century realities of central African kingdoms. Most recently he has focused upon the Mundari pastoral herdsmen of South Sudan and the Karamojong/Karimojong pastoral herdsmen of northeastern Uganda.

2:20 PM   Cameron Batchelor

Mass extinction events

Scientists from the International Geoscience Programme Project 596 study climate change and biodiversity patterns in deep time. In August 2014, the team (including Dr. Sarah Carmichael, Dr. Johnny Waters, and Cameron Batchelor of Appalachian State University) conducted fieldwork western Mongolia using a range of geologic techniques - from geochemistry to stratigraphy to paleontology to radiometric age dating - in order to better understand Late Devonian mass extinction events.


2:40 PM TO 3:40 PM   Break



3:40 PM   Jut Wynne

Unique Easter Island biology

A relict assemblage of endemic invertebrates, new to science, has been discovered in Easter Island (Rapa Nui) caves. Despite the island-wide loss of most native ecosystems, these animals persist and are considered “disturbance relicts” — organisms whose distributions are now limited to areas that experienced minimal human disturbance historically. This discovery represents exciting conservation opportunities for protecting these imperiled animal populations.

4:00 PM   Denise Herzing

Dolphin Communication

We will explore the life of three generations of dolphins growing up in the wild and the many ways they communicate using sound, postures and vision. This resident community has been studied for 30 years in the same location in the Bahamas. Recent changes in the environment have caused a major distribution shift of these resident dolphins, creating new challenges to life in the wild.

4:20 PM   Susan Eaton

Snorkeling census of northern water biology

In July 2014, a ten-woman team of ocean explorers, scientists, divers, movie makers and journalists from four countries mounted a successful proof-of-concept snorkel expedition from northern Labrador to western Greenland. The expedition involved long-distance snorkel relays—using diver propulsion vehicles—in pack ice and in the 9,000-foot-deep waters of the Davis Strait. Team Sedna conducted marine mammal and sea bird censuses and delivered an ocean educational program

4:40 PM   Mary Ann Bruni

Filmmaker

Filmmaker Mary Ann Bruni has visited Kurdistan regularly since 1991. Her documentary Quest for Honor “To promote peace and understanding through exploration and documentation.” premiered at 2009 Sundance Film Festival, was short-listed for the 2010 Oscars, and won the 2010 Van Gogh Grand Jury Award at Amsterdam Film Festival. For her Spanish Texas work Bruni holds a lazo de dama award from the Order of Isabel la Catolica, awarded by Juan Carlos, King of Spain. Today we share the back story of her coming Kurdistan film.


5:00 PM   Pastries, Prosecco, and More Surprises

Hold - ECAD Sunday - Clubhouse Madness

Hold - ECAD Sunday - Clubhouse Madness

The 111th Explorers Club Annual Dinner at the American Museum of Natural History


The Spirit of Exploration

From Dinosaurs to the Stars

The 111th Explorers Club Annual Dinner is fast approaching! We believe that this annual gathering will be the most exciting in our organization’s history; and we hope you've planned to join us March 20-22, 2015, in New York City.

The Dinner itself on Saturday evening, March 21, 2015 is now sold out! It has been several decades since this event sold out nearly a month in advance, and we truly appreciate this extraordinary support from our membership.

For members who were not able to make an ECAD reservation at the American Museum of Natural History, please consider joining us for the Friday night cocktail reception aboard the carrier Intrepid, or the after party on Saturday night at AMNH.

Saturday Evening

March 21st, 2015

In the historic venue of the American Museum of Natural History, you’ll enjoy cocktails and exotics in the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda, named for one of our most famous members, and the Akeley Hall of African Mammals, named for the Club’s second president. An elegant dinner will follow in the beautiful Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, under the giant blue whale that is suspended from its towering ceiling.



6:00 - VIP Reception, Akeley Hall of African Mammals
6:30 - General Reception, Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda
7:30 - Annual Dinner, Milstein Hall of Ocean Life
10:00 - After Party and Surprises

Join a distinguished assemblage of guests, including astronauts like Honorary Chair John Glenn and Buzz Aldrin, ocean explorers like Bob Ballard, Sylvia Earle, Jim Cameron and Honorary President Don Walsh, mountaineers, polar explorers, international leaders, journalists, military heroes, and royalty. We will witness a dramatic Explorers Club Flag return by Honorary Director Frederik Paulsen, hear remarks by the Honorable Alexandra Shackleton on the 100th anniversary of her grandfather’s famous expedition, and salute our Club’s outstanding Medalists of 2015.



The Explorers Club Medal

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ph.D.
A prominent astrophysicist, cosmologist, and the director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History, deGrasse Tyson has been a leading advocate for science education for more than a decade, hosting NOVA Science Now and most recently Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey on Fox Network.


The Finn Ronne Memorial Award

David K. Hempleman-Adams, LVO, OBE, MED ‘00
British explorer awarded the Polar Medal by the Queen and first person to reach both Geographical Poles as well as climb the Seven Summits. He has visited the Arctic regions for science and adventure for 40 years.


Citation of Merit

Mandip Singh Soin, MI ‘92
A prominent mountaineer, versatile adventurer, eco pacifist and explorer, Founder President of the Ecotourism Society of India with exploration expeditions on six continents over four decades.


C. William Steele, FE ‘79
Legendary cave explorer in the deepest and longest caves of the Americas. Currently leader of the project exploring and studying the deepest cave in the Western Hemisphere, Sistema Huautla.


Edward C. Sweeney Memorial Medal

Bruce Blanchard, MN ‘78
Indefatigable officer of the Explorers Club Washington Group since 1995, for his significant contributions to the financial well-being of the Club and facilitation of its student exploration grant program.


Friday Evening - March 20th, 2015


Cocktail Reception Onboard the Intrepid
7:00pm on Pier 86, West 46th Street & 12th Avenue

Our ECAD weekend starts on Friday as we welcome all table and ticket holders for Saturday’s Annual Dinner at a Cocktail Reception on the legendary aircraft carrier Intrepid. We’ll explore Hangar 3 during the reception, and pay special tribute to Team Rubicon, military veterans who work with "first responders" to rush aid to natural disasters around the world. We’ve moved our unique Silent Auction to Friday night, with everything from art and artifacts to books signed by explorers and private dinners hosted by Explorers Club Medalists. Come connect with old friends, meet new ones, bid on fabulous items, and most important, honor some very courageous men and women who exemplify the “Spirit of Exploration”. This event is automatically open to all ECAD ticket buyers of every level, with no reservations required. Standalone tickets are also available for $150. To purchase, contact us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Saturday Night - March 21st, 2015

ECAD After Party at AMNH
10:00 pm - Midnight

Join after-dinner revelers in the Theodore Roosevelt Rotunda and Akeley Hall of African Mammals at the American Museum of Natural History, for an open bar, dessert bites, and the chance to mingle with the 2015 Medalists and fellow members. Black Tie or Exploration Attire. Standalone tickets are available for $100. To purchase, contact us at 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Friday / Saturday / Sunday Events


Friday, March 20th
10:00 AM
Private Tour of the 9/11 Memorial Museum
180 Greenwich Street, Limited Availability, Reservations Required, $30 per person

2:30 PM
New Member Tea and Tour (Only new members inducted since ECAD 2014)
Explorers Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street

5:30 PM
Polar Panel featuring David Hempleman-Adams, Eric Larsen, Frederik Paulsen, and Randi Skaug; Moderated by Honorary President Don Walsh at The Intrepid Theatre. This event precedes the 7:00pm cocktail reception and silent auction aboard the Intrepid, with limited availability.
Pier 86, West 46th Street & 12th Avenue, Seating is limited to 243, reservations required

7:00 PM
Cocktail Reception onboard the Intrepid; Honoring the EC Medalists and Team Rubicon/Plus Silent Auction Extraordinaire
Pier 86, West 46th Street & 12th Avenue, Free Admission for all ECAD ticket holders; $150 Guest Charge for Others, see above for details

Saturday, March 21st
10:00 AM
Private Tour of the American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West and 79th Street, no charge but limited availability, reservations required

10:00 AM
"Shackleton: Death or Glory," featuring Hon. Alexandra Shackleton and Tim Jarvis
Co-sponsored by the UK Mission to the United Nations
UN Economic & Social Council Chamber; 405 East 42nd Street. No charge, Seating is limited to 250, reservations required

1:00 PM
"Jumping from the Edge of Space," featuring free-fall record holders Col. Joe Kittinger and Alan Eustace, moderated by Richard Garriott de Cayeux
UN Economic & Social Council Chamber; 405 East 42nd Street. No charge, Seating is limited to 250, reservations required

Sunday, March 22nd
Explorers Club Headquarters, 46 East 70th Street
• Click here for a full list of afternoon speakers and program descriptions

9:00 am
Annual Membership Meeting (EC Members Only)

12:00 pm
Buffet Lunch at Headquarters (Members and ECAD Guests)

1:00 - 4:00 pm
Afternoon Programs

4:00 - 6:00 pm
Pastries, Prosecco, and More Surprises

Special Explorers Hotel Rate


The newly-renovated Loews Regency Hotel (540 Park Avenue at 61st Street) is providing a block of discounted rooms for the Annual Weekend. It is centrally located—just 9 blocks from the Explorers Club, and an easy walk to Central Park, the Museum of Modern Art, and 5th Avenue shopping. Rates are $289 for a Standard King and $389 for a Deluxe King; make reservations by calling 800-23-LOEWS and using the code: Explorers Club. The Club also has a list of alternate hotels, with a wide range of room rates. Please contact headquarters for more information. March is a busy time in New York, so we urge you to make your reservations early! Only 1000 dinner guests can be accommodated on Saturday night. Don’t miss the 2015 Annual Dinner…a “Night at the Museum” you’ll never forget!

Hold - ECAD Friday

Hold - ECAD Friday

Hold - ECAD Thursday

HOLD MAP ROOM - Membership Committee Meeting

HOLD MAP ROOM - Membership Committee Meeting

Date: 03-18-2015

Hold - Lee Langan Meeting in Map Room - 11am - Noon

Hold - Lee Langan Meeting in Map Room - 11am - Noon, per will request on 2/24

Hold - Les Guthman - Frost Productions - Map Room - 2-3pm

Hold - Les Guthman - Frost Productions - Map Room - 2-3pm

NYC - Public Lecture Series featuring Alex Chionetti


The Tayos Odyssey

This event will be streamed live. Please visit our Live Stream page at 7pm on the evening of the event to view the lecture for free.

This talk will provide an overview of the research and explorations of the cavern system of the Tayos caves located in the Morona Santiago, Province of Ecuador. One of the longest South American caves interconnecting underground Ecuador with Peru, it is located at the footsteps of the Cordillera del Condor’s landscape. Historical occupants left behind traces of explosive, buried mine patches and many unsolved mysteries which still stir the popular imagination and public opinion.

Explorer Alex Chionetti has been the key researcher of the project and was a witness to three decades of expeditions since the initial discovery. During the last seven years Chionetti launched several expeditions to study this cave system. He will share his experiences exploring the main cave of the Tayos’s systems - the Coangos, and the Pastaza River cave called Chumbitayo. Both generate legends and strange formations which continue baffling those interested in geological analysis and theories.

For the first time you will hear the story first hand of previous explorers now deceased. Alex will be showing HD images of the caves and its ducts, gates, tunnels which apparently permitted the existence of a major underground city.

Chionetti explored the "Cave of Tayos " (Morona Santiago, Ecuador) after overcoming many challenges and after several years of research and preparation; six months of exploration in the region of Morona Santiago; one of the most dangerous regions of the Amazonian basin. The area of his last travels became very dangerous as the Shuar Indians (who used to be known as the fierce Jivaros who shrunk their enemies heads) had been resisting the legal and illegal penetration of oil and mining companies; using this pretext to enforce a "license to kill" all trespassers.

Despite having all the negotiated permissions, Chionetti’s team almost lost their lives in the hands of natives and had to run out of the area, after largely concluding the exploration and filming of the place.

Chionetti’s interest included the investigation of the local legends but also to research the geological anomalies of a natural cave environment and the biology of the Tayos birds that use echolocation for their survival in the cave system. The only non bat species to do so.

Born in Argentina, Alex studied zoology and ethnology at the Museum of Natural Sciences of Buenos Aires. This brought him to expeditions involved in the archaeology of prehistoric tribes living in a cave system in the central region of the Cordoba province (He received an award for an essay 'Cuarta Dimension' award, 1978).

He has been a resident researcher at the Smithsonian Institution, invited by Betty Meggers to expand his theories and new evidences of migration. He also acted as a visual consultant for the Vice Curator of the Washington “Museum of American Indians" on the recent projects on the Inca Trails and made video recordings of remote villages of the High Andes of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile.

Date: 3/16/2015

Time: 6:00 pm Reception, 7:00 pm Lecture

Location: Club Headquarters, 46 E 70th Street, New York, NY, 10021

Member Ticket price: Free

Guest Ticket Price: $20

Student Ticket Price:

Free for EC Student Members, $5 w/ valid Student ID

Reservation Notes:

Reservations are allotted on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Please call 212.628.8383 or email us at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

Hold - Alan Nichols Event - Evening in the Trophy Room

Hold - Alan Nichols Event - Evening in the Trophy Room, per Will request

D/HOLD: Saturday Science for Students w/ Dr. Jody Evans (Topic TBD)

D/HOLD: Saturday Science for Students w/ Dr. Jody Evans (Topic TBD)

Date: 3/14/2015







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